In Part 1 of this series I introduced the basics of using Git – creating repositories, adding files, committing files, and using the Git’s log and diff tools to view a timeline of your changes. This part will move on from that to cover some slightly more advanced topics: reverting changes, creating branches, and merging changes from one branch into another. Reverting Changes after You’ve Screwed Up Let’s take a classic example involving some unintentionally deleted work. You’ve edited a source file to make a simple change and you’re are about to hit Ctrl + S (assuming you’re not using vi) to save your work when the palm of your hand brushes across your laptop’s touch pad which causes a large chunk of the file to be selected

Original post:
PHPMaster: Introduction to Git, Part 2

Tags: git
Sean Hudgston is well-balanced fellow who lives and works as a software engineer in Syracuse, NY. Sean has a degree in Computer Science, and when not doing things related to that, he enjoys brewing beer, making coffee, growing hops, cooking, disc golf, mowing his lawn, and playing guitar or bass as the situation may warrant.

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