HTML & CSS - - By Ivaylo Gerchev

How to Create Beautiful HTML & CSS Presentations with WebSlides

HTML Presentations with WebSlides

This article was peer reviewed by Ralph Mason, Giulio Mainardi, and Mikhail Romanov. Thanks to all of SitePoint’s peer reviewers for making SitePoint content the best it can be!

Presentations are one of the best ways to serve information to an audience. The format is short and sharp, made up of small, digestible chunks, which makes any topic under discussion engaging and easier to understand. A presentation can contain all kinds of data, represented by many different elements, such as tables, charts, diagrams, illustrations, images, videos, sounds, maps, lists, etc, all of which lends great flexibility to this medium of expression.

Particularly on the web, presentations come in handy on many occasions, and there are loads of tools at your disposal to create some nifty ones. Today, I’ll introduce you to WebSlides — a small and compact library with a nice set of ready-to-use components, which you can leverage to build well-crafted and attractive web presentations:

WebSlides “is about telling the story, and sharing it in a beautiful way.”

In fact, one of WebSlides’ main benefits is that you can share your story beautifully and in a variety of different ways. With one and the same architecture — 40+ components with semantic classes, and clean and scalable code — you can create portfolios, landings, longforms, interviews, etc.

Besides, you can also extend WebSlides’ functionality by combining it with third-party services and tools such as Unsplash, Animate.css, Animate On Scroll, and so on.

WebSlides is easy to learn and fun to use. Let’s see it in action now.

Getting Started with WebSlides

To get started, first download WebSlides. Then, in the root folder, create a new folder and call it presentation. Inside the newly created presentation folder, create a new file and call it index.html. Now, enter the following code, which contains the needed references to the WebSlides’ files (make sure the filepaths correspond to the folder structure in your setup):

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>

    <!-- Google Fonts -->
    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto:100,100i,300,300i,400,400i,700,700i%7CMaitree:200,300,400,600,700&subset=latin-ext" rel="stylesheet"/>
    <!-- CSS Base -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" type='text/css' media='all' href="../static/css/base.css"/>
    <!-- CSS Colors -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" type='text/css' media='all' href="../static/css/colors.css"/>
    <!-- Optional - CSS SVG Icons (Font Awesome) -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" type='text/css' media='all' href="../static/css/svg-icons.css"/>
      
  <body>
    <!-- PUT WEBSLIDES PRESENTATION CONTENT HERE -->

    <script src="../static/js/webslides.js"></script>
    <script>
      window.ws = new WebSlides();
    </script>

    <!-- OPTIONAL - svg-icons.js (fontastic.me - Font Awesome as svg icons) -->
    <script defer src="../static/js/svg-icons.js"></script>
  </body>

Now, you’re ready to go.

Create a Web Presentation with WebSlides

In this section you’re going to create a short, but complete presentation, which explains why SVG is the future of web graphics.
Note: If you are interested in SVG, please check my articles: SVG 101: What is SVG? and How to Optimize and Export SVGs in Adobe Illustrator.

You’ll be working step by step on each slide. Let’s get started with the first one.

Slide 1

The first slide is pretty simple. It contains only one sentence:

<article id="webslides">
  <!-- First slide -->
  <section class="bg-gradient-r aligncenter">
    <h1>Why SVG Is the Future of Web Graphics?</h1>
  </section>
  <!-- Second slide -->
  <section>
    ...
  </section>
  <!-- Third slide -->
  <section>
    ...
  </section>
  <!-- etc. -->
</article>

Each parent <section> inside <article id="webslides"> creates an individual slide. Here, you’ve used two classes from WebSlides’ arsenal, i.e., bg-gradient-r and aligncenter, to apply a radial gradient background and to align the slide content to the center respectively.

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 1

Slide 2

The second slide explains what SVG is:

<section>
  <div class="wrap">
    <div class="content-left">
      <h2>What Is SVG?</h2>
      <p class="text-subtitle">Scalable Vector Graphics</p>
      <hr>
      <p class="text-intro">SVG is an XML-based vector graphic format used to display a wide range of graphics on the Web.</p>
      <p class="text-intro">SVG documents are just plain text files and can be created and edited in every text editor.</p>
    </div>
    <div class="content-right">
      <img src="traffic-lights.png">
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

The code above uses the content-left and content-right classes to separate the content into two columns. Also, in order to make the above classes work, you need to wrap all content by using the wrap class. On the left side, the code uses text-subtitle to make the text all caps, and text-intro to increase the font size. The right side consists of an illustrative image.

