10 COMMENTs
Web
Craig Buckler, Feb 28

Front-End Tooling Trends for 2017

Are you using the best development tools? Is your CSS compilation complicated? Have you bungled your JavaScript bundling? Craig discusses what we're using.
13 COMMENTs
HTML & CSS
Craig Buckler, Feb 28

How to Build Your Own Progressive Image Loader

Craig Buckler shares a very handy technique for progressive image loading — loading a smaller blurred version first, followed by the full resolution image.
2 COMMENTs
HTML & CSS
Alexis Goldstein, Feb 24

HTML5 Form Attributes (Part 1)

The following is an extract from our book, HTML5 & CSS3 for the Real World, 2nd Edition, written by Alexis Goldstein, Louis Lazaris, and Estelle Weyl. Copies are sold in stores worldwide, or you can buy it in ebook form here.

The required Attribute

The Boolean required attribute tells the browser to only submit the form if the field in question is filled out. Obviously, this means that the field can’t be left empty, but it also means that, depending on other attributes or the field’s type, only certain types of values will be accepted. Later in the chapter, we’ll be covering different ways of letting browsers know what kind of data is expected in a form.

HTML & CSS
Alexis Goldstein, Feb 23

HTML5 Forms: New Controls

There are five new form elements in the HTML5 forms specification: datalist, output, keygen, progress, and meter
1 COMMENT
HTML & CSS
Alexis Goldstein, Feb 21

Open Your Data Up to Bots Using Microdata

Microdata is another technology that’s rapidly gaining adoption and support, but, unlike WAI-ARIA, it’s technically part of HTML5. Although still early in development, it’s worth mentioning the Microdata specification here, because the technology provides a peek into what may be the future of document readability and semantics.

In the spec, Microdata is defined as a mechanism that “allows machine-readable data to be embedded in HTML documents in an easy-to-write manner, with an unambiguous parsing model.”

With Microdata, page authors can add specific labels to HTML elements, annotating them so that they can be read by machines or bots. This is done by means of a customized vocabulary. For example, you might want a script or other third-party service to be able to access your pages and interact with specific elements on the page in a certain manner. With Microdata, you can extend existing semantic elements (such as article and figure) to allow those services to have specialized access to the annotated content.

This can appear confusing, so let’s think about a real-world example. Let’s say your site includes reviews of movies. You might have each review in an article element, with a number of stars or a percentage score for your review. But when a machine comes along, such as Google’s search spider, it has no way of knowing which part of your content is the actual review—all it sees is a bunch of text on the page.

Why would a machine want to know what you thought of a movie? It’s worth considering that Google has started displaying richer information in its search results pages, in order to provide searchers with more than just textual matches for their queries. It does this by reading the review information encoded into those sites’ pages using Microdata or other similar technologies. An example of movie review information is shown below.

10 COMMENTs
HTML & CSS
Andy Kirk, Feb 21

Responsive CSS Patterns without Media Queries

Andy Kirk looks at some neat techniques to achieve responsive CSS patterns while we wait for element and container queries to be available!
HTML & CSS
Louis Lazaris, Feb 17

Validating HTML5 Documents

Let’s expand upon the concepts of validations a little more so that you can better understand how validating pages has changed
2 COMMENTs
JavaScript
George Martsoukos, Feb 15

Quick Tip: User Sortable Lists with Flexbox and jQuery

George Martsoukos shows how to build a simple Flexbox and jQuery plugin which sorts elements based on the values of their custom data attributes.
1 COMMENT
HTML & CSS
Tiffany Brown, Feb 15

CSS Pseudo-classes: Styling Elements Based on Their Index

CSS also provides selectors for matching elements based on their position in the document subtree. These are known as child–indexed pseudo-classes.
3 COMMENTs
HTML & CSS
Estelle Weyl, Feb 14

HTML5 Forms: Dependable Tools in Our Toolbox

HTML5 web forms have introduced new form elements, input types, attributes, native validation, and other form features.
16 COMMENTs
Mobile
Jose Rosario, Feb 13

Achieve 60 FPS Mobile Animations with CSS3

Animating elements in your mobile application is easy. And doing it the right way is easy, too... if you follow our tips here.
HTML & CSS
Maria Antonietta Perna, Feb 09

Awesome Front-end Resources and CSS Animation Course

Maria Antonietta Perna presents some front-end learning resources and the new SitePoint Premium's CSS Animation course by Donovan Hutchinson
HTML & CSS
Donovan Hutchinson, Feb 08

Bringing Websites to Life with CSS Animations

CSS animations are fast becoming an essential design tool and tap into a more engaged audience through micro interactions and visual validation.
Design & UX
Alex Walker, Feb 08

Catching Frontend UI Design Tricks with SnappySnippet

Often the key to understanding complex things is to understand their simpler parts first. SnappySnippet is a tool that can help you with that.
HTML & CSS
Tiffany Brown, Feb 08

CSS Pseudo-classes: Styling Form Fields Based on Their Input

Let’s take a look at some pseudo-classes that are specific to form fields and form field input. These pseudo-classes can be used to style fields
1 COMMENT
HTML & CSS
Asha Laxmi, Feb 07

Using Fontello to Only Load Icon Fonts That You Need

Asha Laxmi explores how to more effectively use icon fonts in your projects by building custom, tailored font files for your custom fonts using Fontello.
HTML & CSS
Louis Lazaris, Feb 07

More HTML5 Semantics: New Elements and Features

In this section, let's touch on lesser-known elements, attributes, and features that have been added to the HTML5 spec
3 COMMENTs
HTML & CSS
Tiffany Brown, Feb 03

CSS Pseudo-classes: :not() and :target

Perhaps the most powerful of this new crop of pseudo-classes is :not(). It returns all elements except for those that match the selector argument.
1 COMMENT
HTML & CSS
Louis Lazaris, Feb 01

More HTML5 Semantics: Changes to Existing Features

While new elements and APIs have been the primary focus of HTML5, this latest iteration of web markup has also brought with it changes to existing elements.
HTML & CSS
Louis Lazaris, Jan 31

20+ Docs and Guides for Front-end Developers (No. 11)

Louis Lazaris is here with installment number 11 of his series on fantastic learning resources, docs and guides for front-end developers 
HTML & CSS
Tiffany Brown, Jan 27

CSS Selectors: Specificity

Think of specificity as a score or rank that determines which style declarations are ultimately applied to an element
HTML & CSS
Nitish Kumar, Jan 26

A Step by Step Guide to the Auto-Placement Algorithm in CSS Grid

Nitish Kumar gets close and personal with the workings of the auto-placement algorithm in the CSS Grid Layout module
1 COMMENT
HTML & CSS
Louis Lazaris, Jan 26

More HTML5 Semantics: Content Types & New Elements

In this chapter, we’ll discuss even more new elements, along with changes to content types, available in HTML5
HTML & CSS
Tiffany Brown, Jan 23

CSS Selectors: Pseudo-elements