Free Internet Security Suite? Review and Compare

I’d been searching for few days, but came out with just one: Comodo Internet Security, from comparison chart of http://www.matousec.com/projects/proactive-security-challenge/results.php

But then i read elsewhere with negative comments of Comodo Internet Security(probably free version)

Of coz I have no problem paying for a good one, just looking if anyone of you have ever use one of those bundle suite, anti-virus+firewall.

After all, now using Agnitum Outpost Security Suite Pro Trial version, will be expired in few days.

If i can find one good free to use, then why not?

Agree I’ve tested some of their software and were really good.

I use Webroot Spy Sweeper Anti virus. It works perfect. It catches everything before it tries to get in and tells me something tried to get it and it quarantined it.

Comodo Internet Security Suite is a very good software for home security. It includes an award winning firewall and a good anti virus scanner. You can also try Avast! Internet Security which is fast and consumes low system resources.

Other free security suites are:
SecureIT Free and ESA Internet Security 2010

I think MSE is one of the best free anti virus out there. Much better than AVG in my book.

Of the free one’s the Kaspersky Internet Security and the Avast Security are the two of the best in business in terms of killing viruses and worms.

There’s nothing wrong with Comodo, their a highly respected security firm. Whomever you go with you’ll find some people don’t like that particular solution - I think the case in point is as long as you avoid Norton (excluding enterprise editions) and Mcaffee (all versions), you’ll be fine. :slight_smile:

Doh! We use Norton in the office here and I set up McAfee in my parent’s office.

Now using Comodo, works so far so good. I think I will stick with the free suite

What’s wrong with Microsoft Security Essentials? I don’t know why anyone would pay for A/V anymore.

Well I use Avira which uses the Kaspersky’s engine… which has a much better detection rate than Microsoft’s product, so I know why I pay for antivirus. :slight_smile:

No security suite is best at everything so if you really want the best possible then you’d install individual products for each component.

One problem with some of the security products is with the way that they link deep into the operating system where they can totally stuff things up if your particular setup differs slightly from the variants they tested on. The last security suite I paid for I ended up demanding a refund because with everything enabled it added over half an hour to the time taken to boot the computer and if you tried to do anything with the computer too soon it started destroying files. The free security products are less likely to try to provide security at that level and hence don’t protect against attacks at that level and also can actually run on more systems.

Much better? We’re talking a few percent differences at best. I would ask myself, what am I downloading and installing that makes these few extra percent worthwhile? The system is only as strong as the end user using it. Realistically, if you use your brain, and use MSE, there is no reason to pay extra because those extra percent that you claim are there, would be offset by the stupidity of the end user.

Personally I don’t use A/V because if you half a brain you won’t get infected in the first place. But if you insist on using something, don’t waste money, just use MSE.

Some of the top security experts do not run certain security software at all as they claim it just gives a false sense of security. For example with firewalls, how many people actually know enough about what programs actually need external access to know when to click NO when asked by the firewall whether or not to allow a program that access. If the person is always going to click on YES when the software asks then it serves no purpose being there.

Otehr security software such as anti-virus does serve a purpose for at least some people as not everyone is bright enough to be able to tell what is and isn’t a virus so as to avoid running them. Just because I haven’t yet seen an AV program detect a virus that wasn’t obvious enough for me to delete it in the first place doesn’t mean that there might not be an occassion in the future when someone manages to send me one that I would have missed. At least then there’s a chance that the AV program might still recognise it.

McAfee Internet Security 2010. Comes with 3 licenses, so it is a good deal.

Surely for any free security suite (which is what this thread is discussing) you can use it on as many computers as you like - so a free program you can only use on three computers doesn’t sound like a good deal at all.

Not any of the security suites will be able to fulfill your need.

Reason is that they can’t be perfect in all aspect. So if some suite is good in av check, then some would be better in firewalling or spyware check. then some would be better in some other thing.

So better would be to use individual product, which you like.

While I use, zone alarm’s firewall, but that doesn’t give me to control over the program as I want to, it doesn’t have option to allow port or open a port and other option as it used to be.

I use 2 antivirus program Avira and MSSE. I must say MS SE is very lightweight. and two antispyware program too… Super antispyware and ad-aware. Well I’ve never scanned my system with ad-aware yet from the past 3 years. Only I’m updating that… lolz :smiley:

So the first of them to run should delete the other as being a virus and if it doesn’t then one or other of them isn’t doing a very good job of detecting viruses.

You should only ever run one antivurus and one firewall. You can run multiples of the other security components.

I am using avast… its great. Mcafee’s new version is also good

McAfee has (if it’s even possible) a worse record than Norton for antiviral protection.

While I agree with your general ethos that if your smart about what you download, you don’t really need to be that worried I think over recent years the situation has somewhat changed. Before in the days of Trojans and viruses we simply had to be careful of what we physically downloaded (which let’s face it, anyone with half a brain could avoid) however with the state of the Internet, depending on your browsing habits (even if they are relatively safe) you could quite easily stumble upon something which purges stuff on your machine of a malicious nature. I remember when mySpace had that issue with some dirty advertising a while back that infected around 400k machines with a gnarly little worm. Of course if you have everything (including scripting) turned off until you trust the site and only browse a strict set of sites, you’ll probably be fine - though a risk still exists if sites allow 3rd party embedding… but I need scripting and all the “goodies” for my job so unfortunately I prefer to have something to catch when something nasty tries to dive into my machine due to an unsuspecting client wondering why his site causes problems. :slight_smile:

That’s rather silly, it’s a well established fact having two firewalls or AV guards will result in them attacking each other or giving each other express permissions which thereby lower your inherent security (as bad products just need to seek an exploit in one of the apps to do their damage). :slight_smile: