Can Opera Raise its Market Share?

I’m always hesitant about writing Opera articles. The browser has a passionate and vocal community and you never encounter such heated debate when discussing its competitors.

If I berate a feature, I’ll be told that Opera’s implementation is the best. If I commend Opera, I’ll be informed that I haven’t given it enough praise. In either case, it’s made obvious that I’m too dumb to appreciate the browser.

Opera’s market share is the most controversial issue and a flame war will erupt the moment I mention the magical 2%. The most fanatical users will claim various conspiracies, inaccuracies, and fallacies. So, here goes…

According to most web statistics, the desktop edition of Opera has the lowest market share of the five top browsers. It hovers at around 2% and has barely moved since it was launched over a decade ago.

That’s not to say Opera’s user base isn’t growing. As web usage increases, so does the total number of installations and the company reports 140 million users worldwide (the total for all mobile and desktop editions). However, it’s not experiencing accelerated growth like Chrome. Google’s market share is growing proportionally faster than general internet growth.

In addition, Opera is by far the most widely-installed mobile browser. The mobile editions of IE, Safari and Firefox pale into insignificance because they all require powerful smart phones. Opera Mini and Mobile can be installed on more humble devices and are the default browsers for millions of phones. That said, I expect iPhone 3G users browse the web more often than a typical Opera user.

What’s Opera’s killer feature?

But let’s return to the desktop edition. What is Opera’s killer feature?

IE is a corporate workhorse or novice browser. Chrome is known for speed and stability. Firefox’s reputation was gained from functionality and extensibility for power users. Safari is the obvious choice for those wanting the Apple experience.

Opera is good all-round browser but doesn’t excel in a particular area. It’s difficult to identify the target audience and summarize the browser’s position in the market. There are varied reasons for it’s sedate uptake, but there are few compelling reasons to recommend Opera when alternatives offer an easier, faster or more customizable experience (even if they fall behind in other respects).

If you want speed, use Chrome (or perhaps IE9). If you want functionality, use Firefox with add-ons. Opera may be fast and flexible, but it doesn’t beat the competition. Some users want a browser that’s a jack-of-all-trades, but I’m convinced many more want the best option for whatever interests them.

Opera fans may argue their browser is innovative. I agree — the company has introduced many of the features we now take for granted. However, we’ve reached a point where most of the newer options have niche appeal. Turbo mode and Unite are great ideas but how many people understand or want them?

Opera’s tablet cure

Tablet PCs have been around for many years but the devices have become increasing popular following Apple’s success with the iPad. Clones will flood the market during the next 12 months offering a variety of features, form factors and OSs. They’re likely to overtake netbooks and may threaten the laptop and smart phone markets.

Opera has an incredible opportunity to produce the definitive browser for tablet PCs:

  • it’s available on most platforms including Windows, OS X, Linux, Symbian and iOS
  • it has built-in email, chat, note-taking and widgets
  • it’s fast and Opera 11 offers extensions
  • the browser is already optimized for small-screen devices
  • it has low power, processing and memory requirements
  • mouse gestures could be adapted for touch control

The only stumbling block is that all tablets will offer capable browsers. However, Opera has a good chance of success if they seek licensing deals or can prove their browser is a better option.

Perhaps tablets could be Opera’s savior? If users try Opera on a tablet, it’s less of a psychological leap to install it on their PC.

I’m yet to be convinced that Opera can break above its market share barrier, but tablets could be its route to stardom.

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  • SteveTheOldMan

    I tried Opera a few years ago, and really liked it. Just seemed a few sites I often went to went to weren’t compatible. with it…so much for ‘cross-browser compatibility!’ What do I use on my Windows PC…Safari!

    • zhu

      I think!

  • Jenni

    ‘you never encounter such heated debate when discussing its competitors’

    Seriously? There’s this thing called Internet Explorer you know…
    I believe browser discussion always generates heated debate, no matter which is being discussed.

    I have Opera on my Android phone, and it’s better than all the competitors I’ve tried, although tabbed browsing would be an improvement. It’s lightweight, fast and the bookmark home screen is genius.

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      IE rarely causes any debate. Few developers like it and, those that do, accept it isn’t perfect. By comparison, Opera’s users are incredibly passionate — as you’ll see below…

      • WinkyWolla

        The reason why you are getting these responses from Opera users and not IE users is that you are constantly denigrating Opera, while other browsers are not being treated the same way.

        You are clearly biased against Opera. Just look at how you claim that “Chrome excels at performance, Opera at nothing.”

        You have, in fact, failed to address any criticism or answer any questions:

        1. Would users of other browsers accept it if you kept repeating false claims about their particular browser of choice?
        2. How is someone who points out inaccuracies and fallacies “fanatical”?
        3. What conspiracies are you referring to?

        And claiming that IE9 is faster than Opera? Come on… How transparent can you get?

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        I think it’s obvious that you haven’t read what I’ve written about Opera. I’ve always stated that I have it installed, use it, like it, and it deserves a larger market share (that was the whole point of this article).

        It’s great that you passionately support the browser. However, part of the problem is a small vocal sector of Opera community who become defensive even when there’s nothing to defend.

      • WinkyWolla

        I don’t passionately support Opera. I passionately oppose misinformation. I’m not being defensive. I’m calling you out on specific claims you keep making without a shred of evidence.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        You don’t agree with the 2% market share statistic … despite the ‘shreds’ I’ve given!

        I want Opera’s market share to be higher and have suggested a route they could take. You’re saying it’s already high. Which is the least dangerous opinion?

      • Robbo

        I think the point he is making is that you are claiming chrome and IE9 are faster… I haved used all browsers like you. And nothing compares in any way to the speed of Opera. Low resources usage as well. Just because chrome might be able to render a page 0.00001 seconds faster doesn’t mean the program itself is faster… it isn’t.

      • WinkyWolla

        I have demolished your sources for the 2% claim. If you want to talk about “dangerous”, it is far more dangerous to repeat the lie that “Opera is tiny and irrelevant”, because a 7% global market share is anything but irrelevant. But by repeating the 2% lie and your other talking points, you are basically telling the world, “Opera is tiny and irrelevant.”

        Also, “faster” is about more than page loading (which Opera is actually faster than Chrome at).

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        @Robbo
        That’s great, but everyone will have different experiences (and benchmarks are flawed). I use Windows 7 and Ubuntu – here are my observations:

        For starting speed, Chrome wins followed by Opera then Firefox. IE9 beta beats all of them incidentally.

