Using WiFi to host your site/server

Hi, only recently I began studying about servers/hosting etc. after being disapointed with current shared hosting services for some of my soon to be websites and eCommerce store.

So today I read up on WiFi networks and got excited about the WiMax technology with assymetric speeds of 70mbps (maybe more).

Anyway I would like to know how much traffic say 10mbps could sustain(yes ill do the the math for other speeds)?

The scenario would be a common eCommerce store(using osCommerce) and also a community based site(using a CMS like TikiWiki).

Also is there any pitfalls in using WiFi to serve on? Yes im aware of network sabotage using disruptive devices of same frequencies.

Thanks heaps,
Jamie.

As a current hosting provider I’m always interested in new technology. The problem would be how do you sustain multiple bandwidth providers to ensure you have maximum uptime while using WiFi? 70 megs is nothing for todays standards of fast networks. Our servers are housed in a datacenter with a 12 gig network connection of multiple providers.

I just don’t see the point of using wireless for hosting solution when existing technology works, if not better, than WiFi. Plus all the R & D cost of developing this system wouldn’t give you any ROI. If you change your focus to something like using WiFi for business networks in a local area then you might have more luck.

Yes but that bandwidth is shared between hundreds of people isnt it?

I cant realy see it as being too much difficult to work with. I would have thought it would be easier seeing that you can skip all that co-location business. You could just sign up with an ISP offering this fast WiFi service.

Eventualy it will all be done through wireless; its just a matter of time. Considering some people set up their site at home with a 256kbps connection I would have assumed that 70mbps(being 250 times faster) would be ideal for most applications.

Jamie.

Yes but that bandwidth is shared between hundreds of people isnt it?

More than hundreds.

I personally wouldn’t host a mission-critical site off a WiFi connection but then, I wouldn’t host it at home at all when I could get more reliability from a dedicated server at a well known datacenter. Sure you could do it and it would probably work but if the connection went down for whatever reason (and WiFi does), then you have no web site.

Say you got a dedicated server somewhere. Sure the datacenter will have a few Gbps bandwidth, but your computer is on a network, usually only with a 10Mb NIC. It’ll handle plenty of traffic but if you have large downloads etc, your high-bandwidth users will notice the speed difference.

For your average website though that doesn’t need to be online 24/7 then yeah, WiFi would work alright.

I definitely think that servers should not be on a wireless connection… I’ve always found them to be much less reliable, and you don’t want a server that loses its connection every five minutes!

I just don’t see why you would bother advertising you’re hosting using a WiFi service. In the end customers don’t care about what you use as long as the service is reliable and secure. To me, wireless would be open to many more attacks because your signals are now floating around in the air. At least with a wired network things would be more secure. What happens when someone breaches your wireless network and installs packet sniffers captures all your clients information without even hooking up any network cables :slight_smile:

I personally just don’t like the idea of wireless that much. You are right about the speed, 70 megs would kick butt either way you look at it just making it redundant would be a challenge. I’m currently running a 5 meg line at my house on cable and it’s nice for downloads and I could probably run a small site from it but I have about 4 dedicated servers in super fast networks for that :slight_smile:

Wireless is growing quickly, I personally love it for my laptop so it will be something to keep an eye out for. I can’t really get that kind of speed for wireless around here.