I want to make a home page with html/css, then add a shopping cart, ALL IN 1 CMS

I want to be able to make a custom website with html/css in cms (perhaps joomla?), and I want to add a shopping cart using some 3rd party interface such as shopsite or any good software (hopefully affordable or open source), then give my client- with no website skills- access to both so he can edit both the landing page and the shopping cart in ONE wysiwig interface. I am trying to avoid my client having to learn 2 interfaces (1 for the custom website, 1 for the shopping cart). It seems at this point if I want my client to be able to edit his own website and cart in one cms I will have to do everything with a generic shopping cart template, including the landing page. I don’t want to do this.

  1. Can I do what I want to do in Joomla?
  2. am I better off with some other program?, or
  3. Should I work from the other end and find a shopping cart with a CMS that allows me to create my own landing page and additional pages from pure html and css? Or
    4.will I just have to create the website with joomla, create the shopping cart separately with, say, shopsite, then give my customer access to both CMSs?

There is also Kooboo CMS which, if I understand correctly, says on their website that I can convert an html doc to their cms. They also say they have a shopping cart.

Thank you very much for the help from anyone.

You should use Wordpress Multi-site. Make a blog as your main page which let you post articles etc… and a Woocommerce plugin which let you add products as posts etc…

Who is Woo? Should I trust them? What about wordpress plug-in security issues and lack of accountability from plug-in developers when it comes to ensuring their applications are secure enough for some kind of security standard? Apparently none exists for open-source blog cms tools.

I think wordpress is fine for a gardening blog or something, but never for ecommerce.

Rofl… and your first question was: 1. Can I do what I want to do in Joomla? You’re kidding, right?

I just re-evaluated my needs and my question and came to the conclusion that no open-source cms is probably going to be a safe risk to take, as it probably increases the avenues of approach for hackers. If one is not proficient in hacking say, shopsite’s application, then they may be in joomla or wordpress, etc. I think I should just upload the site folder directly to my server, and use the cms of the e-commerce software alone for the shopping cart. If I combine the two it will not be on a general cms with no security standards. I will attempt to combine everything in the one shopping cart company’s cms.

Any feedback from anyone on that decision would be appreciated.

Ya, Zakelijk, I understand what you mean. I guess you helped me to realize what I should not do. I admit I didn’t think about that at first.

I know plenty of webshops which work fine with those kind of software it’s just that the software is limited to small and medium shops… If you really planning to go big with 20.000+ products then i would advice you to use “Magento”, but i gotta warn you that it’s a lot harder then Joomla and WordPress…

If your planning for a webshop with 1000 a 2000 products just go for it… get a SSL-certificate and start selling :slight_smile: Keep it simple :slight_smile:

I’ve know big stores that use Drupal and Joomla.

One thing is that you don’t take them seriously and something else is that they can’t do what he wants.

@hyper1 ;

Magento, Joomla, WordPress, Drupal… all of them can do what you want but making a decision is not easy.

You need to look into:

  • learning curve - Magento is the hardest by far. That’s why is not always suitable.

  • budget - Magento is the most expensive. Again, this is one of the reason why it may not be suitable for all the projects.

  • Support - The four of them have great support. In the case of WordPress, Drupal, Joomla because they have great communities. In the case of Magento because it is included in their fee. WordPress shopping extentions have never been designed for big stores

  • Security - A CMS or e-Store is not safer because it isn’t open source. Many of the security holes come from a bad configuration (CMS’s or/and server’s). While it would be easier for a malicious hacker to find a exploit in an FREE open source project (not all open source are free) because he can look at the code, it is also true that when a strong, big community is behind, exploits are corrected much faster.
    Paid and non-open source CMS may suffer of security holes exactly the same as any other.
    Magento and Drupal have the best reputation

  • Gateway integration - Any of them will give you thousands of possibilities, depending which plugin you use (or, in the case of Magento, because it was built as a online store database from the beggining)

Now, let’s see what you want and your questions

I want to be able to make a custom website with html/css in cms (perhaps joomla?), and I want to add a shopping cart using some 3rd party interface such as shopsite or any good software (hopefully affordable or open source), then give my client- with no website skills- access to both so he can edit both the landing page and the shopping cart in ONE wysiwig interface. I am trying to avoid my client having to learn 2 interfaces (1 for the custom website, 1 for the shopping cart). It seems at this point if I want my client to be able to edit his own website and cart in one cms I will have to do everything with a generic shopping cart template, including the landing page. I don’t want to do this.


Any CMS with shopping cart plugins will integrate the shopping cart backend in the CMS backend or will give you the possibility to create your own plugin to do just that.

If the shopping cart you’re using is popular, this plugin will exist, almost for sure :slight_smile:

1. Can I do what I want to do in Joomla?
Yes. And in WordPress. And in Drupal. And, of course, Magento.

2. am I better off with some other program?, or
If that’s what you know, what you control and you’re good at it, Joomla can be as good as any other. I do confess that it is not my favourite but every single system has its ups and downs.
This is a question of analisys and research. So if you don’t know what to use then you should be investigating the answers to some of the questions I asked before.
Of course, the size of the store and budget also play an important role when making a decision. But do remember that sometimes cheap can mean expensive in the long term.

3. Should I work from the other end and find a shopping cart with a CMS that allows me to create my own landing page and additional pages from pure html and css? Or
That would be Magento :lol: Again, this really depends on the overall goal of the site. If the site exists only and solely to be an online store, maybe this route is not bad at all.

You can also look into shopify for a similar option

4.will I just have to create the website with joomla, create the shopping cart separately with, say, shopsite, then give my customer access to both CMSs?
That’s another option and again, it depends on budget, personal preferences, trust, the goal of the site…

This would mean to make the most of both worlds. As an example WordPress for blogging and Magento for shopping. Magento does have an API so you could program WordPress to show the sale information in its backend. Although I think there’s a plugin for that.

In this particular case I didn’t go for Joomla or Drupal because neither of them were built as a web store. Magento was.

There is also Kooboo CMS which, if I understand correctly, says on their website that I can convert an html doc to their cms. They also say they have a shopping cart.

Thank you very much for the help from anyone.
There are a lot of CMS out there that are fantastic and that I didn’t mention. There are so many that I stopped looking at other CMSs. I was just going crazy with so much information :lol:

If you want to keep it simple for your client, I’d look into Expressionengine + Cartthrob. Not sure about your experience with EE or if you are looking for something free, but this setup keeps it nice and tidy.

EE costs $299 and Cartthrob is another $299. Beyond that, you can create the admin just the way you want for your client to manage their products.

Just throwing it out there as another option on the table other than the usual suspects.

Store is also another great cart add-on for EE. I fear this setup is out of the price range of the OP. It’s also worth looking into solutions like Shopify and Goodsie.