Google's new programming language

Anyone tried GO yet? URL is golang dot org (sorry, I can’t post url’s yet)
Google’s new C++ replacement language. Very interesting. It’s main goals are to eliminate long compile times, take better advantage of multi-core processing in the compiler and core language libraries, and simplify syntax with a language that’s designed for multi-core operation from the ground up.

Demos show the core language libraries being compiled on a standard mac book in under 10 seconds. A lot of the omitted syntax also just seems to make sense and reduce potential hard to find typos.

Go Google…

Is this a genuine question? It reads like advertising. As far as I’ve noticed, there was a brief amount of hype over GO, then pretty much nothing.

Aside from their indexing and search algorithms, Google hasn’t produced anything that I rate very highly.

Cheers,
D.

As far as I can see, this has absolutely nothing to do with Google in any shape or form.
It looks more like you have put together a framework/ language and are looking to distribute it on the back of google by using the google colors on your pages…

Am I right?

What did you expect?

GoLang is their internal development that might be used for some internal Google tools. Now, they decided to release it to public, so that community could extend it by writing libraries.

As for the hype about it, I guess, everyone was pretty surprised by the fact Google released a programming language, <irony>but then people realised that it was too difficult for them, because they knew only how to create crappy web apps.</irony>

What got my attention was one of the authors (Ken Thompson), not “Google”.

Yeah, it’s a genuine question. Perhaps it read like advertising because I was simply reporting on what I’d observed so far in Googles video I watched on the GO language and I was intrigued by it.

You are 100% wrong and I’m kind of chuckling at the accusation. How did I come off so “promotional”?

So no, I’m discussing a Google branded product and was just interested in seeing if any genius coders on the sitepoint forums had tried it, and whether anyone had USEFUL thoughts to share instead of really lame unfounded accusations. What am I, Troll-bait?

http://google-opensource.blogspot.com/2009/11/hey-ho-lets-go.html

Cool, I hadn’t noticed but that’s definitely someone you’d want on board if when trying to re-invent C++ (and others) for multi-core systems.

Yet another programming language? OOw dear! We don’t need it.

We have enough code syntex-induced headache. There is hardly anything to benefit from a new programming language. Someone or some company is making name and potentially money for themselves. It won’t change the IT landscape as we know it.


Yet another programming language? OOw dear! We don’t need it.

I know what you mean, but it’s been a long time since there’s been a new platform language. We certainly don’t need another new web scripting language though.

A platform language that offers unheard of extremely low compile times on ordinary machines and takes advantage of multi-core architecture without the need for fancy parallel processing libraries and without having to specifically design your application to take advantage of said libraries and handle all the threading yourself? Hmmm, I’d say Go offers enough to make a go of it.

I think there’s a lot of people and companies that will find it a useful tool.

I read this like a year ago, but I remember it because of the catchy title: http://www.gotw.ca/publications/concurrency-ddj.htm

I haven’t looked close enough at Go, does it change anything in this man’s statements? Or am I misreading

takes advantage of multi-core architecture without the need for fancy parallel processing libraries and without having to specifically design your application to take advantage of said libraries and handle all the threading yourself?

?

(question is anyone comparing it with Erlang?)

Me, I don’t see anything wrong with a new and improved C, it’s just that there really are already plenty of options, though most of them are specific to certain areas (compiled bio-Perl for genetics study, APL for aeronautics, etc). Still, I figure if Ken Thompson thought he could make it better and that it would be worthwhile, it’s gotta be worth checking out.