Results of your Marketing Survey are here!

http://www.sitepoint.com/examples/downtobusiness/SmallBusinessSurvey06.pdf

The above URL will let you download the Sitepoint Small Business Survey of 2006. Thanks to Sitepoint again for setting this up with me. Let me know your interpretation of the results, and here are some of my observations:

1. The survey respondents are 86% men. Let’s get more women into this field!

2. Respondents are all over the map in terms of years in business. But 61% have been in business for 3 years or more. Despite this experience, 49% are generating less than $50,000 in revenue and 71% are generating less than $100,000. There is lots of opportunity to increase revenues for those who want to! Note that 17% of respondents say that their firm generates over $200,000 in revenue. Why not you?

3. About half of respondents put in 5 hours or less per month for marketing. That may help explain why about half of respondents are earning less than $50,000. YOU HAVE TO MAKE MARKETING A PRIORITY IF YOU WANT TO EARN BIG DOLLARS.

4. Related to the above responses, about 35% of you are somewhat or very comfortable with marketing and sales. That means the majority of you have an opportunity to keep learning about marketing by reading (via Sitepoint’s kit, my program, or other marketing books) and doing (by testing and talking to others about effective techniques). Marketing is not hard, but it does need to be a priority and you have to keep at it.

5. The majority of you do not use the following tactics: advertising, direct marketing, public speaking, publicity/press releases, writing articles (really 45%, but close to a majority), Pay Per Click Advertising, telemarketing, and newsletters (mailed or electronic). It is not clear why although I suspect either: you have had bad results with these and so no longer want to use them; or you are not putting enough effort into marketing. Public speaking, publicity, and writing articles are definitely proven marketing strategies. (In the survey, see that those who use these tactics rate them highly). They are great ways to educate your audience about what you do, and build your credibility as an expert. Newsletters, while rated less favorably in the survey, are a great way to stay in touch with prospects over time. The others cost money and get questionable results for many — but also get good results for some. Perhaps they can work for you if executed properly.

6. Not surprisingly, referrals and networking are rated the highest in terms of effectiveness. 87% of respondents rate referrals as somewhat or very effective, with 73% rating this tactic as very effective. 62% of you get more than half of your clients from referrals from current or past clients, and 53% of you get over half of your clients from referrals in your overall network. At the same time, my experience with my clients is that many of you have a great opportunity to do EVEN BETTER in this area. Most people do not proactively ask for referrals — for instance, by sitting down with the client, jogging their memory with specific questions, and working with them to develop the best way to introduce you to a prospect. Similarly, networking (which 79% of you said was somewhat or very effective) is a proactive, systematic tactic; many people are not tenacious enough in getting visible and building up their “sphere of influence.”

7. Only 9% of you spend 50% or more of your marketing budget and time focusing on a specific industry or industries. So very few of you are taking my advice that you focus in on a specific target market. Again: You will get more clients with less time and money if you narrow your target market.

8. Almost half of you (45%) find it somewhat or very difficult to get the word out about your firm so that your target market is aware of you, and about the same percentage have trouble generating leads. See #5 and #3, above, and start doing more marketing.

9. As expected, once you get a lead, most of you are much more comfortable converting that lead to a client and then to a repeat client. For those who are not, start reading sales books — especially Sandler (You Can’t Teach a Kid to Ride a Bike at a Seminar) and Rackham (SPIN Selling).

10. You noted some excellent tactics that should have been included in the survey: Internet directories, the tactics described in Guerilla Marketing, “site created by..” listings at bottom of websites (including developing free sites with your listing), direct emails, cold calling, myspace.com profile, providing a knowledge base on your niche, giveaways and displays, Sitepoint’s marketplace, Blogging, alliances with software vendors and colleagues, affiliate programs, and forum participation.

What else do you notice?

Thanks again for responding!

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  • http://www.themesforge.com ct_roy

    46% are either Very Uncomfortable or Somewhat comfortable with their overall marketing and sales.