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 2

Slide 3

The next slide uses the grid component to create two columns:

<section class="aligncenter">
  <h2>SVG Is Future-Proof</h2>
  <p class="text-subtitle">As long as the W3C sets the global industry standards, it seems that SVG will continue to be the de-facto standard for vector graphics in the browser.</p>
  <hr>
  <div class="grid">
    <div class="column">
      <p class="text-intro" style="text-align: left">SVG is a W3C standard. This makes SVG future-proof. Technologies are rapidly changing. What's here today could be gone tomorrow. But SVG will most likely be around for a long time.</p>
    </div>
    <div class="column">
      <figure class="browser">
        <img src="standard.png">
      </figure>
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

The snippet above shows how to use the grid and column classes to create a grid with two columns. In the first column the style attribute aligns the text to the left (Note how the aligncenter class on the <section> element cascades through to its .column child element, which causes all text inside the slide to be center aligned). In the second column, the browser class makes the illustrative image look like a screenshot.

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 3

Slide 4

In the fourth slide, use the grid component again to split the content into two columns:

<section>
  <h2 class="aligncenter">SVG Is the Best Graphic Format for the Web</h2>
  <hr>
  <div class="grid">
    <div class="column">
      <p class="text-intro">What makes SVG so preferable for the Web is its remarkable usefulness and unlimited flexibility. It's the only one graphic format which most closely and completely responds to the current web development demands such as <em>scalability, responsibility, interactivity, programmability, and accessibility</em>.</p>
    </div>
    <div class="column">
      <p class="text-intro">As a graphic format SVG perfectly suits the needs of the web because it satisfies both designers and developers. An illustration can be easily created by a designer with any vector software, and then, the exported SVG can be transferred to a developer who can add animation or some other interactivity.</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 4

Slide 5

In this slide, place half of the content to the left and the other half to the right using the content-left and content-right classes respectively:

<section>
  <div class="wrap">
    <div class="content-left">
      <h2>SVG Usage Is Growing</h2>
      <p class="text-subtitle">Over the last year SVG usage has doubled.</p>
      <hr>
      <p>As of 2014 SVG usage is growing continuously (image below) and it has doubled over the last year (right image).</p>
      <img src="svg-usage-numbers.png">
    </div>
    <div class="content-right">
      <img src="svg-usage.png">
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 5

Slide 6

In this slide, use the background class to embed an image as a background with the Unsplash service. Put the headline on light, transparent background by using the bg-trans-light class. The text’s color appears white, because the slide uses a black background with the bg-black class, therefore the default color is inversed, i.e., white on black rather than black on white. Also, for the text to be visible in front of the image, wrap it with <div class="wrap">:

<section class="aligncenter bg-black">
  <span class="background" style="background-image:url('https://source.unsplash.com/ICW6QYOcdlg/800x600')"></span>
  <div class="wrap">
    <h2 class="bg-trans-light"><em>SVG Solves the Most Important Problems in Modern Web Development</em></h2>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 6

Slide 7

In this slide, put the explanation text on the left and the illustrative image on the right at 40% of its default size (with the alignright and size-40 classes on the <img> element). For this and the next three slides, use slideInRight, which is one of WebSlides’ built-in CSS animations:

<section class="slideInRight">
  <div class="wrap">
    <img src="responsive.jpg" class="alignright size-40">
    <h3>1. Scalability</h3>
    <p class="text-subtitle">SVG is like an infinitely scalable canvas</p>
    <p>Because of its vector nature an SVG drawing can scale and adapt to any size without loosing sharpness. In contrast, raster-based formats, such as GIF, JPG, and PNG, are static and have fixed dimensions. Although techniques for responsive images are good, they still can not compete with the SVG's ability to scale infinitely. No matter what device you use, SVG will adapt and scale perfectly keeping the graphic's visual appearance intact.</p>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 7

Slide 8

Do a similar thing here:

<section  class="slideInRight">
  <div class="wrap">
    <img src="interactivity.jpg" class="alignright size-40">
    <h3>2. Interactivity</h3>
    <p class="text-subtitle">SVG Drawings are dynamic and interactive</p>
    <p>SVG is fully scriptable. It can be manipulated with CSS and/or JavaScript. An SVG graphic can be animated and can respond to user actions.</p>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 8

Slide 9

This slide also uses a similar structure:

<section  class="slideInRight">
  <div class="wrap">
    <img src="svg-market-position.png" class="alignright size-40">
    <h3>3. Performance</h3>
    <p class="text-subtitle">SVG is the preferred image format for high traffic sites</p>
    <p>Because SVG is just plain text, in most cases the file size will be smaller compared to its bitmap counterparts (JPEG and PNG). So the impact on web page performance will be minimized.</p>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 9

Slide 10

Here, divide the content into left and right again. In the second <p> tag, use the inline style attribute to adjust the font-size and line-height properties. Doing so will override the text-intro class styles that get applied to the element by default. On the right side, use <div class="wrap size-80"> to create a container for the SVG code example:

<section  class="slideInRight">
  <div class="wrap">
    <div class="content-left">
      <h3>4. Accessibility</h3>
      <p class="text-subtitle">SVG text is real and editable</p>
      <p style="font-size: 1.8rem; line-height: 3.2rem">SVG files are text-based and can be searched and indexed. This makes them readable by screen readers, search engines and other devices. The ability of SVG to bring visuals to those who cannot see, extends its reach into many domains that pixel-based graphics just cannot go.</p>
    </div>
    <div class="content-right">
      <div class="wrap size-80">
        <pre>&lt;svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 200 100"&gt;

&lt;text x="10" y="20"&gt;SVG offers real and editable text&lt;/text&gt;

&lt;/svg&gt;
        </pre>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 10

Slide 11

Here, leverage some of the classes you’ve already used to illustrate browser support for SVG:

<section class="aligncenter">
  <h2>SVG Has Very Good Browser Support</h2>
  <p class="text-subtitle">The browser support for SVG is 97% and above</p>
  <hr>
  <div class="wrap">
    <img src="caniuse.png">
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 11

Slide 12

In this slide, show some of the use cases for SVG in the form of an image gallery. To this end, use an unordered list with the flexblock and gallery classes. Each item in the gallery is marked up with a li tag:

<section>
  <h2>SVG Has Many Different Use Cases</h2>
  <hr>
  <ul class="flexblock gallery">
    <li>
     <a href="#">
       <figure>
         <img alt="Thumbnail" src="illustration.jpg">
         <figcaption>
           <h2>Plain Illustrations</h2>
         </figcaption>
       </figure>
     </a>
   </li>
   <li>
     <a href="#">
       <figure>
         <img alt="Thumbnail " src="icons.jpg">
         <figcaption>
           <h2>Logos and Icons</h2>
         </figcaption>
       </figure>
     </a>
   </li>
   <li>
     ...
   </li>
   ...
 </ul>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 12

Slide 13

This section shows a typical SVG workflow, so you need to use the flexblock and steps classes, which show the content as a sequence of steps. Again, each step is placed inside a li tag:

<section>
  <h2>The SVG Workflow Is Straightforward</h2>
  <ul class="flexblock steps">
    <li>
      <span>
        <svg class="fa-file-image-o">
          <use xlink:href="#fa-file-image-o"></use>
        </svg>
      </span>
      <h2>01. Draw</h2>
      <p>Draw your graphic in a vector editing program such as Adobe Illustrator</p>
    </li>
    <li>
      <div class="process step-2"></div>
      <span>
        <svg class="fa-file-code-o">
          <use xlink:href="#fa-file-code-o"></use>
        </svg>
      </span>
      <h2>02. Export</h2>
      <p>Export the drawing as an SVG file</p>
    </li>
    <li>
     ...
    </li>
  </ul>
</section>

For each step after the first one, you need to add the process-step-# class. This adds a triangle pointing to the next step.

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 13

Slide 14

In the last slide, use another one of WebSlides’ built-in CSS animations, i.e., zoomIn:

<section class="zoomIn bg-black">
  <span class="background" style="background-image:url('https://source.unsplash.com/fPkvU7RDmCo/800x600')"></span>
  <div class="wrap">
    <h2 class="aligncenter">Start Coding SVG Today!</h2>
  </div>
</section>

WebSlides Presentation Demo: Slide 14

Congratulations! You’re done. You can see the final outcome here:

See the Pen HTML and CSS Presentation Demo with WebSlides by SitePoint (@SitePoint) on CodePen.

Conclusion

Et voilà! You have just created a beautiful, fully functional and responsive web presentation. But this is just the tip of the iceberg, there’s a lot more you can quickly create with WebSlides and many other WebSlides features which I didn’t cover in this short tutorial.

To learn more, explore the WebSlides Components and CSS architecture documentation, or start customizing the demos already available to you in the downloadable folder.

Then, focus on your content and let WebSlides do its job.

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