jquery get parent element with specific class

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Quick jQuery snippet to get parent elements with specific class.

var container = $(this).parents('.item');

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about jQuery Parent Element with Specific Class

How can I select a parent element with a specific class in jQuery?

To select a parent element with a specific class in jQuery, you can use the .parents() method combined with a class selector. For example, if you want to select the parent element with the class ‘parent-class’ of an element with the class ‘child-class’, you can use the following code:

$('.child-class').parents('.parent-class');
This will return the first parent element with the class ‘parent-class’ that it encounters while traversing up the DOM tree.

What is the difference between .parent() and .parents() in jQuery?

The .parent() method in jQuery returns the direct parent element of the selected element, while the .parents() method returns all ancestor elements of the selected element, traversing up through the DOM tree. If a selector is provided, it retrieves only the ancestors that match that selector.

Can I use .closest() instead of .parents() to find a parent with a specific class?

Yes, you can use the .closest() method to find the closest ancestor that matches the specified selector. Unlike .parents(), which traverses up the DOM tree and returns all ancestors that match the selector, .closest() stops at the first match it finds. Here’s an example:

$('.child-class').closest('.parent-class');

How can I perform an action on a parent element with a specific class in jQuery?

You can perform an action on a parent element with a specific class by chaining the action to the .parents() or .closest() method. For example, to add a class to the parent element, you can use the following code:

$('.child-class').parents('.parent-class').addClass('new-class');

How can I select multiple parent elements with different classes in jQuery?

To select multiple parent elements with different classes, you can use multiple selectors with the .parents() method. Separate each class with a comma. Here’s an example:

$('.child-class').parents('.parent-class1, .parent-class2');

What if the parent element with the specific class does not exist?

If the parent element with the specific class does not exist, the .parents() or .closest() method will return an empty jQuery object. You can check if the parent exists by using the .length property. If .length returns 0, it means the parent does not exist.

Can I use .parents() with other jQuery traversal methods?

Yes, you can use .parents() with other jQuery traversal methods like .find(), .siblings(), .children(), etc. This allows you to navigate the DOM tree more effectively.

How can I get the class of a parent element in jQuery?

To get the class of a parent element, you can use the .attr() method with the ‘class’ attribute after selecting the parent element. Here’s an example:

var parentClass = $('.child-class').parent().attr('class');

Can I use .parents() method with HTML elements instead of classes?

Yes, you can use the .parents() method with HTML elements. For example, to select all div parents of an element, you can use $('.child-class').parents('div');.

How can I select the immediate parent element with a specific class in jQuery?

To select the immediate parent element with a specific class, you can use the .parent() method with a class selector. If the immediate parent does not have the specified class, it will return an empty jQuery object. Here’s an example:

$('.child-class').parent('.parent-class');

Sam DeeringSam Deering
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Sam Deering has 15+ years of programming and website development experience. He was a website consultant at Console, ABC News, Flight Centre, Sapient Nitro, and the QLD Government and runs a tech blog with over 1 million views per month. Currently, Sam is the Founder of Crypto News, Australia.

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