Replacement for Dreamweaver


#1

Hi everyone!
Just wondering what you use to manage projects/websites? Lately dreamweaver has been so slow it’s unbelievable. I’m still running CS6 and don’t want to upgrade to the membership version.

I really only use Dreamweaver to manage multiple websites, connect directly to the server to save edits and obviously edit codes.

Auto-complete would be great but not required.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!


#2

I quite like brackets as there are a lot of extensions for it (and its free).

Of course it doesn’t have the file transfer facilities of DW and yes DW is impossibly slow for large files and almost unusable.


#3

Visual Studio Code wins market share by a long shot. It’s a great app.


#4

Thanks guys!! Great choices? I couldn’t tell at first glance but will both of these allow me to manage multiple sites/projects?


#5

Yes, Visual Studio Code does it by Folder, so you can load/open a folder that pertains to a given project/site per instance you have open. (IIRC)

I haven’t used Brackets in a LONG time, but I think it operates under the same notion.


#6

how do you “connect” a folder (project) to the web server? Like entering FTP user/pass etc?


#7

That is kind of an anti-pattern applications like Dreamweaver allowed. You should be running things locally in almost all situations. Run things like docker or vagrant to create yourself a local server.

You can do FTP syncs and things like that with VSC, but it’s usually more hassle than it’s worth.


#8

Thank you… So how do you guys edit code on the fly? You save locally and then upload?


#9

Save locally. Test locally. Then upload (once fully tested).


#10

I prefer an IDE called PSPad, a freeware multi-functional editor for Windows.

It can be highly customized and has all features mentioned in this thread. One not mentioned is the code reformat tool I haven’t found in any comparable Linux editor. (I’m on Linux since many years, but continue using PSPad in Wine)


#11

@Erik_J In my 20yrs or so of doing this, I’ve never seen an editor that didn’t include code reformatting.

I use Prettier in conjunction with ESLint now and have VSCode setup to reformat on save, so I’ve pretty much just abandoned caring about formatting while I’m writing code.


#12

Thanks for the tip!

I mean reformat code I’ve imported in the editor to a standard format to be easier to read and edit, like compressed CSS or HTML from websites.

Or compress html or css for less weight or remake the css into one line ruleblocks.

Maybe I’ve missed the plugins avaiable for other apps. :slight_smile:


#13

VSC has Format Document, which I think is natively installed. Sublime Text, I think needed a plugin. The stuff I used before ST2 had them natively built in for HTML/CSS. I think Notepad++ called it Beautify and gEdit has a plugin.

As far as minifying and what not, that’s usually done with a build step. It’s not really the job of the IDE.


#14

You are right, I was too categorical, I remember the Beautify in Notepad++ and maybe some other I tried. I try to check out all free to use editors that I come across for Linux but there are very few I like or being so flexible to use.

PSPad was the first I really liked after the too heavy Eclipse and some other Windows IDE when I started playing with code.


#15

VSC works natively on Linux and runs like a dream.


#16

Thanks but no. :slight_smile:

Sorry, I don’t use any of the Microsoft products I can avoid, like VSC.


#17

Well you wouldn’t expect it’s from Redmond… other than that you have to restart it each time you installed an extension. :-D


#18

To each their own, but they certainly aren’t the MS of the 90’s. VSC is head and shoulders above the rest of the alternatives right now.


#19

But but, it sounds like a successor to Visual Basic. :stuck_out_tongue:

Anyway, since long I’ve stopped support Microsoft by using their products, whether it’s bought or built.


#20

Try VSCodium. It’s VS Code with all of the M$ telemetry stripped out.