Graphic Recreation / Degree of Separation

How much does an image have to be changed from an original to be considered something new? Say for example you find an image online, but it’s not for sale–it’s a common pumpkin shape with a carving of a light bulb. It just so happens that it works perfectly as your logo. You need a pumpkin with a light bulb carved in it and that’s all there is. The image is perfect but it’s just absolutely not for sale.

How much does that image have to change for it to become yours. Also, this image wouldn’t be hard at all for a graphic designer to reproduce or manipulate.

Thanks -

Amazing what you can find on the web.

Here’s a Virtual Pumpkin Carving site:

Not necessarily what you’re looking for or asking about, of course, but it’s a fun novelty!

I would say if you want a logo of a pumpkin with a light bulb shaped cutout, then just ask a designer to create an original one for you, with the emphasis on original. It’s a very generic idea. After all, it must have been done a thousand times over the years. No need for too much soul-searching. :pumpkin:

Paul

Any changes you make to someone else’s work make yours a derivitive of theirs and they continue to own the copyright on the work. Basically no matter how much you change someone else’s image it never becomes yours if the original you started from was theirs.

What you have to do is to start from scratch or from images in the public domain so that the only person with any claim on the final image is you.

^Thanks

I guess my first post wasn’t as clear as it should have been, but it’s hard to explain. I always meant designing from scratch… never touching their graphic. Yea come to think of it, I don’t think I know how to explain this :wink:

LOL! Thanks Paul, it’s not that actually… just using those as an example. A very lame one hhaa ha.

Can’t get a hold of the authors, though apparently they are in business. Funny people say the economy is in bad shape, seems I have to beg people walking on hot coals to do simple freelance projects or buy direct. I’m about to start paying even for email replies…

Ah, yes, brain malfunction! I didn’t notice you were just giving the pumpkin/lightbulb idea as an example! Sorry about that. :jack1:

Paul

Any changes you make to someone else’s work make yours a derivitive of theirs and they continue to own the copyright on the work. Basically no matter how much you change someone else’s image it never becomes yours if the original you started from was theirs.

What you have to do is to start from scratch or from images in the public domain so that the only person with any claim on the final image is you.

Didn’t mean to enter those keywords there I guess.

One certainly can have an ‘idea’ (one that is quite simple in nature yet complex in context) and then find it online … by someone who has a particular skill that you lack. So they can draw it but I still had the idea too, not everything is black & white.

I’m trying to respect the original authors work by asking this question. Art inspires and people emulate, that’s not a new concept.

Your reason for editing your post is ironic. Anything “changed” is still the intellectual property of its creator. If you want an original jack-o-lantern with a light bulb stuck inside it for your logo, the only thing that makes it original is if you draw it for yourself… and even so, the ‘idea’ wasn’t yours if you found it somewhere else.