Let the game come to you

I remember when Michael Jordan and Larry Bird were at their peak, people used to say that “the game came to them.”

They did less to get great results. Somehow they could read the court and respond to the situation, while also creating new situations.

I hope you are doing the same with your marketing. Having “the game come to you” in marketing means:

– Customers contact you, so you don’t have to chase them.

– You are known as the go-to professional in your marketplace.

– When you do reach out to prospects, they see your value and are happy to speak with you.

That’s the opposite of most marketing strategies, where you feel like you are working too hard for too little in the way of results.

How do you get the game to come to you?

– Get visible with educational and informational pieces (speeches, articles, research).

– Develop and nurture proactive referral networks and systems.

– Describe your business in ways that set you apart as having a specific edge (and have raving clients do the same on your behalf).

I like writing for Sitepoint because the range of reader experience is so broad. Some of you understand the above intellectually, but haven’t experienced it. Some of you already are the “go to” professional and know what it is like to have the game come to you. And others of you are in between, sometimes feeling like you are struggling and other times feeling like everything comes to you.

Another way to put it is the difference between push and pull. With push marketing, you feel like you are pushing against a wall. It gets tiring, fast. With pull marketing, you are attracting clients. Even when you use a “push” technique, like reaching out to a prospect with a phone call, you do it in such a way that the prospect wants to take you call, speak to you, and see if there is a fit or not.

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  • Jason Batten

    - Describe your business in ways that set you apart as having a specific edge (and have raving clients do the same on your behalf).

    I’m affraid of someone ‘stealing’ my approach. Has this happened to anyone?

  • aneitlich

    Jason,

    Unfortunately, strategy is not something you can patent or trademark. So you have to keep raising the bar. If your approach is good, people will “steal” it and — if it isn’t copyright or patent — there is nothing you can do but be better.

    For instance, I met with the top execs at Oracle once (during the late 1990s). They thought of strategy as a ladder, and always tried to be one rung ahead of the competition. They would anticipate where the competition would go to get up the ladder, and be sure to be one full rung above the competitors.

  • http://www.whitelionsoft.com veslach

    A friend of mine owns a small trucking company that is constantly coming up with new ways to do things. They started off by helping load/unload their own trucks (apparantly something very rare). Another issue is if any traffic issues come up, they immediately report back to the home office so they can re-route all the other trucks. He gets frustrated occassionally because everybody seems to have started copying him. However, he plans to continue to innovate & because of that he’s been staying ahead of everyone.

  • http://www.vitaleffect.com Gamermk

    - Customers contact you, so you don’t have to chase them.

    – You are known as the go-to professional in your marketplace.

    – When you do reach out to prospects, they see your value and are happy to speak with you.

    Points 1 and 3 are entired based on Point 2. Your whole marketing strategy really is just establishing Point 2 and everything just naturally falls into place from there.

    The key is choice really. When you seek business or approval from people (ie. push) they immediately respond by pulling away and putting up their guard. This obviously makes selling that much tougher. When you are the expert you create the impression that you know what you are doing, but more importantly you become the expert by using techniques like educational articles and seminars that do not seek their approval (money). This creates attraction. It leads to people going with your products sooner then they would otherwise need to and makes it so that you can charge twice as much as the combination becomes they don’t really want your product, they want you.

    Anyway I’m obviously sold on your approach. Nonethless, Point 1 and 3 are after thoughts, its all number 2.

  • http://www.vitaleffect.com Gamermk

    Competition not combination. Sorry for the dobule post would rather have edited the previous one.

  • shaq

    ooo man i love ur games i am like ur biggest fan i have every one of ur shoes but not the 20`s i need the m lol i watched ur show on opra and u had a womans clothing line and my mom loves it lol i play basketball for the scarbrought blues its an OBA i plan on making it to the NBA

  • nemanja_nq

    Anyway I’m obviously sold on your approach. Nonethless, Point 1 and 3 are after thoughts, its all number 2.

    I have to agree with him.
    But still nice post, Let the game come to you, or When the game come to you.

  • jomoweb

    I like the idea of these case studies, but most of them are the same business plan: A marketing site selling information to professionals.

    What if Sitepoint hosted an apprentice-type competition where Sitepoint users could create a business plan and develop it over 1 year?

    We could see a culmination of business plans and assess which ones really went well at the end of the year. It could also serve as motivation for those of us who are trying to “work hard in 2006″ to work even harder. The competitive spirit usually brings that out in people.

    Would anybody be up for this? Perhaps Sitepoint might be willing to donate a prize package of books for the grand prize.