Learn CSS, it's good for you

I don’t know if this is the best place for this or not but, seriously, learn css.

My team is looking for another front end dude (or dudette) and the repeating theme seems to be:
Oh I know all the new stuff, I know JS, I know React, Redux, whatever else is the new shiny… But when it comes to " how would you lay this out", well that’s when things seem to fall apart.

Myself and 2 other front-enders were like old men, "back in OUR day, to call yourself a front-end developer, you had to know CSS.

There has been a lot of talk about a split in front end thinking when it comes to what a “true” front end person knows. Weather its someone who knows how to develop in Javascript, or weather its someone who knows Semantic Markup, CSS, RWD, etc. Frankly I think its all, otherwise I need to be paid for 2 jobs.

But seriously, learn css. I hate gong thru code and seeing bad stuff and knowing I have no time to refactor, it hurts.

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I think the problem is that front-end has advanced and evolved so much during the last 10 years that the front-end developer is now a jack of all trades and a master of none, instead of someone who ‘specialises’ in front-end.

Also probably the fact that someone who can write some CSS and some JavaScript with the latest framework can easily call themselves a CSS and a JavaScript developer when in reality they do not know much about the underlying technologies.
I think just as the digital camera blurred the professional boundary in the photography industry due to the ease in which shots could be taken and edited in Photoshop, frameworks have done a bit of the same for the front-end web development industry.

5 Likes

I agree on the CSS bit. The js… well depends on the framework. I speak only of my current stack and say its actually improved my js skills a bit, but it’s all in vanilla js. CSS frameworks make me madder than they probably should.