Since I took over as Managing Editor of SitePoint’s HTML and CSS content, I’ve been constantly on the lookout for new authors.

In addition to my usual one-on-one contact efforts, I thought it would be helpful to spread the word by means of a post to let everyone know what we’re looking for and how you’ll benefit from writing for SitePoint.

First Things First: What’s the Pay?

SitePoint pays $150 for articles and $200 for tutorials. A tutorial is generally any in-depth article that has either a demo or code download link or that is very code-heavy in general, even if it doesn’t have an actual demo. We are also willing to pay $300 or more for articles and tutorials that are lengthier and that we feel will do well traffic-wise.

If you provide us 3 articles or tutorials per month, that could be anywhere from $450 to $600 per month in supplemantary income. Not a bad deal.

Now that I’ve lured you in, let’s discuss the types of content we’re looking for.

Write About CSS

CSS is constantly a hot topic in the community, so I’ll always consider a CSS article or tutorial idea. Below are some tips for what we’re looking for in CSS content:

  • Demos! We’re using SitePoint-themed CodePen embeds for our demos on the HTML and CSS channels. Articles with at least one embedded demo almost always do well.
  • A good handle on the subject from a standards, browser, and compatibility standpoint. CSS is not a new subject, so it’s important that authors show a good grasp of the subject being covered.
  • Coverage of a popular CSS framework, tool, or library. For example, pretty much anything with “Bootstrap” in the title will do well, but the key is to provide something fresh and new.

For reference, here are our top 5 CSS articles from this year, by traffic:

  1. 12 Little-Known CSS Facts
  2. Understanding Bootstrap Modals
  3. Beyond Bootstrap and Foundation: Frameworks You’ve Never Heard Of
  4. The Current Generation of CSS3 Selectors
  5. The Power of em Units in CSS

Just to illustrate how much people enjoy articles on obscure CSS tips, the first article on that list has accumulated about as much traffic as all the other four combined!

That should give you an idea of the type of content that gets high amounts of traffic in the realm of CSS.

Write About HTML

HTML is another good topic that does well. Here are some suggestions on stuff you might write about in the HTML category:

  • A new tag or set of tags that aren’t as well-known, describing how they are beneficial semantically or otherwise.
  • Accessibility and how it relates to HTML tags or attributes.
  • One of the HTML5 APIs. It’s true, this could also fall under the JavaScript category, but if the article is not too technical, but more of an overview, it can fall under “HTML”.

Here are our top 5 HTML articles of 2014:

  1. 10 HTML Tags You May Not Be Using
  2. 10 HTML5 APIs Worth Looking Into
  3. HTML5 Canvas Tutorial: An Introduction
  4. New HTML5 Attributes for Hyperlinks: download, media, and ping
  5. Using Meta Tags in HTML: Some Basics and Best Practices

As you can see, there’s lots that you can cover from the HTML spec and from the various APIs.

Write About Sass

Sass is probably one of the fastest growing topics right now. For many developers, Sass has become the new CSS, so traffic for Sass content is constantly on the rise.

It’s true that our primary Sass author Hugo Giraudel is a tough act to follow, but our audience is at varying levels. Here are some suggestions for Sass articles:

  • Write something that beginners would benefit from. For this, you don’t have to be a super-expert like Hugo!
  • Pick a single feature in Sass and break it down, showing all parts of its syntax.
  • List and discuss some useful Sass tools, or dissect a single tool and tell us how to use it and why it’s cool.

Here are our top 5 Sass articles of 2014 to date:

  1. My Current CSS and Sass Styleguide
  2. Sass: Mixin or Placeholder?
  3. Architecture for a Sass Project
  4. My Favorite Sass Tools
  5. A Sass Component in 10 Minutes

Oh and, in case you’re wondering, they’re all written by Hugo! :)

But again, don’t be intimidated by that. I’m glad to publish simpler Sass content that’s geared more towards those just getting started with Sass or those who have never even touched it. There’s lots in the Sass docs worth writing about, so feel free to give it a shot.

What About Other Topics?

In addition to the main topics covered on SitePoint and handled by dedicated editors (PHP, Ruby, Design, Mobile, etc.), we also have a general Web category that covers topics that don’t fall under the others. Topics might include:

  • Developer tools
  • Git, GitHub, and open source
  • Performance
  • Browser stats/trends
  • Task runners (Grunt, Gulp, etc.)

What About English Skills?

Admittedly, one of the challenges to recruiting regular authors is finding authors who have a strong command of the English language. We get lots of offers from people who don’t have English as a first language, and we often have to reject submissions based on poor English.

We’re not looking for perfect English skills, but we do have very high standards in this area, so if your English skills are not very strong, it’s likely we won’t be able to accept anything from you. Sorry! :(

Interested? Get in Touch!

The above should give you a good idea of what we’re looking for. For more info on writing for SitePoint, check out our writing guidelines.

And if that all sounds good, you can contact me at louis.lazaris [AT] sitepoint.com with a single topic idea or a completed article in Markdown format and we can go from there. It might be better to submit a topic first, just to make sure it’s not something we’ve covered recently and that we’d be willing to publish.

Louis is a dev blogger at Impressive Webs, author, and is currently SitePoint's HTML and CSS editor. He loves all things front-end, and curates Web Tools Weekly, a newsletter for front-end developers primarily focused on tools.

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  • Ravi Kumar

    Nice, anything about PHP and its frameworks ?

    • OphelieLechat

      Yep, we’re also always looking for PHP writers. You can email me a topic pitch directly at ophelie@sitepoint.com

      (This also applies to Ruby, Mobile, Design, JavaScript, Go, Python, etc)

      • Deco Slim

        Hello, I just emailed you with a topic i will like to write about

  • Adam

    Hi, how about WordPress specific article/tutorial?

    • adam__roberts

      WordPress too! As Ophelie’s mentioned below, pitch us at ophelie@sitepoint.com

      • MrDarkside

        Awesome, gonna be all over PHP and WordPress And HTML..and CSS. Been too long away from here!

  • http://dada.theblogbowl.in/ Shaumik Daityari

    I’d like to say one thing to the readers (and potential authors for SitePoint).

    You may have read a lot of guidelines on how to write your articles (even SitePoint has one). But all of them are usually general guidelines and chances are that you will not be able to improve yourself reading those. What you need is a good editor, who can give you feedback on what you write- and only such specific feedback will help you identify what is wrong with you and what you need to improve. Louis is great at that!

    Apart from the pay, working with a great guy like Louis should be a motivation for you too!

    • http://www.buildyourownwebstore.com/ Jacco Blankenspoor

      Fully agree on this one. Louis is very helpful, and so are the editors of the other channels. The pay is great indeed, but these guys (and girl ;-) really help you advance as a writer!
      Let’s not forget the readers either, who show great engagement on your articles and often add very valuable information in the comments.

      • http://dada.theblogbowl.in/ Shaumik Daityari

        And some of the comments lead to new article ideas!

        • http://www.buildyourownwebstore.com/ Jacco Blankenspoor

          We’re totally on the same page here ;-)

      • amit d

        RIght Jacco, not even Louis – but Ophelie, Alex, and Chris (I would like to also mention Ricky Onsman) helps writers in advancing their skills. They give fair feedback and some great article title suggestions.

    • http://tech4sky.com Agbonghama Collins

      Couldn’t agree with you more. My writing skills especially my grammar and use of words were below average at the start.
      Thanks to guys like Louis and Bruno (PHP editor) for their patience, i think i have improved.

    • http://viii.in Vinay Raghu

      Thanks for sharing this useful information!

  • Zaid Habjoka

    How about SPA Frameworks ? Like AngularJs?

    • LouisLazaris

      Yes, but that would fall under the JavaScript channel. Contact ophelie (at) sitepoint.com, our editor in chief, and propose your idea. She will pass your idea on to the JavaScript editor.

  • sherlocktorwho

    Is there a limit on age?

    • LouisLazaris

      Absolutely not. If you can write about any of the above topics, it doesn’t matter how young or old you are.

  • J. Esteban Acosta Villafañe

    Hey! Is it possible to mix HTML and CSS topics in the same article?

    • LouisLazaris

      Of course! Sometimes you can’t help it, they work together! Email me (see last section in article) and let me know what you have in mind. Thanks.

  • Fayçal

    Hi, how about articles/tutorials about code editors ?

  • Sahar Waqar

    I am interested. How will you hire me ?

  • Matt MacLeod

    Can I illustrate my command of the English language by highlighting that you’ve spelt ‘supplementary” incorrectly in the fourth paragraph?

  • Web Developer

    Is it necessary that we have to post large number of articles in a month?

  • adam__roberts

    Not at all, you can definitely work at your own pace.

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