        For general browsing speed, Chrome and Opera are close, followed by Firefox.

        For JavaScript execution (benchmarks and usage), it’s Chrome, Opera then Firefox.

        For memory, Firefox generally uses the least (they’ve worked hard on that following all the v2 flak), followed by Chrome, then Opera. (Although it varies depending on the tabs and sites visited. Firefox doesn’t always reclaim what it could either).

        For site rendering issues, Firefox is usually the most stable, followed by Chrome then Opera (which isn’t tested as much).

        Application stability is a tricky one and all three have crashed on me. Chrome probably wins because add-ons rarely cause issues and it’s tabs are separate processes.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        @WW

        I have demolished your sources for the 2% claim.

        Have you? We’ll say no more about it then. Pick any number you like.

        Only you have stated “Opera is tiny and irrelevant”. Please don’t.

      • WinkyWolla

        Craig, please stop repeating these false claims.

        “For JavaScript execution (benchmarks and usage), it’s Chrome, Opera then Firefox.”

        This is flat out wrong. I have shown you repeatedly how Opera consistently comes out faster. Why do you insist on making claims you know are false?

        “For memory, Firefox generally uses the least”

        That’s because Firefox’s memory handling is extremely primitive, whereas Opera dynamically adapts. If you have a lot of memory, Opera will use more because it makes things go faster.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        JavaScript was certainly faster in Chrome on the recent string concatenation tests I did. That’s not to say Opera won’t beat it in other tests.

        So you’re saying Opera uses more memory (when it needs to). Isn’t that what I said?!!

      • WinkyWolla

        So now Chrome *might* be faster at some cherry-picked test? Right.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        The URLs you provided compared Opera with Chrome 5. It’s now at version 7.

        But, just for you, I’ve just run the SunSpider benchmark on Chrome 7 and Opera 10.63. Chrome was 20% faster. Please don’t take my word for it — try it for yourself.

      • WinkyWolla

        Actually, I have given you several URLs, including one that showed Chrome 7 vs. Opera.

        Opera 11 also beats Chrome 8, as the benchmarks clearly show.

      • WinkyWolla

        Isn’t it a bit pathetic that you basically ignore the links people give you

  • pixelsoul

    I use Chrome and FF for my everyday use. Chrome for just surfing and FF when I am working on a site for all my lovely extensions. I have tried Opera off and on and it just doesn’t offer me anything that would make me want to use it.

  • goldy

    i tried opera too, it was fast , with fast js interpreter, but there was problem again with css definitions and sometimes js.
    it has a good developer debugger, and has skins.
    but then came chrome, and i decided to separate browsers use for work and entertainig.
    chrome for just browsing and firefox for just developing and debugging websites.
    for me the best css interpreter is the one of firefox

  • Sphamandla

    Opera is not that that popular a browser i think one of the reasons why is because they it doesn’t excel in a particular area. leaving more room for all of its competitors.

    • WinkyWolla

      What are you talking about? Opera is the fastest, smallest and most secure browser (not as many security holes). If that isn’t excelling in multiple areas, I don’t know what is.

      Also, Opera has more than 140 million users. If that isn’t popular, I don’t know what is.

  • Medden

    Apple Ipad released April 2010.

    Opera Ipad browser released….. no current plans.

    Opera Iphone browser, update to support HD resolution or Ipad format….. no current plans.

    It’s surely a 2 or 3 line code change to recognise a new screen resolution. Hundreds of Iphone apps have managed it..

    Looks like Opera has already missed the tablet browser boat.

    • WinkyWolla

      Not sure what you are talking about. Just the other day Opera announced pinch zoom and hardware acceleration for the iPhone. The CEO has also said that they were likely to make an iPad version.

      But why are you equating tablets with the iPad? Even if Opera never made an iPad version, there would still be hundreds of other tablets out there. And unlike the iPad, it would probably be possible to release a full tablet browser for those.

      So claiming that the tablet browser boat was missed because of the iPad is rather silly.

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Possibly, but perhaps the main reason is that Apple don’t allow any applications which can emulate or interpret code. That includes JavaScript-enabled browsers. Opera Mini was launched on the iPhone because it renders pages server-side and delivers a lightweight page to the device. That’s OK for a small-screen device with a slow connection, but I suspect it’s not worth competing with Safari on the faster and larger iPad.

  • josh79

    In my opinion Opera is better than most of the other browsers in most of the categoriea above. It’s as fast or faster than chrome, doubt it’s less stable. More customizable than Firefox, and generally rich on features. The fact that most of the others have categories they are weak in cannot really be used against Opera.

    I like Opera because I feel they try harder then the rest. They never seems to give up and I guess thats why they do have the millions of users (even if thats a smaller fraction of the web).

    As for tablets. Even they were on all of them wouldnt that just be a small fraction of all the PCs? I say keep on innovating and the more people will come.

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Is it as fast as Chrome? Most benchmarks show Chrome excelling in that area. That’s not to say Opera is slow or that it’s noticeable in every-day usage, but it’s not always the fastest. And IE9 is faster still.

      But seriously, is it really more customisable than Firefox? The initial install may be, but Firefox can be extended indefinitely. Opera may catch up now extensions have arrived, but Firefox has a 7-year head start.

      Netbooks had something like 10% of the PC market. If tablets overtake them, that’s a serious number of devices ripe for Opera’s taking.

      • WinkyWolla

        Most benchmarks actually show Opera excelling when it comes to speed. I have no idea what kind of benchmarks you have been looking at, but Opera has been beating chrome ever since 10.5 was released (see links below).

        And claiming that IE9 is faster? What do you base that on exactly? I mean, you can probably find a couple of tests where Chrome edges ahead of Opera even though most speed tests show Opera well ahead, but IE9 is nowhere near Opera and Chrome’s speed.

        The bottom line is that, at best, you can claim that there is no clear speed winner when comparing Opera and Chrome. In reality, Opera is constantly slightly ahead. But what you most certainly cannot claim is that “Chrome excels at speed, and Opera excels ant nothing.”

        You did see these links, right?

        Opera 10.5 leaps to beta, holds on to unexpected performance lead: http://www.betanews.com/article/Opera-105-leaps-to-beta-holds-on-to-unexpected-performance-lead/1265934703

        Firefox in the dust: Opera poised to reclaim browser performance lead: http://www.betanews.com/article/Firefox-in-the-dust-Opera-poised-to-reclaim-browser-performance-lead/1286824681

        Even with a serious performance regression, Opera still beat Chrome: http://www.betanews.com/article/Google-Chrome-5-loses-points-wins-categories-against-Opera-105-beta/1266961722

      • josh79

        Whats your sources for you claims? Peacekeeper? Sunspider? Even on Mozillas own test Opera beats them. And if you don’t know about the customizations in Opera you should really do some homework.

