How to learn javascript quickly

How to learn javascript quickly

I would suggest learning it properly rather than quickly.

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https://www.codementor.io/learn-javascript-online

Why the haste? :wonky:

Are you terminally ill? :scream:

coothead

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Step 1 - Check out this recent SP article, How to Learn Programming Languages Faster :wink:

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You have a lot of options:

I don’t understand the idea of learning it "quickly. But I do think there are different kinds of people with different needs.

For example, if you’ve never done programming before in your life, you are a certain kind of learner who needs certain kinds of teachers.

If you are a senior level Java or C/C++ programmer, you can probably skip a lot of general programming principles and language construct explanations and just get the nitty gritty of the new language.

If you are computer nerd versus a non-techy person.

If you are a young person versus older adult.

If you like reading and exercises versus watching videos and live coding.

If you need hand holding or just a list of easily-searchable references.

If you don’t want to fool around with little online 2 hour courses here and there and go strait to a larger coding school program, you can find those. If you want to study an entire full stack web programming tract you can find those.
If you’re on a budget and just want to get all the best free stuff, plenty of good free stuff!

This must be the most quickest learning method :slight_smile:

https://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/javascript/

And take a look at some of the other languages available if you have a couple more minutes to spare.

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Please allow me a joke. A la The Matrix style…

If you really want to learn JavaScript I suggest going vanilla straight into the nitty gritty. Presumably there is no really fast way unless Matrix tech gets here soon

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I like that article by @jsonmez IMHO it is very sound advice.

I think a lot depends on what one means by “learn”.
To me, there are various stages.

  • Familiarity - a rough idea of what tools are in the toolbox but not knowing what each and every one does or how they’re used
  • Literate - enough understanding that code can be read and what code is doing can be recognized even if not fully understood
  • Competent - ability to use and write code so that things “work” even if not best practice
  • Proficient - the more frequently used “basics” no longer require any thought, they come “naturally” and only the more rare / more difficult code needs effort
  • Expert - everything about everything is known and code is always the best it can possibly be

If the “expert” sounds a bit sarcastic, it’s because it was by intent. It is near impossible to even attain that level let alone maintain that level. It is the proverbial carrot always just beyond ones grasp.

As the article points out, learning by doing is critical. And not just once, but by practice, practice, practice. So a lot also depends on what one considers “quickly” to mean. The earlier levels could be relatively “quick”, but “expert” (and arguably even “proficient”) will be a life-long commitment.

 
 
 
        Of course, if the truth were known, the O.P. has/had
        no intention, whatsoever, in learning “JavaScript”. :wonky:

        If he/she has/had then he/she would not have asked
        the inane question in the first place as he/she would
        have been too busy with his/her studies. :rolleyes:

        Of course, members here seem to get a certain amount
        of satisfaction, including moi, from making learned or
        sarcastic replies to these nonsensical hypothetical
        questions. :biggrin:

        coothead
        
        
        

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I personally wouldn’t try to learn all the ins and outs of the language before actually doing anything.
I would pick something specific you want to use javascript for and then find out how javascript can make that work for you.

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