Price for webpage

Hey.

I am wondering what to take for a 5 pages webpage (in euro)?
All the way it has been up to the client to tell what to do and what kind of webpage it should be.

Thanx in advance! :cool:

Well, seeing as family is involved, tell them the market price is XXX (and be genuine) and say that because it’s family, charge them 70% of that.

If things go bad, then let it go, between losing some money and having a family tension, I’d choose to lose the money every time.

We break it down into seperate components and quote on them seperately. (At least internally)

Start with design, how many concepts, whether the client is happy to sign off on just the front page, or whether they will want to see every page layed out in photoshop first.

Then you should have a fairly standard cost to built the template with the HTML supplied.

Then you decide whether it’s going to be flat HTML site or installed into a CMS.

Then you have a per page price for content population.

So your quote should roughly look like this:
Design: $XXX
CMS installation and config: $XXX
HTML/CSS: $XXX
5 pages: $50 x 5 = $XXX

And just work out what you want to earn per hour and then estimate how long each component will take.

Alex,
I agree. I was trying in all cases to over simply so as to describe the basic gist a price formula. In addition to what you mentioned ,there is the AESTHETIC DESIGN aspect, which has similar nuances to what you have mentioned.

BTW… we are saying the same thing…

some of the most complex websites imaginable were created to be exceptionally simplistic (in appearance and code). It’s a paradoxical factor which does tend to drive people off the edge.

Think of it this way. look at the Apple logo or the Target logo. Both beautiful trademarks, exemplary of what DESIGN and DESIGN OF LOGOS should be like. But they came froma mind that knew how to arrive at such materialistically effective marks. Now imagine Mr. Jobs telling the graphic designer that that logo is only worth $75 because how hard / how long could it have taken him “to draw that apple”

simply put,

TIME:
if the schedule of the work is such that i have to sacrifice other clients and perhaps living essentials … the hourly rate will be higher than if the schedule permits a leisurely pace for the same work. Here’s where skills comes in.

SKILL: Lets OVERSIMPLIFY this. Lets say you know how to type 200wph. How difficult is it to find someone with that typing skill? thus you can charge more… you could , essentially STILL charge twice as much as a person types 40wpm , still offer a cost effective alternatibve to a client and have TWICE the volume of work for yourself.
if you do the math:
since you type 5 times faster, a client would have to hire 5 typist to get the job done by the same deadline. That so your skill level in typing is worth more than the 5 other necessary to match you. you cut a deal. you charge TWICE the rate of someone who can type a fith as fast as you, for example. this means the clients saves $$ because he only has to hire you (same as paying for 2 40 wpm typists) you still could fit another job or so… at that rate you are earning 4x the amount of someone who types 40wpm/ while you can type 200wpm ( this is what I mean by skill /exp/talent etc… simply a level of efficiency)

COMPLEXITY of design should be self explanatory. But OVERSIMPLIFYING , again, for the sake of the example.

a page like this:

<body>
<div> <p>this is a page.</p></div>
</body>

is only HALF as complicated as this one:
<body>
<div> <p>this is a page.</p></div>
<div> <p>this is a page.</p></div>
</body>

something like this is even MORE complex:
is only HALF as complicated as this one:
<body>
<div class=“nav”>
<ul>
<li><a href=“#”>somelink</a></li>
<li><a href=“#”>somelink</a></li>
</ul>
</div>
<div> <p>this is a page.</p></div>
<div> <p>this is a page.</p></div>
</body>

and so forth.

this line of reasoning also prevents something, which admittedly I dont see a lot of anymore. but decades ago, you would see incredibly LOOOOOONG and rather mixed content pages. Thats because back then coders would post their charges based on pages ( a 5 page site, a 10 page site, and so forth). clients would try to squeeze all their info into as few pages as possible. Which:

  1. sucks for user navigation…
  2. still had the coder typing and coding large amount of content while the client claimed he had one done “one page” so it cant be “worth that much”

in other words DIFFERENT PAGES are worth DIFFERENT amounts. This actually is the same of ALL things, but for some reason when it comes to web, graphic or creative writing work… some client will try to pull one over on .

BTW.
a pet peeve of mine. Sometimes the SIMPLE ELEGANCE of something that looks functions professionally is worth more than bloated code and color schemes. its the MENTAL EFFORT if not the keystroke effort that adds the value in that case.