        But wait… You are a troll… Jeeze…

      • mathieuf

        Customizable: Are you aware of the skins available, and how you move components around, add and remove buttons, etc., etc.? All of this has been available for years.

  • Radoslav Stankov

    I have always disliked Opera so … I really can’t see a valid reason for one to choose Opera over the other browsers.

    • WinkyWolla

      Disliked Opera? How come?

  • heh

    # Opera is good all-round browser but
    # doesn’t excel in a particular area.
    Except being smaller and faster than Chrome, of course.
    # If you want speed, use Chrome
    No, if you want speed, use Opera:
    http://www.betanews.com/article/Firefox-in-the-dust-Opera-poised-to-reclaim-browser-performance-lead/1286824681
    One has to wonder why you insist on insulting Opera and its users, and falsely claim that it doesn’t excel at anything. Knowing the fact that Opera is faster than Chrome, will you now write about how Opera is super fast, while Chrome doesn’t really excel in a particular area?

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Perhaps the new version of Opera will be faster. Great, but it’s still a beta like IE9 and Chrome 7. Few people will use it until the final version.

      How exactly have I insulted Opera or its users? The current version of Chrome is faster than the current version of Opera. Not by much perhaps, but it still tops the benchmark charts.

      • WinkyWolla

        Oh please. Opera and Chrome have been fighting a nearly equal battle for the performance crown, Opera almost always managing to inch ahead of Chrome:

        http://www.betanews.com/article/Opera-105-leaps-to-beta-holds-on-to-unexpected-performance-lead/1265934703

        http://www.betanews.com/article/Firefox-in-the-dust-Opera-poised-to-reclaim-browser-performance-lead/1286824681

        It seems rather obvious that you are baiting Opera users by constantly repeating the false claims about market share, and even claiming that “Chrome excels at speed, Opera excels at nothing.” Your bias is very clear. You keep ignoring how Opera has been beating Chrome all along.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        Rightly or wrongly, Chrome is known for it’s speed. Whatever the benchmarks say, it starts and feels faster — certainly on Windows 7 and Linux (in my experience, it’s also a little more stable).

        I’m sure Opera is faster in certain areas but, in my opinion, it doesn’t have the same reputation.

        Why do you consider this any more biased than your view?

      • WinkyWolla

        Opera is definitely known for its speed. The fact is that Opera is consistently shown to be faster. And now you are going to retreat into “feels faster” and appeal to emotions?

        And your claims were not about reputation (which is also a bogus claim, because Opera’s reputation is exactly that of being the fastest), but about actual performance. You claimed that “Chrome excels at speed, Opera at nothing.”

        I consider your view biased because you are always denigrating Opera, and making false claims about it. I am not biased because my opinions are based on factual data.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        You claimed that “Chrome excels at speed, Opera at nothing.”

        No, I claimed that Opera was good at everything but doesn’t have a reputation for excelling in one particular area. By comparison, Chrome is known for speed and simplicity but little else.

        I consider your view biased because you are always denigrating Opera, and making false claims about it.

        For example?

        I am not biased because my opinions are based on factual data.

        That made me chuckle!

        You insist Opera has a 7% market share (based on Opera’s own report). Believe that if you wish, but I’m not convinced and I think it deserves a higher figure.

        Unless you think the browser doesn’t need the publicity?…

      • WinkyWolla

        “No, I claimed that Opera was good at everything but doesn’t have a reputation for excelling in one particular area.”

        Except for being the fastest and the one with the fewest security holes. But for some reason, you decided to not state those facts.

        “For example?”

        See above. Also, see my other posts. “Opera excels at nothing”, etc.

        “You insist Opera has a 7% market share (based on Opera’s own report).”

        Opera’s own reports, that are reported to their own share holders, and part of their audited numbers. Yes.

        “Believe that if you wish, but I’m not convinced and I think it deserves a higher figure.”

        You are not contributing to giving it a higher figure by repeating old anti-Opera talking points like “Opera doesn’t have any users” and “Opera doesn’t excel at anything.”

        “Unless you think the browser doesn’t need the publicity?…”

        It doesn’t need constant bashing.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        Crikey. I may have to start bashing Opera … it’d get fewer complaints!

  • WinkyWolla

    “Opera’s market share is the most controversial issue and a flame war will erupt the moment I mention the magical 2%.”

    That’s probably because that number is incorrect. Would users of other browsers accept it if you kept repeating false claims about their particular browser of choice?

    No they wouldn’t.

    Case in point: http://www.informationweek.com/news/windows/security/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=164301700&pgno=4

    “The most fanatical users will claim various conspiracies, inaccuracies, and
    fallacies.”

    Sorry, but how is someone who points out inaccuracies and fallacies “fanatical”? Sounds like you just want to brush off perfectly valid criticism by attacking others with vague accusations…

    What conspiracies are you referring to?

    “According to most web statistics, the desktop edition of Opera has the lowest market share of the five top browsers. It hovers at around 2% and has barely moved since it was launched over a decade ago.”

    I’m not sure where you got that from. Even Net Applications claims that Opera’s market share has gone up over time. Net Application, by the way, claims that Opera desktop’s market share is higher than Opera Mini, but Opera Mini has more users. Go figure. But I guess you will brush this off as another “conspiracy theory.”

    “However, it’s not experiencing accelerated growth like Chrome.”

    Then again, Chrome is advertised all over the web by Google, a huge online ad monopoly. And by the way, Opera is indeed experiencing accelerated growth. Without having a monopoly pushing it everywhere.
    But seriously, why do you insist on constantly repeating these false claims about Opera?

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      QED.

      Here are a few web statistics sources…
      http://gs.statcounter.com/
      http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp
      http://www.webreference.com/stats/browser.html
      http://www.w3counter.com/globalstats.php

      SitePoint’s own statistics show 2.2%.

      None are ever fully accurate of course, but Opera is consistently lower than IE, Firefox, Chrome and Safari.

      • WinkyWolla

        Opera’s market share worldwide is around 7% (more than 140 million Opera users out of almost 2 billion total).

        All of the stats you are linking to are basically useless. W3schools.com is only for that specific site, for example.

