Multiple installations of Wordpress

Why, you may ask, would anyone want to have multiple installations of Wordpress on the same website and even in the same database? My family asks me questions like that all the time - just usually not about websites.

I have directions that tell me it is simple, but I have used Filezilla exactly once and I got the files in the wrong directory. I had directions on how to use Filezilla, but not the part about choosing the directory and how to do that.

I think that I have to put each installation into /public.html/ if I am going to have the pages visible to the public. I know that if I choose a unique table name for each installation, I can use the same database, and I have a MySQL database set up thru cPanel. I know where the unique table name goes in the config.php file and even how to format it.

But my directions fail me about where I put the files exactly. I am supposed to decide where I want to put them, and I don’t know how to choose (or how to do it after I choose). I figure that I am going to have multiple copies of the same files that will actually pertain to different pages of my site, so I don’t think they should be all over the place just anywhere in public.html. I am thinking that I would have each installation in its own folder or subfolder, so I can tell them apart when I go to edit them. Some of the editing will be thru cPanel, I expect.

I would guess that each one would look really nice in folders that match their table names, but I don’t know how that would impact whether or not they actually work properly. Can you help me?

Jeannie

PS Someday I will be an absolute wiz at this, just not yet. Thanks for your patient help.

Well, as an example…

Let us suppose that you have a domain called “www.yoursite.com”. Your public_html folder in Filezilla (ftp) is where you can actually begin to see the elements of your site. Therefore, installing Wordpress in a directory within public_html - for example, public_html/wordpress - will lead to the your wordpress install being located at www.yoursite.com/wordpress/

Does that make any sense?

If you simply install wordpress into the public_html folder, then any time you visit www.yoursite.com you will be brought to that first install of wordpress. Any additional install would have to be placed in a new folder within public_html.

If I understand you correctly, I should go into the cPanel of my website and create folders with names like Wordpress01 and Wordpress02 in the public/html directory. Then I would use Filezilla to transfer the first installation into Wordpress01 and the second into Wordpress02. Is that correct?

I have an index page where I will have navigation to the blogs. So I would set them to navigate to mywebsite.com/Wordpress01/ for the first one and mywebsite.com/Wordpress02/for the second one.

My guess is that these page directions will be directly visible to the viewers (once they go to one of the pages), so that if they are up on things they could go back to the pages directly by going to www.mywebsite.com/Wordpress01/. Is that correct? And is there any problem with leaving that so open to viewers? At this point I am not trying to sell anything, so I have nothing to hide except the login id’s and passwords I guess. Is my understanding correct?

Thanks for your help.

Jeannie

That would be correct, yes. The index page should be uploaded to the public_html/ folder. When you point your browser at www.yoursite.com it automatically assumes that index file is the first file you see. If that index file has links to Blog 1 (which would link to www.yoursite.com/wordpress1/) and Blog 2 (which would link to www.yoursite.com/wordpress2/) then you should be all set.

Thank you for everything. The installations are going really well. I just had one minor glich and that is that apparantly Wordpress is sticky about that capital W, so I have to be careful to put that into the address properly.

I hardly got any sleep last night - I was having a ball doing the installations - except when I would fall asleep while Filezilla was uploading the files. I like the little message I get from the remote source if I don’t catch that the upload has ended soon enough. It tells me it has disconnected and that next time I should try typing a little faster…

Jeannie

Ah, yes, I was going to mention that, I suppose I forgot. It is generally taboo to have capital letters in your directories. But other than that, congratulations and good luck.