Jason Beaird is a designer and front-end developer with over ten years of experience working on a wide range of award-winning web projects. With a background in graphic design and a passion for web standards, he’s always looking for accessible ways to make the Web a more beautiful place. When he’s not pushing pixels in Photoshop or tinkering with markup, Jason loves sharing his passion for the Web with others.

Jason's articles

  1. A Brief Introduction to Text Replacement with SIFR

    Right now, one of the most popular options for text replacement is sIFR (pronounced “siffer”), which is an acronym for Scalable Inman Flash Replacement — a technology that allows designers to use Flash and JavaScript to apply their choice of fonts to headings.

  2. DesignFestival: A Brief Look at Screen Resolutions

    In comparison to the fixed-versus-fluid debate , the argument about designing for particular screen resolutions has been quite tame these past few years. When designers say that a site is designed, or optimized, for a particular screen resolution, they’re actually talking about the resolution of the viewer’s monitor. In the past, the screen resolution debate was focused on whether our designs should still accommodate monitor resolutions of 800×600 without displaying a horizontal scrollbar. According to W3Schools’ screen resolution statistics , in January 2010, 1% of web users had their screens set to 800×600 pixels (down from 4% in 2009), 20% had their resolutions set at 1024×768 pixels (down from 36%), and a whopping 76% of visitors had a resolution higher than 1024×768

  3. DesignFestival: Resizing: Fixed, Fluid, or Responsive Layouts

    Back when we were looking at layout blocks done with pencil and paper , I explained that the outer rectangle we were designing within was the containing block. In print design, the containing block is a physical object like a business card or a billboard. On the Web, our container is the browser window.

  4. Resizing: Fixed, Fluid, or Responsive Layouts

    In print design, the containing block is a physical object like a business card or a billboard. On the Web, our container is the browser window. Should the design fill the browser window, or should it have a set width? Let’s take a look.

  5. DesignFestival: 3 Text Spacing Principles Every Designer Needs to Know

    Many typographic decisions are based on spacing. This is something that has always been true with printed type, and became applicable to web type with the advent of CSS. Regardless of whether we’re talking about using type for print or for the Web, there are two directions in which we can control spacing — horizontally, and vertically.

  6. 3 Text Spacing Principles Every Designer Needs to Know

    Many typographic decisions are based on spacing. This is something that has always been true with printed type, and became applicable to web type with the advent of CSS. Regardless of whether we’re talking about using type for print or for the Web, there are two directions in which we can control spacing — horizontally, […]

  7. DesignFestival: A Few Design Trends

    If you’re feeling so overwhelmed by the many resources available that even to contemplate starting a morgue file for inspiration is beyond you, take a few minutes to browse through those sites. Look past the colors and textures to the boxes that make up the layout, and try to identify standard ideas and design trends. By doing this, I’ve started to notice a few trends that seem to be emerging in website layouts. Navigationless Magazine Style On the Web, we tend to be a lot more goal-oriented and consume information in bits and pieces

  8. A Few Design Trends

    Having look at principles of layouts, emphasis, and unity recently, let’s briefly look past the colors and textures to the boxes that make up the layout, and try to identify standard ideas and design trends. By doing this, I’ve started to notice a few trends that seem to be emerging in website layouts.

  9. DesignFestival: Bread-and-butter Layouts and Inspiration

    Most of what we’ve talked about thus far has been design theory. Theory’s helpful, but it can only take us so far towards understanding why some ideas work—and others don’t—in a website’s design. In my opinion, examples and practice are much more valuable. Most academic graphic design programs include a curriculum that’s rich in art history and fine art