        Also, it is well known that these sites are unable to tell the difference between Opera Mini, Opera Turbo and Opera without either. So thousands of Opera Mini or Opera Turbo users will be counted as just one because the stats aren’t able to count correctly. And that’s just one error source.

      • josh79

        Whats the point of arguing about whether opera have 2 or 3% market share really? If they have 50 million PC users (out of 140 million on mobile+pc) it is much bigger than most other software I can think of out there…

        BTW: just downloaded the new alpha because of this article so your doing something good today.

      • Zig

        A lot of users mask opera as Ie, me included, this affects the stats you’ve listed.

        I also find operas download manager as the best amongst browsers.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        The 140 million installations was reported by Opera themselves and included desktop and mobile users. It didn’t account for people who have multiple installations — I currently have at least 5. Nor does it account for actual usage: I have Opera installed but use it as a secondary browser.

        But, if you want to assume 7%, go right ahead. There’s obviously no need to publicise the browser any further — it’s doing incredibly well, beating Safari and catching Chrome.

        @Zig: Opera used to masquerade as IE, but hasn’t done that by default for many years.

      • WinkyWolla

        Craig, when will you stop trying to make up excuses for your false claims? Opera’s numbers do not count installations. They count active users. Having it installed does not get you counted. You have to use it regularly.

        As for spoofing, Opera still has to do that on many sites, making the stats even less reliable (in addition to thousands of Opera Turbo users being counted as just one by stats sites).

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        And which claims are those? I’m reporting what independent sites show. Why are they ‘false’? Why is Opera’s own report ‘true’? Where are your statistics?

        In addition, why does Opera need to spoof? Why don’t the other browsers do it? It may have been necessary a few years ago, but rarely is today and, as far as I’m aware, Opera no longer does it.

      • WinkyWolla

        False claims about market share. False claims about speed. And so on.

        Also:

        1. Would users of other browsers accept it if you kept repeating false claims about their particular browser of choice?
        2. How is someone who points out inaccuracies and fallacies “fanatical”?
        3. What conspiracies are you referring to?

        As for your claims about spoofing, they are wrong. Opera does need to spoof today, because sites often exclude other browsers than IE and “Netscape” (Firefox). In fact, most compatibility problems in Opera are due to browser sniffing.

        Opera doesn’t spoof by default, but it spoofs for a lot of sites. It does that automatically because Opera has a system where it downloads compatibility updates automatically. Like IE8, which also needed to do various tricks because thousands of sites broke.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        Again, why are they false claims? Does Opera have a smaller share than IE, Firefox, Chrome and Safari? Why is Chrome’s reputation for speed undeserved?

        But in answer to your points…

        1. I don’t recall other browser users accusing me (or other sites) of making false claims.

        2. Fanatic defn: a person with an extreme and uncritical enthusiasm or zeal.

        3. You’re not aware of any? That’s good. You can’t accuse me of bias for or against any particular vendor or browser then.

        In fact, most compatibility problems in Opera are due to browser sniffing.

        I disagree. Most compatibility problems are caused by a lack of website testing in Opera. That’s wrong and wouldn’t be a issue if Opera had a larger market share.

      • WinkyWolla

        “Again, why are they false claims?”

        I have explained that numerous times by now

        “Why is Chrome’s reputation for speed undeserved?”

        Because Opera is faster.

        “I don’t recall other browser users accusing me (or other sites) of making false claims.”

        Then you are singling out Opera, and making false claims only about that.

        “Fanatic defn: a person with an extreme and uncritical enthusiasm or zeal.”

        Again: How is someone who points out inaccuracies and fallacies “fanatical”?

        “You’re not aware of any? That’s good. You can’t accuse me of bias for or against any particular vendor or browser then.”

        You are the one who made a claim about conspiracies. Please answer the question.

        “Most compatibility problems are caused by a lack of website testing in Opera.”

        You are wrong. Opera’s own developers who actually work on these things have stated that most are caused by browser sniffing. Do you claim to know better than the people who actually work on this, and probably have all sorts of actual statistics on it?

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        Then you are singling out Opera, and making false claims only about that.

        Despite your claims about statistics and your unbiased attitude to browsers, you didn’t jump to Microsoft’s defence when I recently reported IE usage had dropped below 50%? Perhaps you missed it?

        You also missed the question “Does Opera have a smaller share than IE, Firefox, Chrome and Safari?”

        Opera is faster.

        I didn’t ask whether Opera was faster. I asked why Chrome has a reputation for speed that — rightly or wrongly — eclipses Opera? Is it Google’s or Opera’s marketing? Is it spoofed or selective benchmarks? Is it an urban myth? Is it this article? Is it a conspiracy (which you appear to be alluding to)?

        Opera’s own developers … have stated that most are caused by browser sniffing

        Really? So you or Opera have some statistics about sniffing vs testing causing browser incompatibility issues? That’s pretty specific, but very handy. I’d love to see them…

      • WinkyWolla

        “Despite your claims about statistics and your unbiased attitude to browsers, you didn’t jump to Microsoft’s defence when I recently reported IE usage had dropped below 50%? Perhaps you missed it?”

        Why would I jump to the defense of the browser that has single-handedly been holding back the web for more than a decade? Also, yes, I missed that story.

        “I didn’t ask whether Opera was faster. I asked why Chrome has a reputation for speed that — rightly or wrongly — eclipses Opera?”

        It doesn’t. Opera is known to be the fastest browser.

        “So you or Opera have some statistics about sniffing vs testing causing browser incompatibility issues?”

        In case you didn’t notice, they have teams of people working on compatibility. Part of this includes adding sites to a list for sites that require spoofing. They have blogs about this over at myopera.com.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        You appear to be admitting to a little browser bias there!

        As for the compatibility tests, I’d love a URL. I’m yet to see a report about your claims on the Opera site or elsewhere?

        There is a serious point to this request. I detest browser sniffing in all it’s forms (including conditional CSS). It may have been necessary a decade ago, but that’s not the case today. If you or Opera have evidence of widespread use of the practice, it’s something we can highlight on SitePoint and suggest alternatives.

        However, your assumption that Opera isn’t (as) affected by compatibility problems is more worrying. Taking your argument to it’s logical conclusion, a developer could assume Opera testing is not necessary because it’ll simply work (or Opera will fix it their end). That’s not my experience and I have frequently blasted Google, Microsoft and other web app providers for not testing the browser.

      • WinkyWolla

        I am not admitting to any browser bias. I am pointing out your biases, and misinformation. You even ignore people’s comments with URLs and everything.

