Is backbone still relevant or is there an alternative?


#1

I just read an answer to what’s the best way to learn JS, but it has been writen in 2015

If you want a Framework to get you started–to act as a structural element as you work on the core stuff, try Backbone, because it’s the simplest of the ones most-frequently used. You can use it and still focus mostly on core Javascript principals. Whereas Angluar and React start moving you off the rail, into their own idiosyncratic workflows. source

I was wondering is Backbone still “hot right now” if not is there something else that “you can use it and still focus mostly on core Javascript principals”

The article also mentions RequireJS - is that relevant or not


#2

Hi relio,

There’s nothing wrong with Backbone, but it’s an older library and has fallen out of use compared with libraries such as Angular, React and Vue. One key area of difference is that Backbone is designed for building applications using the MVC pattern, whereas most of the current frameworks have adopted component-based architecture.

Backbone is still a nice little library, with plenty to teach you both from building small apps and looking through its source code (it’s considered to be a small and well-written code-base).

If you’re interested in learning marketable skills, though, I’d recommend going with either React or Vue. React skills are in high-demand right now (and are likely to be for some time), although the learning curve can be steep, especially for newer developers. Vue.js is gaining in popularity, and has a shallower learning curve, and is suitable for projects of any size. Both have CLI tools for quickly getting new projects set up easily (create-react-app and Vue CLI respectively).

IMO, RequireJS is no longer relevant, as Webpack has replaced it as the go-to tool for module bundling.


#3

Thanks

From all the research I got a similar feel - that I shouldn’t bother with Backbone. But I like

I might give it few hours


#4

Don’t. Learn Vue. Much better investment of your time.

Not that there is something wrong with backbone, it’s just not used anymore


#5

I guess it depends on how much time you have and your reasons. As long as you look at older obsolete code for historical knowledge and with no delusions of using it as a tool, it can help to give an idea of where current practice had its beginnings and alternate approaches to handling common tasks.

Often that means unless you are a hobbyist you are so busy trying to keep up with the new you don’t have time to spend on the old. It’s difficult enough to keep skill sets marketable as it is.