    Think i might join you Andrew in your area of expertise :)

  • http://www.actra.no/ Pacifer

    The source of our current sales pipeline leads look like this:

    Network 50%
    Referrals 25%
    Cold calling 8%
    Online 8%

  • http://www.themesforge.com ct_roy

    also, the power of print advertising seems to be overlooked

    62% don’t use ANY print advertising (excluding phonebook)

    Local newspapers and industry magazines are gold mines if used correctly.

    is there a typo on page 3?

    “How effective is phone book advertising (other than the phone book) in
    helping you to attract clients?”

  • http://www.themesforge.com ct_roy

    for all the attention Pay per Click advertising gets, almost 62% don’t use it at all for attracting clients – seems very high!

    another typo on page 8

    “How often do you use Search Engine Optimization on yoru web site to
    attract clients?”

    and i love this from page 10
    “We are getting to be known as the company that can solve everything for
    a client. Sometimes it can be some very stupid work, but that brings them
    back to us: we are always there for them. Value your customers! Also,
    when we get into contact with a potential customer, we spend lots of time
    with them, and show them that they’re valued from the beginning. It
    doesn’t matter if their job is small or big. Doing a small job now might bring
    in the huge contract next year.”

    true. true.

    Very insightful survey Andrew. Well done.

  • http://www.designity.nl peach

    But 61% have been in business for 3 years or more. Despite this experience, 49% are generating less than $50,000 in revenue and 71% are generating less than $100,000. There is lots of opportunity to increase revenues for those who want to! Note that 17% of respondents say that their firm generates over $200,000 in revenue. Why not you?

    Mind that lots of sitepointers are teenagers and not working fulltime.

  • drakke

    It seems from that survey that most businesses don’t do any marketing.

    In that case I think that survey could apply to almost any small/medium-sized business (not just designers) in how much marketing they do.

  • http://www.assemblysys.com mniessen

    Regarding the revenue… Don’t forget that many Sitepointers are living in places where salaries and cost of living are different than in the US (or other developped countries). What really counts is the purchasing power, not what you earn (see the Big Mac index)!

  • aneitlich

    All of these are good points. But a question:

    Who has benchmarked their own marketing to others in the survey and sees an opportunity to improve? What opportunity do you recognize and what will you do about it?

    Andrew

  • Stevie D

    “How effective is phone book advertising (other than the phone book) in helping you to attract clients?”

    The way I would interpret that is that (i) your business is listed in the phone book, in tiny print, just like everyone else, or (ii) you take out an advert in the phone book, which stands out above other entries.

  • basia

    My opinion about phone books is to get minimal insertion, nothing more. It saves time and nerves to reject various sellers or… charity foundraisers. (We have not enough money to save the world, we have to save ourselves first… Life…)
    However, listing in printed directory for target market, it is (at least here, in Poland) cheaper and more effective.
    What to improve? Obviously a lot, and again back to it. (To be done… soon… in nearest future… of course soonest…)

  • http://www.kisanbhat.com Kisan

    The majority of you do not use the following tactics: advertising, direct marketing, public speaking, publicity/press releases, writing articles (really 45%, but close to a majority), Pay Per Click Advertising, telemarketing, and newsletters (mailed or electronic).

    I wish the survey had a field asking for the size of the company, freelance, consultants etc.

    A small/big company may have resources to handle such kind of marketing tactics. A freelancer like me has no time or resources and will depend mainly on word of mouth and Search Engine rankings
    for marketing the services.

    Kisan

  • aneitlich

    Kisan,

    Not true. Not true at all. There are many inexpensive ways to use those tactics. Speaking, writing, publicity, and enewsletters are virtually free.

    Andrew

  • http://www.domedia.org/ junjun

    Any other demographics on the respondends? Age, geography, kind of business entity etc?

  • buziboy

    The report is helpful, but they would be moreso if they were broken down by $ category. Then we could really see the cost-benefit of the various marketing approaches vs. the revenue earned by the business in general.
    In other words, I know the various forms of marketing are helpful, but which ones can help us get from the “under $50K” category to the “over $50K” category?
    For future use, I’d also be great if responders could provide us with a % of their income spent on marketing activities. Even if they only generalized, knowing how much spending it might take to make a difference would be helpful.
    I sure do appreciate the survey & report, though. I haven’t found anything like it in years.