        If you want to learn about browser sniffing and crap like that, read Opera’s blogs. Since you have ignored all the URLs I have given you so far I don’t particularly feel like linking to them, though.

        Yes, sites will usually just work in Opera. It’s when sites start messing around with browser sniffing that most problems appear.

  • http://www.ciudadesmayas.com elviajero

    Opera is great and has neat features like proxies and turbo options, still when you load a site it could often show the text like appearance while the page finish loading and then applies the css. I don’t like that. Anyway is what I use the most on my cell phone and smartbook, and that doesn’t mean “just browsing”, I do complicated stuff on my server via opera mini and opera mobile for emergencies.

    I still prefer Firefox, but lately FF takes more and more time to load, Opera is faster now and can also link my bookmarks across my diff browsers (office, home, etc) yes I know other browsers can do that, but Opera can link to my palm, smartbook and cell phone too. Opera is the only option to stay connected with my bookmarks across all my devices.

  • roosevelt

    I got a feeling Opera’s going to be the next big browser for web developers. My guess is, Opera really isn’t implementing the community development model.

    For instance, FF and followed by chrome the whole opensource and community development took the browser wars by the storm. Similarly, the android phones are kicking ass because of the opensource and the availability of features.

    So, if Opera adopts this model and actually makes it really easy to develop plug-ins, I’m sure many companies and users would jump in.

    At the moment FF is my favorite because of the powerful dev plugins, even though I despise its memory usage. Had my fun with chrome for a while but its plugins are just horrible!

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Opera certainly deserves a larger market share. My main concern is that few companies test their sites with Opera. That will change if web developers adopt it.

  • http://www.deathshadow.com deathshadow60

    I’ve been using Opera as my primary browser pretty much since 8.5 dropped. At the time Firefox was a buggy unstable unusable train wreck (NOT that it’s gotten much better), and Chrome wasn’t even a twinkle in a FLOSS fanboys eye yet.

    Generally I don’t have the compatibility issues with sites most people do as all the sites I visit work just fine — but as a rule if a site doesn’t work I just don’t visit it… Though in my experience the only sites that don’t work are the ones that are IE only (so it’s not like FF, Saffy or Chrome make a difference), or the nimrod who wrote it intentionally added server side browser sniffing to try and block Opera users — which is why Opera added the “mask as netscape” and “mask as IE” options way back on Opera 6 in the first place!

    I love Opera. Most of the features I like about it aren’t even available in other browsers even as extensions (drag and drop favicons, start bar, tabs in portrait mode on one side of the browser instead of across the top, etc…) and the ones that are (like flip/rocker navigation) available as extensions generally don’t work right.

    BUT… It has a few failings.

    1) It doesn’t use a native widget set do it doesn’t look like a native application by default. They do include a ‘native’ skin but it never quite feels right. I think this is where many people call it ‘ugly’… which is often the only complaint you hear about it. Of course they hired some famous artsy guy to clean it up, who then proceeded to strip all color from it and restyle it to look like a darker Safari… and IMHO Safari has the ugliest browser UI on the planet.

    2) Every iteration they add more whitespace around elements in the default skin — It’s why I use a custom skin with it to get rid of all that.

    3) Point Zero releases have always been buggier than the release candidates before them. Even DUMBER they have this habit of having ‘new skins’ that they don’t introduce until the point zero — making the RC kinda pointless since then the skin isn’t checked for bugs. This screwed the ‘start bar’ in the last .0 release.

    Now, there’s also a bit of legacy stigma attached to it. You’ll STILL have people out there saying they don’t use Opera because the free version has advertising — something that hasn’t been true since September 2005! They also have the habit of just making themselves look petty and stupid. Can’t compete? Litigate. Whenever you hear about any sort of litigation against a browser maker Opera seems to be at the forefront… Can’t innovate? Litigate! Really sad for what’s a really innovative company.

    Their website is no winner either — It’s like they never even HEARD of the WCAG… that the browser with perhaps the BEST accessibility aids out there has one of the most inaccessbile websites ever written should be enough to hang their heads in shame. Absurdly undersized fixed metric fonts, grey text on white background, 400k+ of bloat to deliver 1.5k of plaintext, images so large they blow up on Opera mobile and Safari on the iPhone? Improper heading orders? Admittedly the markup is nowhere near as bad as it used to be, but the design is absolutely horrid and the accessibiltiy nonexistant!

    But really I don’t think any of this is Opera’s real problem… What I think is wrong is their marketing; or more specifically their COMPLETE LACK OF IT! When open source software run by a non-profit organization can afford TV spots during a superbowl, why can’t a commercial company even afford a full page glossy ad in a mag once and a while or even a 2up in syndicated papers?

    Even their own president admitted at one point that they’ve never really had a marketing plan… SAY WHAT?!? … and when they DO advertising it’s always pointless/ineffective wastes of money like that $200K billboard in Redmond that was so poorly worded most people thought it was an advertisement for IE. “Be a real Internet Explorer”… You know how much advertising space $200k would get you in newspaper inserts?

    Another example Opera’s NOT heavily branding on the machines that come with their browser… There are phones that come with Opera Mobile or Opera Mini — Go out and look at the packaging for such devices… IF Opera is mentioned at all it’s in tiny little text on the back in the disclaimers… Look at the DS and Wii browsers — no mention even on the packaging that it’s Opera, and when you start it up the only indication it’s Opera is cyan text on white background in one of the bottom corners — an illegible/nearly invisible color combination!

    WHERE IS THE BIG RED BRANDING O? Really, they’re providing companies with a product, why no marketing push? If nVidia and AMD can do it when other manufacturers make video cards, why can’t Opera get a triangle shaped sticker “Powered by Opera Mini” with the big red O slapped on all the devices that ship with it?

    Of course even the name is screwing them over… Opera. The word makes me think of stuck up socialites in rented formalwear speaking in cheesy fake eurotrash accents. The words that immediately enter my head when I hear “Opera” is stuffy, stodgy, and boring.

    They need to take a look at marketing successes like Ubuntu or OSX — and give their product releases cutesy codenames. You can learn a LOT looking at either of those when it comes to marketing… Karmic Koala, Gutsy Gibbon, Warty Warthog — Panther, Lynx, Leopard, Lion… Beats the hell out of version numbers when your actual product name can imply a negative connotation. (Like the dirty hippy drum circle that comes to mind for “ubuntu”).

    I would even go so far if I was making a marketing push as to consider a total rebranding and product relaunch with a much catchier name, cutsy mascot/logo and paid inserts in various ‘free’ fishwrappers in target markets. Their branding… SUCKS. BAD.

    • heh

      # Even DUMBER they have this habit of having ‘new skins’
      # that they don’t introduce until the point zero — making
      # the RC kinda pointless

      This is completely false. They have never introduced new skins in a final version without testing it in an RC first.

      # They also have the habit of just making themselves look
      # petty and stupid. Can’t compete? Litigate.

      What litigation? Opera never sued anyone. All they did was to, with support from the likes of Google and Mozilla, report Microsoft’s illegal activities to the authorities. Isn’t it a bit hypocritical of you to whine about Opera when Mozilla, Google and others were part of the antitrust case as well?

      And again, Opera never sued Microsoft. So claiming that they are litigious is flat out wrong.

      # one of the most inaccessbile websites ever written

      What do you base this claim on?

      # But really I don’t think any of this is Opera’s real
      # problem… What I think is wrong is their marketing;
      # or more specifically their COMPLETE LACK OF IT!

      What are you talking about? They are doing all sorts of marketing, including viral videos that are getting millions of views and a huge buzz all over the web.

      # When open source software run by a non-profit
      # organization can afford TV spots during a superbowl,
      # why can’t a commercial company even afford a full
      # page glossy ad in a mag once and a while or even a
      # 2up in syndicated papers?

      1. If Mozilla can afford TV spots, it’s because Google paid for it.

      2. Opera has done ads.

      3. Opera has even done ads in Times Square.

      So what was that you were saying again?

      # Even their own president admitted at one point that
      # they’ve never really had a marketing plan…

      He did not such thing. He was claimed to have said that they don’t spend money on marketing, but that is obviously a misquote, seeing as they have indeed spent money on actual ads. So you are spreading false claims based on false quotes.

      # that $200K billboard in Redmond

      Really? $200K? How do you know how much they paid?

      # Another example Opera’s NOT heavily branding on the
      # machines that come with their browser

      You clearly don’t know anything about hos to run a business. When someone pays for a product, you don’t get to demand that they place ads for what they paid for all over the place.

      # Really, they’re providing companies with a product, why
      # no marketing push?

      Because it is not Opera’s right to demand that their customers promote them?

      # Of course even the name is screwing them over… Opera.

      Yeah, because “Apple” or “Firefox” is so much better… Uh, no actually. It isn’t.

      # They need to take a look at marketing successes like
      # Ubuntu or OSX

      What marketing successes? Linux and Mac are still tiny on the desktop.

      # Their branding… SUCKS. BAD.

      It does not. In fact, it is one of the most well known brands in the mobile world.

      • Robbo

        I agree with him on the name. I feel Opera could relaunch under a new name and get a lot more people using their browser. Opera is just a bad name. Although there are a lot of things that could go wrong with that…

        Other then that, that guy is an idiot.

      • WinkyWolla

        “Opera” is no worse than “Microsoft” (micro soft? LOL), “Apple” or “Firefox.” Or “Wii”!

        Wii alone proves how people who think they have a clue about branding are actually clueless. Everyone was whining about how Wii was a terrible name, and lo and behold, it’s killing the other consoles.

        And “Opera” doesn’t seem to be preventing the company from completely dominating the mobile browser market either!

      • http://www.deathshadow.com deathshadow60

        >> This is completely false. They have never introduced
        >> new skins in a final version without testing it in an RC first.

        So apparantly you don’t remember the RC’s for 9.0 or 10.0 — 10.0 in particular was really bad on that since it broke even simple things like the drag and drop favicons and custom buttons that worked FINE on the old skin, or the ‘native’ skin on the RC before it!

        >> What litigation? Opera never sued anyone. All they did was to,
        >> with support from the likes of Google and Mozilla, report
        >> Microsoft’s illegal activities to the authorities.

        … and getting the government to litigate for you is different from doing it yourself how exactly? Much less you get into situations like the 2007 filing that even Mozilla and Google basically said “You’re on your own with that one”

        >> ## one of the most inaccessbile websites ever written
        >> What do you base this claim on?

        The absurdly undersized fixed metric fonts, improper heading orders confusing the crap out of screen readers like jaws, color contrasts of text to background that are below accessibility minimums? You know, the WCAG? This is a web development website, right? You’ve at least HEARD of it?!? Much less the use of 15k of markup, 133k of scripts and 80k of CSS (that they don’t even BOTHER trying to compress!?!) to deliver 1.5k of plaintext?

        >> What are you talking about? They are doing all sorts
        >> of marketing, including viral videos that are getting
        >> millions of views and a huge buzz all over the web.

        WHERE?!? BUZZ? WHAT BUZZ? “Whatju talkin ’bout Willis?” If you mean the two or three barely intelligible stoner slacker videos on youtube, color me unimpressed. I’m reminded of the old David Whittaker albums “Millions sold in Europe”.

        >> 2. Opera has done ads.

        … and yet I’ve never seen one in person. Funny since I’m a huge advocate and fan of the browser itself.

        >> 3. Opera has even done ads in Times Square.

        REALLY? Somehow I doubt that. Of course since that’s an uber expensive slot with a low turnover…

        >> He did not such thing. He was claimed to have said that
        >> they don’t spend money on marketing, but that is obviously
        >> a misquote, seeing as they have indeed spent money on actual
        >> ads. So you are spreading false claims based on false quotes.

        Given their ‘presence’ and share, just how false could it be?

        >> Really? $200K? How do you know how much they paid?

        That’s the number that was thrown around the Opera forums two or three years ago… when this same question was basically asked and all these same things were said.

        >> You clearly don’t know anything about hos to run a business. When
        >> someone pays for a product, you don’t get to demand that they
        >> place ads for what they paid for all over the place.

        No, but you can ask politely and work out a cross marketing deal. You know, cross marketing? You pimp me, I pimp you? Win/win for both parties? I’d point out these same type of devices from the same manufacturers often have stickers for google, chrome, skype on the PACKAGING? You apparently know jack about marketing or business… that or you’ve never actually bought a retail box package of a consumer electronics device more complex than a Walkman.

        Neither do they, after all we’re talking the company who ran the “Opera 9 Party” marketing campaign featuring a transexual, a toothless unwashed homeless lady, and the Villiage People. Gee I wonder why that fell flat on it’s face.

        >> Yeah, because “Apple” or “Firefox” is so much better… Uh, no actually. It isn’t.

