Dev Environment

Hi,

I’m not sure if I am on the right place to ask, my apologies if I am in the wrong section.

Is it fine to setup an OSX VMWare station on a Windows 8 for development?
Like if I will do Rails development then I’ll just use the OSX for that and for other stuff for Windows 8? I’m not sure if I am making sense here. Lol
Any help will be greatly appreciated, thanks.

Why not just install Rails on Windows and skip the VM?

I have two Ruby installs, one in Windows and one in VirtualBox because it works with an app that needs *nix

Last I knew (years ago now) there were some (minor?) differences between the Windows and *nix versions. Do you know if most if not all of the differences have been taken care of?

As far as I can tell, it has been relatively smooth sailing. Still run into issues with gems once in a while, but I’ve never came across any serious issues that couldn’t be resolved.
I think it’s mainly due to simply better tools available today than Rails’ early years on Windows. I use the Rails installer (http://railsinstaller.org/en), but Bitnami’s stack is very good too.

Main reason I would try to avoid a VM if possible is that Ruby is already slow as molasses when run on Windows…I can only imagine how it would run through a VM. Just a lot of hassle…I think it would be better to just install Linux outright for a Rails platform; probably uses the same (or less) amount of space, and everything will run fast and how it’s supposed to,

Yes, it is slow on Windows.

I haven’t tried uninstalling-reinstalling everything yet, but it may be due to the way Windows deals with shared files.
https://meta.discourse.org/t/display-speed-of-the-page-of-discourse-is-very-slow/17775/6?u=mittineague

sam Sam Saffron co-founder
Windows is fine, I use it and my dev speed is spectacular

The issue is having source code live in a Windows share as opposed to inside the vm

Unfortunately the tutorial I followed didn’t mention where to install the various apps or how it might effect things operating on Windows so I did “best guess”. Things do work, but v…e…r…y s…l…o…w…l…y at least on initial startup, not so bad after that.

Very strange…I read the link; it shouldn’t be THAT slow. Are you running on an old computer?
The programs themselves run quite fast for me; when I said that Rails is slow as molasses on Windows, I was talking more about the execution speed of the code. I first noticed it when I copied over some source to my Windows machine from Fedora…one particulary large query that grabbed geo coordinates then performed a levenshtein calculation ran in .032 seconds in Linux, but the exact same script took over half a second in Windows.

I don’t think that’s something that will change until Ruby focuses more on Windows platform; if that ever happens…
but try the Bitnami Rails stack. Maybe you’ll have better luck with that

To be fair to Ruby, I don’t think it’s Ruby that is the main reason for the very slow initial startup.

Discourse is to a great extent an Ember JavaScript app. I haven’t checked into it much, but I’m fairly sure the very slow initial startup is a result of loading a lot of what has tradionally been server-side to client-side so that Ember can do it’s thing.

So that probably wasn’t the best link to use as an example.
What I meant as the key point of it is that where things are installed to could affect Windows behavior.

As for my other Ruby scripts, they seem only a wee bit slower (similar to how my localhost Discourse runs after the initial startup), not painfully slow.

You should check out vagrant – it is a great way to wrap up the VM so it is transportable, scripted and repeatable. It also features facilities to share folders so you can run the code on a vm of the right flavor but you can still edit from your host OS of choice.

Insofar as performance goes I haven’t had any issues of it though we haven’t done much heavy rails development to be perfectly honest.