How did you spend your time today, Marc?

Explaining to this guy why I hate changing requirements and how to make idiotproof(ish) functions so a layman can use them…

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for reference, this was one of my wife’s christmas presents to me this year… a bigger rubber duck, specifically to debug with (or as she puts it, ‘he talks to it’). It’s about… 6" from beak to tail, and I have not yet given it a name.

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Do government contractors get big profits from changing requirements?

I have a bear who fulfills much the same functions. :slight_smile: He’s so good at it that my other half nicknamed him “TechnoBear”. When I joined the forums and needed a username, I looked to him for inspiration, as usual, and he generously offered to share! :lol:

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I wouldnt know, not being nor working for a government contractor.

Since everything else the government does is heavily overpriced, I would say so. :smiley:

I don’t think changing requirments is at all specific to government work, or to the world of web development. Nor to I believe it is gainful to anyone.
I think changing requirements is very common to many clients in many professions. It comes form a lack of imagination or vision, where people don’t really know what they want until you do something and show it to them. Then they have something to pick apart, criticise and tell you what they don’t like about it and would like to change.
I say it’s not gainful, because working this way is very inefficient, slow and tedious, especially if you have to go through several itereations of ‘changes’, much time and effort can be wasted. I guess it may work if you are wise enough to have a very solid contract which enables you to charge for all the moving of goalposts.

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To be completely fair to the person who’s made the requirement change, it wasnt his requirement to begin with, it’s old(er) code that met the original requirements, but does not allow for the situation that now presents itself.

(He says, trying to explain without being too specific.)

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