Custom fonts on the web. Other than Typekit?

Hello,

Hope everyone is well.

I am currently working on re-branding a company. Along with that comes the web redesign. We are hoping to define a use a new company “font” aka some font that we think is nice, that will from now on be used on all things company.

How hard it is to have a custom font on the web? Can I embed? How effective is that?

Has anyone ever used http://typekit.com/ ? What is your experience with this site?

Thanks in advance.
n

Keeping things simple: You can embed custom fonts on a website fairly easily if you know your CSS, and it’ll work cross browser (though You’ll need various font formats). One thing to be wary of is that unless the font you want allows it to be used on the web (such as through services like Typekit), it’s a criminal offence to make available font’s (custom or otherwise) on the web without the author or foundries permission. Basically it’s a matter of copyright and putting commercial fonts online is a real issue. There’s a lot of services like Typekit out there (if you look hard enough) and their worth the money if you want a simple, clean solution that requires little to no work on your end, it’s probably the best method that exists for legal web based alternative fonts. :slight_smile:

Interesting. Silly lil’ me didn’t even think of legal issues regarding the fonts :blush: That said however, I think the font I may want to use IS on TypeKit and perhaps its allowed for me to use in CSS, provided the client buys the license.

As far as TypeKit goes, I’m hearing mixed reviews on whether or not its stable, and worth the monthly payment.

Have you had a chance to use it? Did you find it to have reasonable loading times, and rendering?

I found from using it as a trial that the rendering of certain type-faces is a bit unstable. In some cases different some fonts display alternating weights on lettering in sentences and even words. But I am unsure if maybe this is only an issue known to trial/free accounts.

I guess I am trying to figure out is if its worth trying to sell it to my client, but I guess only I can figure it out :wink:

Thanks for the quick response.

Well it is early days in respect to custom fonts on the web, I think it does a fair job considering but it’s only been around a short period of time. The custom font industry has yet to really take off on the web (I tend to stick to the usual boring typefaces as I don’t trust the services entirely - I’m not one for depending on 3rd party services). In regards to the legal issues, most font makers and foundries are still uncomfortable with the idea of their fonts being on the web, so until there’s a unified agreement, it’s simply a case of these services or nothing because alas, I’ve yet to hear of a font maker of foundry giving the rights to use the font on the web, their too scared that their typefaces will end up being pirated and no-one will buy fonts anymore, so as it currently stands without express written permission it’s still illegal (cept in the cases of Typekit where they already have set agreements in place with publishers). :slight_smile:

Thats pretty much what I thought as well. But I like DAX so much for the project that I’m working on! sigh :slight_smile: Thanks again.

@font-face Generator
http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator

As good as the tool is… it doesn’t get round the copyright issue. I’ve yet to see a major foundry or well known typeface maker allow their font for web usage. The only ones you can use are those ugly malformed typefaces on free sites (that have their own issues - like not supporting a full range of characters which can be troublesome on international translations) or the 50 or less font’s given the FGPL (for fonts) license - I think it’s called FGPL anyway. If you use that tool on ANY font you don’t have the authors permission on (for web distribution), you’re committing copyright theft (in broad daylight)… bad idea. :slight_smile: