Regarding Website Bounce Rate

Hey All,

Bounce rate of my website is increasing from last few days. I want to know what is the minimum time to stay on a webpage so that Google don’t count it as bounce.

Now days my web’s bounce rate is increased up to 80%.
Also I would like to share a point… Once I check all visits deeply. I found that one visitor visit website only for 18 seconds and bounce rate was 0 for that visitor.

Now I guess there are some changes in Google policies… Please share your view about it…

Thanks

I just posted these in another thread…
Great bounce rate explanations in these vids w/ Avinash Kaushik the Digital Marketing Evangelist for Google:
The older presentation vid with stats:

//youtu.be/ppgfjo6IIf4

Updated video from 2012 describing bounce rate

//youtu.be/KDsfVkUPhEU

There is no minimum time to stay on web to calculate the bounce rate. Bounce rate is a percentage of web page visit where your customer just click the link found in advertising/organic result/paid listing/ etc and closed before visiting the other pages of website.

Check the source, identify the visitors. Check whether you have made any changes recently in your landing page that resulted in high bounce rate.

This is just because that visitor visits more than one web page in a go.

For bounce rate, there is no changes. Changes always happen to make SEO more easily and hence check out the above stuff and then come back. This may help you so far.

If the visits from a source is giving you 100% bounce rate then its good to remove your link from their or stop advertising there if you are doing so.

Hope this helps.

Bounce rate increases because visitors visiting your website doesn’t find the relevant information they are looking for, what you’re experiencing might be as a result of the fact that the SEO tags and keywords didn’t match the information on your website. Search engines have a method of knowing your bounce rate, and when they observe that it’s quite high, they assume people aren’t finding what they search for on your website. This moves your website down searching results, hence the drop of visitors from search engines.
My advice should be to write content that matches your SEO better. Don’t overuse SEO just for the sake of getting visitors from searches. Content will always be more important.

Don’t waste your time worrying about bounce rates. It’s not important to Google, and it’s not important to you.

What counts is whether or not you “convert” your visitors. By that I mean, whether you sell them your product, or sign them up for your service, or convert them to your religion, or do whatever it is that your site aims to do. Whether you do that in 18 seconds or 18 minutes doesn’t matter one jot.

Google doesn’t care how long a visitor stays on your site either. If the visitor finds what they are looking for in 18 seconds, that might indicate a successful visit, which in turn would increase the value of your site. Equally, if they spend 18 minutes exploring your site in depth, that might also be seen to be of value. Google isn’t able to distinguish those cases, and it doesn’t try.

Finally, in general Google has no way of measuring bounce rates. How does it know much time passes between a visitor arriving at your site and then going to another site? It might be able to measure the time between the visitor arriving at your site, and the same visitor returning to Google. But it’s got no way of knowing what the visitor does in between. Or for that matter, it doesn’t know if the visitor has kept your page open in another tab, with the intention of returning to it later.

Chasing bounce rates is like chasing page rank, or Alexa ratings, or the number of incoming links. Don’t waste your time on these arbitrary metrics. Focus instead on building the best possible and on giving your visitors the best possible experience.

Mike

I wouldn’t go so far as to say bounce rate was meaningless. Assuming that a conversion requires two page loads, which it usually will, anyone who bounces hasn’t converted, and probably hasn’t engaged either unless they got everything they needed on that one page. If you have a high bounce rate and low conversions, that suggests that your site isn’t giving the right first impression or the information scent isn’t strong enough - and once you’ve identified those problems, you can have a go at fixing them. This is why it’s important not only to collect data but to know what to do with it.

What if the website doesn’t have any goals?

Not that I’m very experienced in this, but my guess is that bounce rate and time spent on the site are definitely not meaningless, especially if you don’t have any other or better indicator.

Good point. But I’m not sure I agree that a conversion necessarily requires two page loads. That might be true if the aim of the site is to take an order, or to get the visitor to sign up for something. But not, for example, if the aim is to have the user click on a PPC ad. In that case, a fast bounce might be the best outcome for the site operator.