        Firefox sounds cool and trendy. Hard pressed to think of negative connotations for it. Apple is kinda meaningless in a way, so it too doesn’t engender instant dislike. Chrome — ooh, shiny! Gecko — everyone loves the gecko…

        >> What marketing successes? Linux and Mac are still tiny
        >> on the desktop.

        “on the desktop” — Think of it in these terms:
        IF you were talking vendor sales – single vendors selling machines — Apple has outsold DELL, Gateway and HP if taken on a 1:1 basis. They have recorded record profits for three quarters STRAIGHT and have a history of profit margins above and beyond ANY other hardware vendor.

        … and you question it being a marketing success?!? Much less the ubiquitiveness of the ipod, iTunes — even windblows and linsux users use iTunes!

        (hell’s freezing over again, I just defended Apple)

        … and how many linux distro’s are there? Ok, now of all linux distro’s which one is used the MOST according to Distrowatch? Yes, linux penetration on the desktop is still a joke — but MOST of the progress on getting normal users to try it and MOST of the people using it are using which distro again?

        >> It does not. In fact, it is one of the most well known
        >> brands in the mobile world.

        … and sliding in relevance as the other players in the market start to equal it’s capacities. How many people are really going out of their way to install Opera mini on android or the App Store version on their iPhone instead of using Chrome or Safari? WebOS? Comes with a perfectly good webkit based browser… The only reason Opera had traction in mobile was look at the old alternatives prior to two year ago! IE 5.5? (IE6 only became available with Mobile 6 in 2008) Blazer? uZard? Netfront? Rinky useless toys compared to either mobile or mini. It got the penetration it did because nothing else on the platforms even came close on usability. Thier loss in share is NOT even close to accounted for by the (really rapid recent) growth in the market, meaning they’re actually hemmoraging users to Chrome and Safari in the mobile world.

        Their branding had nothing to do with the success of their BRAND in the mobile world. (and there is a difference between those) The quality of the product and being the only REAL player in the market worth using is what gave it that — and frankly now in that regard Chrome and Safari are kicking it’s ass.

      • WinkyWolla

        @deathshadow60

        I’m not going to bother dignifying some of your inane outbursts of obvious nonsense with a response, but I will clarify some points.

        You really should avoid commenting on things you don’t know a whole lot about.

        1) Reporting a crime to the government is obviously not the same as suing someone else. That should go without saying.

        2) Opera’s marketing is a lot more than YouTube videos, although the millions of views they are getting for their viral videos is pretty impressive. They certainly did not spend $200K on billboard ads next to Microsoft’s office.

        3) Cross-promotions aren’t necessarily a good thing or even something the customer wants to agree on. Again, you need to educate yourself about doing business deals before even trying to discuss this.

        4) You should just give up on discussing names. There was a massive backlash against Firefox. Most people hated the name. It’s the same story as with Wii. Most people hate the name, but most people are very often wrong.

        5) Apple’s market share on the desktop is still tiny. Of course Apple’s profits margins are huge. Their successful products have been outside the desktop, where it is still lagging behind with a low share of the market. Apple certainly had success with their mobile products, just like Opera did.

        6) Opera is not at all sliding in relevance, but actually growing its market share. And they are making countless deals with mobile operators across the world, and every time they do, their mobile market share shoots straight up. They also joined the Wholesale Application Community recently as the only browser vendor, and that’s where all the big mobile operators are playing. Not to mention Opera’s existing deals with Vodafone, AT&T, and so on.

        Anyone who claims that Opera’s relevance in the mobile market is sliding is obviously deeply ignorant of how that market works.

        In fact, Opera is even being bundled with Android devices to replace the default browser there.

        7) Millions apparently chose to install Opera Mini on the iPhone. And they kept using it, as Opera’s statistics show. Again, please educate yourself.

        8) Claiming that Opera is hemorrhaging users to mobile Chrome and Safari is simply nonsensica. Both of them are dropping in usage, while Opera is growing like crazy. They are adding something like two new active users every single second of the day.

        9) Opera’s brand is a huge success in the mobile market. That’s the point. And again, Opera is growing faster in the mobile market than Chrome and Safari.

        Please educate yourself, OK?

  • Chaals

    (Dis?)claimer: I actually work at Opera. You can find more about me by looking up my name.

    Yeah, it seems that writing about a browser makes it easy to get into a flame war.

    A few comments on things people have said:
    The 140 million is active users. It’s also a statistic (ergo subject to error, the most likely being people actively running multiple versions of Opera).

    I’m pretty sure we didn’t pay $200k for the Redmond billboard. Our marketing budgets aren’t backed by another big company, and we use a lot of our money to pay engineers.

    Tablets are an interesting area we are working in. Another one is TV. There are various other kinds of device that can run a browser too – among our clients are Ford (an F-series truck doesn’t fit in your pocket, but it’s another mobile browser :) ) and suppliers to Airbus (for a really really big, really expensive mobile browser, you can’t go much past a whole airplane :) ).

    We are working actively to raise our profile as a very developer-friendly browser – extensions are just the latest thing in a path that has included Dragonfly (the debugging tool that can remotely connect to devices running Opera), releasing Opera mobile on desktop platforms, providing a large amount of customisation and testing-specific functionality, and being nice people who spend a lot of time talking to developers ;) This is important, because getting developers to test in Opera is an important component for maintaining site compatibility.

    Turbo mode is well-understood in some of our big markets, where flat-rate internet and even fast connections (or what most people in North America would think of as “wow, that’s slow”) are a luxury most people don’t have.

    Unite is a concept that takes people a while to understand, in terms of how it helps *them*, but there are a bunch of interesting things you can do with it. Especially if you combine it with the ability to write web apps that interact directly with the Device, like native apps do except running across multiple platforms.

    (And as you may have guessed by now, I don’t put a huge amount of faith in most statistics, but I also don’t think it’s worth arguing over them much. They’re qualitatively useful, and more so the more information you have about their accuracy and bias, but generally unlikely to be hugely horribly wrong or exactly correct).

    Anyway, interesting article. Thanks.

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Thanks Chaals, that’s very useful.

      Incidentally, I’m wasn’t singling out Turbo or Unite. I use Turbo and I’m sure many people can’t live without Unite. However, they’re not life-changing browser features like, say, tabs (Opera was the first mainstream browser to implement them) or bookmark sync.

      Anyway, best of luck with extensions and I’m glad to hear tablets are on the agenda too!

    • http://www.deathshadow.com deathshadow60

      >> and we use a lot of our money to pay engineers.

