Table border value less than 1px: impossible or quite otherwise?

I should be very grateful if anyone cared to suggest a method of making the table accept the border value less than 1px, say, 0.5px. When I try to enter any such value into the table property inspector in Macromedia Dreamweaver, a warning appears to the effect that the value cannot be between 0 and 1, and when I do put that value (0.5px) by way of CSS, it does not display in my browser at all. Is there a way to bypass this obstacle and make a fine-looking (very)thin-bordered table?

He He… Good one.

Since the pixel (picture element) is the smallest displayable quantity on screen, that would be like asking for half a hydrogen atom to display the same qualities as a hydrogen atom. How do you get a half proton and half electron to exist? :stuck_out_tongue:

Lets say that you have a black background (#000), and have a green border (#0f0), you actually use a third of a pixel. And if you then use a darker green border (#060) it will look like it is even thinner. :wink:

So, bascially use nothing but primaries? That would only activate one phosphor in the triad and depending on the monitor might give some effect.

If you have a trinitron monitor, it’s a slit, not a dot and therefore just as tall as the next primary phosphor. I’ll have to look at my monitor at work. That means that horizontal lines will be wider than vertical lines if you use a primary color only.

Well put! Im laughing way to much… :rofl:

Hello

1px there is no smaller :rofl:

set it on td borders by CSS,
or use the cellspacing with background-color trick


<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
	<title>12345 12345 12345 12345 12345 </title>
	<style type="text/css">
	body{
	background-color:#f5deb3;
	}
	.contentLayer,.contentLayerx{
	position:absolute;
	top:10px;
	left:10px;
	}
	.contentLayerx{
	left:300px;
	}
	table{
	background-color:#ffffcc;
	}
	td,th{
	font-family:Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
	color:#808000;
	font-size:10px;
	padding: 5px;
	text-align: left;
	vertical-align: text-top;
	font-style: italic;
	border-color: #39c;
	border-width: 1px 1px 0 0;
	border-style: solid;
	}
	.hia{height:20px;}
	.hib{height:30px;}
	.hic{height:40px;}
	
	th{
	font-size:12px;
	color:#000000;
	font-weight:900;
	}
	.cb,.cc,.cd{
	border-width: 1px 1px 1px 0;
	}
	.h,.a,.b{
	border-width: 1px 1px 0 1px;
	}
	.c{
	border-width: 1px 1px 1px 1px;
	}
	.ac{
	border-color: #ff0000 #ff0000;
	}
	.bc{
	border-color: #ff0000 #09c;
	}
	.ab{
	border-color: #09c #ff0000;
	}
	.b,.cd,.hc{
	background-color: #f4a460;
	color: #ffffff;
	} /* */
	table#pricesx{
	background-color:#39c;
	
	}
	#pricesx td, #pricesx th{
	color:#000000;
	border-width: 0 0 0 0;
	background-color:#ffffcc;
	}
	#pricesx th{
	color:#000000;
	}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="contentLayer">
<table cellspacing="0" id="prices">
<tr>
<th class="h">12345</th>
<th class="hb">12345</th>
<th class="hc">12345</th>
<th class="hd">12345</th>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="a hia">12345</td>
<td class="ab">12345</td>
<td class="ac">12345</td>
<td class="ad">12345</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="b hib">12345</td>
<td class="bb">12345</td>
<td class="bc">12345</td>
<td class="bd">12345</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="c hic">12345</td>
<td class="cb">12345</td>
<td class="cc">12345</td>
<td class="cd">12345</td>
</tr>
</table>
</div>
<div class="contentLayerx">
<table cellspacing="1" id="pricesx">
<tr>
<th>12345</th>
<th>12345</th>
<th>12345</th>
<th>12345</th>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="hia">12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="hib">12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="hic">12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
<td>12345</td>
</tr>
</table>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Lets say that you have a black background (#000), and have a green border (#0f0), you actually use a third of a pixel. And if you then use a darker green border (#060) it will look like it is even thinner.

Well, for this to have any validity, you will have to drive the display at it’s native display resolution so that 1 pixel = 1 triad, (have a new well focused monitor if crt) and use only pure red, pure blue or pure green.

For LCD displays, this is pretty straight forward as displays look pretty ugly at anything other than native display.

If you are driving your 1024 x 768 crt monitor at 800 x 600, then 1 pixel primary color can be 2 - 3 phosphor dots, ie 1 pixel is several phosphor triads being activated as the “pixel” is a function of the operating system, not the physical attribute of the monitor. On this monitor, only the green line seems thinner due to the above. Still have to try it on the Trinitron to see what I get there.

So basically, you might be able to display a thinner line with primary colors if the end viewer’s equipment allows for that.