Learn Angular with Sublime Text 3 on a Mac?


#1

Hello,

I am struggling to learn Angular with Sublime Text on my Macbook Pro (using terminal).
Can anyone suggest any courses I can take to learn Angular?

I know the basics (HTML/CSS/Javascript). Yes, I've installed the necessary backend technologies, I'm just moving from changing things with HTML files on my desktop to "magically" creating files with the terminal and then having NO IDEA on how to access them with my editor so I can make edits.

I've just heard so much about Angular(latest version please!), wanted to at least know how to build something with it.


#2

This is the wrong approach IMO. I would suggest that you spend some time cementing your knowledge of vanilla JS and then opt for the framework that best addresses the problem you are trying to solve.

In this vein, there is a great Black Friday sale going on right now: Wes Bos's ES6 for Everyone, which has been updated to include ES7, ES8 and Async + Await Flow Control. You can find it here: https://es6.io . Also, if you want further discount, join SittePoint Premium & grab an additional 25%!

Saying all of this, if you absolutely, definitely must use Angular, we have a pretty great tutorial series here on SitePoint:


#3

As @Pullo mention, try several frameworks before deciding on one. A couple of weeks ago I did this for one of my projects with Vue, Polymer, React, and Angular. Eventually, Angular took last place in that comparison.


#4

This is the wrong approach IMO. I would suggest that you spend some time cementing your knowledge of vanilla JS and then opt for the framework that best addresses the problem you are trying to solve.

I was more interested in learning it ASAP so I can inform an interviewer I have "some" experience with Angular. Secondly, google endorses it, so is it really that bad?


#5

A couple of weeks ago I did this for one of my projects with Vue, Polymer, React, and Angular. Eventually, Angular took last place in that comparison.

Just curios, which came in 1st , 2nd and 3rd place for that project and do you have a codepen or js.fiddle of that project anywhere online by chance?


#6

Popular opinion on the internet has shifted towards React. None of of them are bad. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. I will be starting a job in the next couple of days working exclusively with Angular as a senior front-end developer after having ten years of full stack experience in PHP. The industry is moving fast in the JavaScript progressive web app direction and those jobs pay well. So as long as you get on the boat using one or some of these frameworks your future should be secured for the for-seeable future. In terms of IDEs I love PHPStorm and WebStorm is just as great for the JavaScript stuff.

One google you can search "angular vs. react" and find a ton of recent, unbias articles. At the end of the day though you will likely just end up working with the one which the company you begin working for uses. Every company is going to be different. Unless you're an architect or in a leadership role you won't likely have a say in the framework anyway.


#7

Meh! Learn JavaScript first. You say you know the basics, so in my opinion it is way too early to start looking at frameworks. If you invest a load of time in learning a framework, but don't understand the fundamentals of the underlying language, you could find yourself in trouble (employability-wise) if that framework falls out of favour. Also, the minute you need to do something in a slightly different way than is prescribed by the framework, you'll be stuck.

It's not bad, but it's designed to solve a certain problem. For example, it's great if you are part of a large team writing model-view type applications, which need to support native UI rendering for iOS and Android. However for smaller projects with one or two devs, it could easily be considered overkill.


#8

I don't agree with that statement. Angular has a steep learning curve but contains everything you need to build a modern web application. React on the other hand is just a view layer where the developer has to fill in all the other architectural gaps. There are advantages and disadvantages to that but having worked on large CMS platforms like Magento and Drupal I prefer the robust, structural nature of Angular over the loose react ecosystem. Luckily I found a job with Angular because I could have easily ended up using React as well. One thing does hold true though and that is it is going to be very tough to find a job in modern front-end development without basic/intermediate native JavaScript knowledge. In my job search I took several tests and most of those tests had a native JavaScript part to them. Spending some time with a modern JavaScript book might not be a bad idea before diving into some of these frameworks. I have found Angular to be a steep learning curve even though I've been using JavaScript for nearly a decade. The complexity and power of Angular reminds me a lot of Drupal. Which is funny because the Drupal folks have decided to begin prototyping parts of the admin with react but thats another topic.


#9

Fair enough. What part of that don't you agree with? Just to clarify, I'm not knocking Angular (far from it), but it can be overkill for smaller projects.

Exactly :slight_smile:


#10

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