Cold call and sales letters

Anyone know a good place to get templates or examples for cold call and sales letters for a service based company? I’m not happy with the ones that I currently use, and Microsoft Templates does not have a good one. I’d love some from an accounting firm perspective.

I need to generate more clients so that I can move out of my home office.

Thanks in advance.

For proposal/contract templates I like proposal kit.

I think that using templates for sales calls and services is kind of trite. A better idea is to write your own, so I would look for examples rather than templates.

For creative ideas try:

http://www.ideasiteforbusiness.com/

They’ve got lots of little gimmicks, creative ideas, and sample sales letters.

In terms of cold calls. I wouldn’t do it. Not my style. I think that networking is FAR FAR more effective, particularly in this business.

MaFunk,

Thank you for the link. I agree, I would rather create my own letter, but a sample of someone’s proven letter would be a huge plus. I’ve been networking, but the problem that I run into is someone already has a CPA firm or in house bookkeeper/accountant. I’m trying to reach out to those companies who are just starting up or in the want ads.

Thanks again.

Don’t knock cold call letters or ( Intro Letters ) they are one of the classics in any type of b2b (business 2 business ) services. There are a few things to consider, like any type of advertising, the copy and the message, the offer (#1 reason why people respond) and or the call-to-action after your best offer ever! What action do you want them to take?

Example: To take advantage of this limited time offer, pick up the phone and call for more information OR Find more about this offer by visiting us @ www.yourdomain.com or Email us to receive more on this offer. Or for the oldie but goldie… Just stop by our store this week.

Direct Mail Strategies…Make Your Message Stand Out
Here’s a test: Given the choice, which would you open first - an ordinary flat envelope or one with a noticeable bulge?

   If you picked the bulkier envelope, you're not alone. A research study at Baylor University found that when a promotional product was added to a direct mail piece, response rates rose as much as 75%!

   Adding a dimensional product such as a magnet or bookmark pen to your mailing is just one way to get noticed. Another strategy is printing on both sides of the envelope since there's a 50% chance the mail will sit face down on a table or a desk. One psychology publication grabbed attention and new subscribers with the phrase, "Do you close the bathroom door even if you're the only one at home?" on the flip side of their mailer.

   No matter how artfully designed your direct mail piece, the only thing that matters is the response. Some of the most successful marketers rely on tried-and-true-techniques to help ensure a strong response.

   Consider these suggestions:

   Mail Three Times - Try a mailing blitz; three mailings in 10 days. For most companies, the third mailing captures the best response.

   Get Help - It sounds elementary but mistakes do happen. All it takes is one misspelled word, name, or address to spoil your promotion. Let a friend, spouse, or co-worker proofread your letter. Remember, you only get one chance to make a first impression!

   Make an Incredible Offer - It's hard to beat a free offer for increasing response rates. Try to offer prospects something free with no strings attached. While it may cost a little, the payoff might be the beginning of a long-term client relationship.

   A creative delivery approach can turn a good promotion into a great one. One of my clients a leasing company promoted the grand opening of a new office building with plastic boomerangs during a local parade. Their address was printed on the top of the boomerang while pertinent details were featured on the bottom. Another firm used logo'd sports drink bottles as the mailer, stuffed with a packet of drink mix and a message inside.

I’m using a mailshot campaign and was fortunate enough with the first 20 to have two ring me within hours of receiving the letter . An exception maybe - but a boost to the morale!

virtual-logo - Get Help - It sounds elementary but mistakes do happen. All it takes is one misspelled word, name, or address to spoil your promotion. Let a friend, spouse, or co-worker proofread your letter. Remember, you only get one chance to make a first impression!

I agree with this comment as well!!

Hey Joshua,

I have to agree that writing your own letter/script is the way to go, and I’d recommend reading “The Ultimate Sales Letter” by Dan S. Kennedy and also “The Copywriter’s Handbook: A Step-By-Step Guide to Writing Copy That Sells” by Bob Bly.

Keep in mind that it’s not good enough to write a great sales letter, you also need to be creative enough to have people open and read them too. I really think postcards are a great tool to use to get the word out about a business, and if you can offer a free download or something from your website in your mailing, you’ll probably manage a better response than if you mailed a typical business letter.

Good luck, and let us know how you make out!

Steve