How to "ping" my home ISP WiFi from work

From work, I would like to be able to test if my home router is working.

Google search words tried have all failed to return a satisfactory solution :frowning:

I use a service no-ip for this. I run its client at home, which lets me have a DNS name, and then I can ping the DNS entry, if it gets a response, it is up, if it fails or times out there is an issue

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I would like to just be able to use ping without any local installation.

My friend has developed an IOT temperature monitoring device which requires the user to connect to his local WiFi. I have sent my WiFi connection details to my friend in England and would like him to ping my home WiFi to ensure the details are correct.

If it is possible to validate the connection the base unit can be setup remotely and the customer just needs to connect the batteries.

Well you don’t have to install their client, you can still use No-IP, but you may have to update the IP address it points to if you are not on a static IP when your ISP changes it.

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The local setup, which I am trying to avoid, requires SSID, connection name and password.

Is the SSID something like 192.168.1.42 or is it the allocated ISP’s IP Adress?

I have sent a screen dump of my WiFi connection details to my friend in England and he thinks the details maybe sufficient to setup the device. I was hoping for my friend to ping and verify my local connection before he posts the device.[quote=“cpradio, post:4, topic:247919, full:true”]
Well you don’t have to install their client, you can still use No-IP, but you may have to update the IP address it points to if you are not on a static IP when your ISP changes it.
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Typically SSID refers to your WIFI broadcast name. Not an IP address. For an outside connection to communicate with your network, it would need to know your external facing IP address, the one allocated by your ISP. You may also have to setup a Port Forwarding Rule on your router/modem to redirect to the device that should receive said request.

Example:

Let’s say I have an IOT that has an internal network IP address of 192.168.1.42 and it is looking for communication on port 443. I would setup a Port Forwarding rule to redirect incoming traffic on port 443 to 192.168.1.42.

The outside party sending the request would send the request to your ISP assigned IP address, let’s say that is 76.152.249.42 over port 443.

Your router will receive it, see it is for port 443 and redirect it to your internal device at 192.168.1.42 based on the port forwarding route that was assigned previously.

None of that has anything to do with the WIFI broadcast ID though. Which can only be utilized if you are within range of the WIFI router.

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