That said, I agree that, in general, you want your users not to leave after only seeing one page. So if you measure bounce rate in terms of the number of pages that the visitor sees, that might be of some value. But the original question was about the time that the visitor spends on the site, with the implication that, the longer they stay, the more successful the site. I don’t see any logic in that. (By analogy, if you were running a bricks-and-mortar store, would you rather have a customer who rushes in, makes a purchase, and dashes off again; or one who spends 20 minutes browsing around and leaves without buying anything?)

Above all, my main point was that this has got nothing to do with Google. However you measure your bounce rate, Google has no way of knowing what the figure is (unless, perahps, you happen to be one of the minority of sites that uses Google Analytics), and so cannot use it in search ranking.

Hmm. Good question. My first thought would be to say, if it hasn’t any goals, why do you want the site to exist in the first place. But I suppose a better answer would be that every site has some goal, even if it’s only to serve as a training exercise for the webmaster - or even to boost the webmaster’s ego. But if your site really doesnt have a goal, then it’s hard to imagine why you would care who visits it or how long they stay.

Mike

If it is 80% then you need to take a serious steps:

  1. First check the keywords is they relevant to your landing pages for which they are ranking.
  2. Change the content if it is not informative and attractive.
  3. Add some videos and images slideshow which look attracive.
  4. Mention some interesting deals on the pages.
  5. Try to interlink your other pages of the same website, to engage your visitors on your website.

Hope it will help you.

The best solution to bounce rate is to put an embedded video in your webpage that is related on your page. You can get it from free from youtube. This will somehow hold your visitors to finish viewing it before leaving your page. I have experienced this before, but using this technique, my alexa ranking has also increased. Video is the best solution!

@moralezhub; Are you sure you aren’t confusing Exit Rate vs Bounce Rate ?

Do you really think that merely putting a video on your page is going to retain visitors who have no interest in your site or your product? And even if it does, so what? So they watch the video - and then they leave the page? What is the benefit is that?

You say this technique has increased your Alexa rating. If you get some sort of private satisfaction from a high Alexa rating, that’s fine. But it’s hard to see what tangible benefit it gives you.

Mike

The main reason which increases your bounce rate is the quality of the content. And the users didn’t get their desired information. If the information you provided is not relevant and if it is of no use for the user it will lead to the increase in the bounce rate. Time is not the major issue if the user come to your website and he or she is not going to the inner pages and directly leave the website by just visiting the home page is an increase in the bounce rate.

Great points all around. A webmaster’s main focus should always be to his/her users. If your users find the information and leave, then that is a successful visit.

Actual conversions are much more important than virtual statistics, even to Google. I am sure they take circumstances like that into consideration and do not automatically punish all sites with low high bounce rates.

HOW CAN YOU CONVERT IF YOUR BOUNCE RATE IS HIGH?
YES IT’S NOT IMPORTANT TO GOOGLE…NO ONE DISAGREES WITH YOU.
SO YOU ARE NOT WORRIED ABOUT BOUNCE RATE?

IF YOU ONLY HAVE THE CHANCE TO VIEW MY SITE, THEN I CAN PROVE TO YOU HOW MY ALEXA RATING IMPROVED FROM 12M to JUST 5M IN JUST 4-7 DAYS WHEN I STARTED PUTTING UP VIDEO’S IN MY CONTENT. IF YOU CAN ONLY READ MY ARTICLE ON HOW TO BUILD A ROCK-SOLID SEO FRIENDLY WEBSITE, ONLY THEN YOU CAN UNDERSTAND WHAT DOES IT MEAN.

AT LEAST A YOUTUBE VIDEO WHICH IS RELATED TO YOUR POST CAN MAKE A VISITOR CURIOUS ABOUT THE PAGE. MOST VISITORS ARE LAZY TO READ…

Off Topic:

@moralezhub - please STOP SHOUTING. If you have a point to make, that’s fine, but there is no need to use capital letters, which comes across as rather aggressive.

Why is your Alexa rating so important? How does your Alexa ranking contribute directly to your website’s profitability?

Will tricking uninteresting users to stay on your site longer actually benefit you?

@alabamaseo ; has a very good point here. Bounce rate isn’t a bad sign, perfect example of this would be an online directory which has nothing much to offer but information from a specific business or person. It also depends on what you offer, if your site is e-commerce and you need to convert from your traffic then there is a need for you to do something and lessen the bounce rate that is not converting to your campaign.

How precisely are you measuring and benchmarking your bounce rate?