Page title with or without the site name

I seen several sites where the page title does not contain the site title. An example are articles here at sitepoint: http://articles.sitepoint.com/article/get-clients-to-call-you.

The page title is: 3 Simple Steps to Get Clients to Call You

… and not: 3 Simple Steps to Get Clients to Call You - Sitepoint Articles

My question is: is there a real difference between these, in term of SEO?

Frankly, I haven’t seen a measurable difference. Most of the time, I do something like:
mysite.com | Title of Page

Anyone else have any input?

putting the domain name first makes a mess of your browser’s history stack, as well as bookmarks

and it’s not as though you actually need the domain name for seo (hint: you don’t)

I don’t think there is any significant difference. You just need to make sure that there are keywords in your title.

Hi,

it is not necessary to include the sitename in title part,but you can include the company or service name at the end of the title.it won’t effects in to website SEO.
manily you need to concetrate on visitors.

Regards,
raghavendra

I personally prefer something like “Site Title | Title of Page” as when I have a dozen browser windows open I want to be able to see at a glance which window is open with the site that I want to look at.

In terms of SEO, it’s unlikely to make any difference at all - search engines can tell what website each page is on, and they don’t need that repeated in the page title. Especially when the website name doesn’t actually convey anything about the content (if you didn’t read ‘Sitepoint’, would you ever guess that it was a website about website development?).

However, in terms of general usability, there are huge advantages in including the website name in the page title. Page titles are generally used for three main purposes:

[LIST][]To identify pages in search engine results[]To identify pages in bookmarks/favourites[*]To select open pages (eg taskbat, Alt+Tab etc)
[/LIST]
In each of those cases, people will often latch onto the site name quicker than the page title, so it is very useful to present them with both.

Branding!

If you’ve got an optimized title with good CTR (keywords included in a proper alluring manner, and not blasted manner), then you should include your company name for “branding” purposes. You’d definitely like the people to remember you even after they shut down their PC or when referring them to others.

Regards,

I feel the most important part of a pages title is that it sells well on a search results page.

It’s your most prominent text to get someone’s attention, and get them to click on your result.

You get about 65 characters to do this.

Quite often people omit the company name or site title as this does not help sell (maybe for brand recognition in some cases). One theory of dropping the site name maybe to help focus the title on the targeted keywords.

I don’t see any reason to include the domain name. Just wasting some valuable advertising space.

keywords in the title can help as these get highlighted if they are part of the search made. It is still believed that search engines put a lot of weight to keywords in the title, and the closer to the start the better.

If I have multiple parts to my title, I always put the most significant part first. Its more likely to get spotted and helps distinguish a page better in the browser where the tab text is quite short. e.g.

Page Title | Category | Company Name | Location

It is not necessary to add domain name title. You need to cover our main business keywords.

I’ve generally found that the SEO cheat sheet at SEOmoz offered sound advice. They advise that the title is simply the term you are targeting. That of course assumes that you have good content that is related to that term.

It seems like we just had this debate here a few weeks ago. At the end of the day I tend to look at the subject with a variety of factors:

  1. Your page title in the SERPs
    This makes a big difference. Believe it or not, most people don’t pay attention to the little green text in Google that displays the domain name of the website. As developers we might take notice but the general user does not. Having your website name in the page title can make a difference between the average user clicking through or not.

  2. Your page title in the browser window
    How often do you really pay attention to your browser title? Yeah, neither do I. This one can pretty much be disregarded.

  3. Your page title in a bookmark/history
    There are two different types of users when it comes to bookmarks: users with organized bookmarks and then the rest of us. If the user has an organized bookmark library then they’ll probably name the bookmark appropriately. On the other hand, the rest of us will just keep the page title the same and if the website name isn’t in there we could forget what the bookmark is for. Does the rest of the page tile adequately describe the page? If you answered yes then I don’t think there’s much threat of not having the website name in the page title.

  4. Your page title in terms of SEO
    This is pretty much a non-issue. Google knows which website it’s crawling without relying on the website name in the page title.