Java filters

Hey guys, one of my clients has a websites mostly programmed using Java, therefore filters are made the same. Do you think that this solution is good enough for Google or should I be worried about duplicate content and pagination when it comes to these type of filters. I know that URL for Google ends where lies hashtag, but it still seems pretty bad. What do you think?

Welcome to the forums, @fipsty17.

Have you read Google’s guidelines for this?

https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/76329?hl=en

https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en

Hey,

thanks for quick response. Yes, I did, but they weren´t really helpful in this case, since there is nothing about filters. Honestly, from stuff I went through this solution seems pretty harmless and I have to admit that using Java to provide it is quite clever. Having said that, I still wanted to hear a third person´s opinion.

Also, I corrected the link in my post, sorry for getting it wrong, I just wanted everyone to see it as it is.

In that case, you should format it as code, not as a link:

https://casino.guru/top-online-casinos-2018#gg_1=on&mwc=2&wlc=2&sort_by=GURU_RECOMMENDED_DESC&paginate_by=1

(A backtick ` before and after the URL is the way to do that.)

You are questioning the decisions of past developers when you don’t even know the difference yourself between Java and JavaScript it seems. I find that highly suspicious in regards to your qualifications for making any relevant analysis of previous work.

Despite you’re not being familiar with the correct terminology, you can have as many identical pages with different fragments as you need to have. If you would rather not have search engines decide which to show use

<link href="http://example.com/mainpage" rel="canonical">

In any case, you have much more serious to worry about eg… mark-up like this
</head> <body> <head ...

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