A good coder uses the LEAST amount code possible… the lighter the site the BETTER it functions. but to become a good coder you have to understand the complexities of code ( this is what I assumed was meant by “new at css”; someone who could do it but maybe not in the lightest most graceful way.) but at this point complexity begins to overlap with coding/design skill.

Think of it this way. look at the Apple logo or the Target logo. Both beautiful trademarks, exemplary of what DESIGN and DESIGN OF LOGOS should be like. But they came froma mind that knew how to arrive at such materialistically effective marks. Now imagine Mr. Jobs telling the graphic designer that that logo is only worth $75 because how hard / how long could it have taken him “to draw that apple”

:slight_smile:

I’m curious as to what you mean by this sentence. How exactly does one judge their own skill level unless already an industry professional?

Do you mean the complexity of the design (techniques / time spent to create it), or simply working out a price based on how ‘professional’ the creator ‘thinks’ they might be.

Sorry if this is a dumb question, but as you posted this as advice it might help to clear this up a little, for me, the poster and other readers!

-Chris

dresden_phoenix, there’s more to building a website than code, skill should also encompass the knowledge the person has in regards to the more theoretical applications of design which can’t be made up “on the spot” or recreated using a quick and dirty mechanism. Take for example fields like information architecture, usability, user-experience design, accessibility (et al), all very important, all can critically affect the end user… and all can have serious implications on the potential for profit from the person buying the service, therefore it pays to account for such items in the amount you work out for the cost. Complexity is too subjective for my liking, some of the most complex websites imaginable were created to be exceptionally simplistic (in appearance and code). It’s a paradoxical factor which does tend to drive people off the edge. The potential to earn off the back of the work generated therefore should be accounted for. :slight_smile:

The basic formula… is your TIME and skill ( or how complex is each page and how hard is it to find someone like you to do it in the same time span).

example:
the goal is still 5 pages, text is provided but no art.

  1. if you have to buy ( or have bought) clip art to use the client pages THEN:
    a) if the art is to be use EXCLUSIVELY by the client THEN tack the COST OF THE ART + 10-20% finders fee ( after all you did spend time looking for it; it would be bad to charge your same3 designer/coder rate as it doesnt take a coder… or designer to search through Comstock)
    b) if the art is NOT for exclusive use. charge a percentage of the cost of the art 20-30% is a good guideline.

  2. How complex is the design… generally. If you are talking custom buttons a myriad of floats , AP, complex drop down menus, exquisite typography. etc or is it a head with 3 columns , each a solid color ?

  1. how fast was it done. Ok, so maybe it wasn’t a complex site, but did you turn it around in 2 days? was it a complex site AND you turned it around in two days?!?!

Factor these and as YOU value YOUR time and you should come up with a fair price.

thats the same as asking… hey how much does a car cost in euros?

In my opinion, there’s two good ways to approach it (other than what sandeephegde mentioned with hourly billing). Those are:

Produce a price based not only on the number of pages but a total breakdown of the cost to produce each feature of the pages (so an itemized list of what you offer).
Go with a fixed price (what you feel the project is worth to you) - this works for huge projects or where you simply want to work with them (beyond the money).

I recommend the following rate calculator: http://freelanceswitch.com/rates/

It depends upon what services you include but around €40.00 per page wouldn’t be a ridiculous figure and it probably would lower in price after 5-pages if they are very similar as basically you are just editing the same design.

I also agree calculate roughly what time it took you and work that into the equation. Really, you should have given the a quote or estimate before starting.

Eventhough I´m a beginner with css?

Btw, thanx for the answer! It is a good advice. =o)
The hard part is, that it´s quite difficult to get answers what the prices are (in my country), since most often the client sends a price offer.

I know I should have given the price and what it includes before starting the webpage making, in my situation I thought I would not matter since the client is a family member… Never doing that mistake again, with both issues… :stuck_out_tongue:

I just code the webpage in css and html. The webpage have different outlooks depending on the pages (one page is centered, one has two rows (in one div, not main-sidebar-divs), etc). But basicly it´s quite a easy one for a pro.

Charge him on the following factors:

  • Time Spent
  • Creativity
  • Support

Your price should be competitive with market price.