      … and it REALLY does show in the browser! I love the browser.

      Shame it doesn’t show in the website — especially that rinky forums, black hole or bug reporting, and effectively now hidden developer area’s that I STILL can’t find without either a bookmark or a google search. (made all the worse by the ‘cross browser development’ forum area being deleted outright)

      • WinkyWolla

        @eathshadow60

        “effectively now hidden developer area’s that I STILL can’t find without either a bookmark or a google search”

        You can’t find something that has its own top level menu on http://www.opera.com? Nice.

        “made all the worse by the ‘cross browser development’ forum area being deleted outright”

        What are you talking about? There’s a forum right there on the main forum page called “Opera and cross-browser Web design.”

    • WinkyWolla

      “they’re not life-changing browser features”

      Maybe not if you live in a big US city with unlimited broadband. More so if you live somewhere with crappy connections that keep dropping.

      BTW, tabs were not implemented first in Opera. InternetWorks or whatever it was called did it first.

  • Orracle

    Dragonfly alone is reason enough for me to use Opera – fantastic tool!

  • dk

    History has shown that the most popular products aren’t necessarily the best. IE is a living example, iPhone is a living example. I don’t see why Opera users should be so obsessed with defending it. You like Opera? Good for you. Others don’t? Don’t bother. I personally love Opera, but I don’t really care what browser someone uses. If it’s not IE it’s good enough.

  • Cindy Auligny

    I’ve tried Opera as my default browser. But I removed it lately. It’s fast enough but not really as fast as Chrome. Its add-ons is nothing when considering with Firefox.
    I also love Opera icon. But now, it doesn’t exist in my desktop anymore.

  • http://cydewaze.org cydewaze

    Holy crap Craig! You weren’t kidding about the flamewar thing!

    I’ve used the Linux version of Opera, but I only for testing purposes (even Opera users should see the site the way I intended it to look). I don’t know why, but I’ve found it a bit quirky to use otherwise. Maybe it’s the Linux version, or maybe it’s because I’m so used to FF. I find Chrome a bit quirky too actually.

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      Cheers cydewaze.

      I use Opera on a Linux netbook so I can take advantage of Turbo mode, built-in email, etc. It’s great and, despite the odd crash now and again, it’s ideal for that situation.

      Without wishing to start another flame war, I think Opera’s options and configuration are more confusing than Firefox, Chrome and Safari (although they’re better than IE). To be fair, Opera offers more features so you’d expect more complexity. I’ve discussed the issue before, but many Opera users love it and don’t want change — even if the browser would appeal to more users.

    • WinkyWolla

      @cydewaze

      You and Craig seem to enjoy hyperbolic statements. He has yet to explain how someone points out clear factual errors is a “fanatic” or “fundamentalist”, for example.

      Similarly, I don’t see any flamewars here. I see a debate which reveals a blogger who insists on making statements he knows are false.

      Trying to label others as “fanatics” and using similar tactics to stifle the debate is just disgusting.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        And these clear factual errors are? I stand by every comment and have provided URLs or data. How can you state I know they are false? If that’s not a fanatical statement…!

        Your proof comes from older performance tests, Opera’s marketing department, or something you supposedly read (on opera.com). Yet, despite an amazing claim that you’re unbiased, you’ve avoided answering three basic questions:

        1. Yes or no, does Opera have a lower market share than it’s four main competitors?

        2. Whether it’s true or not, why does Chrome have a reputation for being faster than Opera?

        3. Where is the research showing that browser sniffing rather than a lack of testing causes more Opera compatibility problems?

        Finally, does this thread look like the debate’s been stifled? If I didn’t want to discuss the issue, I’d never have raised it!

        The article was written because, in my opinion, Opera deserves more users. Bizarrely, the only ones offended by that notion are a handful of fanatical passionate Opera users!

      • WinkyWolla

        @Craig Buckler: “And these clear factual errors are?”

        Sigh. I have explained this to you repeatedly. For example, the false claim that Chrome is faster. I have shown you multiple tests that confirm that Opera is, in fact, generally faster.

        What “proof” from Opera’s marketing department are you talking about?

        I have not at all “avoided” any questions. In fact, I have answered them multiple times. But you continue to dishonestly repeat the questions I have already answered:

        1. It’s impossible to measure market share reliably, and regardless, the reported market share varies wildly depending on where you look. Opera is reportedly the #1 browser in countries like Ukraine, for example.

        2. Chrome does not have a reputation for being faster than Opera. Which is odd, considering that Google has infinitely more marketing and PR resources than Opera.

        3. You can find these explained in blogs run by Opera engineers at my.opera.com. I can’t be bothered to dig them up for you, since you have ignored all the links I have given you so far.

        You are attempting to undermine people’s arguments by calling them things like “fanatics.”

        What’s offensive about your posts is that they mindlessly repeat the same tired old lies about Opera. Lying about Opera isn’t helping.

      • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

        This is my last post on the matter…

        I have shown you multiple tests that confirm that Opera is, in fact, generally faster.

        “generally” is the key word. I’ve provided many showing Chrome is faster. I can show you some where IE is faster. In my opinion, Chrome has the edge — not by much — but very few people disagree with that notion.

        What “proof” from Opera’s marketing department are you talking about?

        Your claim that Opera’s reported 140m users == 7% market share. How is that more accurate than StatCounter?!

        I have not at all “avoided” any questions. In fact, I have answered them multiple times.

        So what’s your “I can’t be bothered to dig them up for you” quote about? Make bizarre claims if you like, but don’t put the onus on others to prove you wrong!

        It’s impossible to measure market share reliably … Opera is reportedly the #1 browser in countries like Ukraine

        And I bet 100% of people accessing your PC use Opera.

        Market share statistics are unreliable, but that’s no reason to completely reject them. Although you’re happy to accept IE’s share is dropping?

        You are attempting to undermine people’s arguments by calling them things like “fanatics.”

        So what would you call a person who cherry-picks stories, reports and statistics which agree with their view? Your URLs come from the same website and author!

        Lying about Opera isn’t helping.

        So stop doing it! Why can’t you accept that Opera deserves more users?

  • WinkyWolla

    Yet another test showing Opera with a clear performance lead over everyone else:

    http://www.betanews.com/article/Firefox-4-delayed-Is-it-ready-for-prime-time/1288364203

    But never mind the facts… Move along… Nothing to see here…

    • http://www.optimalworks.net/ Craig Buckler

      And here’s another!