Iq 70-80 can I master html5 and css3?

English is my second language.

I have taken iq test to psychologist two times. One when I was young, and one when I’m was a adult, both time I got something around 70. The test had 4 or 5 topics like understanding of words, memorising and something I have forgotten. One topic was 90, the rest 70-80.

I have tried to learn html5 once before, quit after a couple of weeks because I didn’t feel any progress at all.

For around a month I started again. First starting with a 10 hour video at youtube, finished 6 hour and started with a html5 and css3 in my language, but I still watch a lot youtube content in English everyday.
I did pay for a course that had Html5 and CSS3, lasting 13 hours with tasks after every chapter. I have finished html5 and 70% of css3. I have also bought a high school book in my native language that introduces html5, css3 and javascript to beginners. I have worked through 2 chapters now, it has only 3 about html5 and css3.

I have been working over 100 hours 60-70 watching, rest try to solve tasks and build websites (they look horrible, need to cheat by copy codes to get it good). For example I don’t understand simple things like why write classes"navbar-button" navbar-brand" “navbar-nav” “navbar-item” “section-footer” “footer-hero” etc.
why can’t I just call the classes “hello1” “hello2” “hello3”. And I don’t understand simple things like should this be inn section or main. How to move a link that it displays in the upper page.

I have a fascination for programming, but now I feel like it’s a hopeless project. Low iq and I need to be self studying. I really, really need to feel some mastery very soont!

Does somebody maybe have a tip or two that I haven’t think about, and last is it possible for me to understand html5 and css3? And I don’t mean basic, I would like to understand it very,very well, before I jump over to javascript. Maybe someone have heard about people like me with borderline iq, be a programmer, that would at least tell me it isn’t impossible, still I’m stupid.

Well you have learnt a second language, and your English isn’t too bad. So there is some hope for you learning.

You may name your classes as anything you like. But it is a good idea to make the names meaningful, so it is easier for you, or anyone else working with the code to understand. It is usually considered best to use a name that describes what an element is, as opposed to describing its appearance.

2 Likes

What is your purpose for learning these scripting languages?

Do you want a job in the field?

You said, “I have a fascination for programming” but you don’t seem to be enjoying the process of learning. I have a fascination with scripting, but I’ve never excelled.

Whether you want to go on or not will depend on why you do it. You may want to get an ordinary job you can do and code on the side for your own enrichment. From what I’ve read, don’t let any IQ score determine your life.

1 Like

My first purpose is to get a good knowledge of html5 and css3, and then javascript, if that goes well, a job.

I like it when I understand it and feel some progress, but when I have been studying around 100 hours and it feels like I haven’t moved any forward since my first 10 hours my motivation get lower. I think thats normal, if you read, write and watch something for 90 hours and haven’t understand nothing.

The tech industry (web design/web development) is a practical profession. It takes work and experience to learn what you do…the mistakes are as valuable as the successes IF you learn from the mistakes and improve your process.

Find courses which have a final end product. Use those courses as your foundation for learning. Then, try to come up with something to build a unique product for, and try to apply the lessons you learned in the courses. It can be a hobby you have passion for, or a fan site, or some sort of thing you think “I wish I had an easy way to…” and go out and build a tool that does that.

And it’s a continuous process - the work I do now has NOTHING to do with the work I went to college for. The basic tenets are the same, but the language and approaches are completely different.

2 Likes

To be honest but if you are some kind of a “slower” learner, i would recommend not to use videos. Videos have a fix speed and you have to rewind many times if you didn’t understand it directly.
Use books (or online readable courses). Here you can define the tempo which fulfills your needs.

3 Likes

The difficulties you are having do seem quite general. The forums are better at helping with quite specific problems.
Though you do mention some more specific problems. I already referred to class names.

There are plenty of on-line references for HTML which describe what the various elements are used for, eg:-

These may help in choosing how to structure your HTML with the various elements.
If you set yourself a task of building a page, or site from scratch, any time you encounter a problem, that you cannot figure out yourself, you can then ask a more specific question about the particular problem you are facing.

Correct. It is a dangerous thing to let others determine your fate by telling you, you are x, y or z and giving you the notion that you cannot achieve. That is when someone may lose hope and not even want to try. But people achieve by effort, regardless of who you are. No effort, no achievement.

I’ve been doing it long enough now that it’s easy to forget how hard it seemed in the beginning. But I think it’s a learning curve that starts very steep, then gets easier. I now see HTML as a very simple language, which I believe it is compared to other web languages. CSS is a lot more difficult to understand initially, but when you know the fundamentals, you can make it as simple or complex as you like.
As for Javascript, I’m only really a beginner at that myself, as programming wise I focused more attention on the server side. But programming is another level up again. I think Javasript would probably be a good choice to learn after you master HTML and CSS.

2 Likes