Is It Time to Ditch IE6?

On August 27, 2001, almost exactly 7 years ago, Microsoft unleashed Internet Explore 6 upon the world. Despite version 7 having been out now for almost two years, and version 8 already in public beta, usage of the 2001 release remains strong. W3Counter reports that it is still the most popular browser in the world at 34.6% of all visits, while TheCounter.com has it second to IE7, but only barely and still commanding a whopping 36% market share.

Because so many people still use the older version of Internet Explorer, many web sites have made the choice to continue supporting it (including SitePoint — where about 12% of our visitors still come to us using IE6). But is it perhaps time to ditch IE6 support and start forcing people to upgrade?

Web application developer 37signals made the decision to drop IE6 support in July (actual support for Microsoft’s last generation browser ceased on August 15). “IE 6 can’t provide the same web experience that modern browsers can,” wrote 37signals of the decision. “Continued support of IE 6 means that we can’t optimize our interfaces or provide an enhanced customer experience in our apps. Supporting IE 6 means slower progress, less progress, and, in some places, no progress.”

According to 37signals, supporting IE6 was holding them back. And 37signals isn’t alone in their dislike of IE6. In 2006, a few months before Microsoft released their last major browser, PC World magazine ranked Internet Explorer 6 as the 8th worst tech product of all time, citing its terrible track record when it comes to security.

Security is such a big issue for IE6, that one blogger recently reported that 95% of all bots accessing his site use Internet Explorer 6 as their user-agent. “Most blog spam comes from bots that either fake or, as a trojan, use Internet Explorer 6 of infected systems,” he wrote, ultimately deciding to block IE6 completely to alleviate the blog spam problem.

Of course, security isn’t the only reason web developers are sour on IE6. Internet Explorer 6 is also dismal when it comes to standards compliance. So why do people continue to use it? As Nick La wrote a year ago, the reason people still use IE6 is that developers go out of their way to make web sites work in it. So most people don’t realize that IE6 isn’t a good browser.

“We all know that IE6 is outdated and has horrible CSS rendering engine. However, most average Internet users haven’t realized that yet. Why? Because we put our hard work on it and patch the bugs by various IE hacks,” La wrote, urging people to drop support for IE6.

A third of the Internet is a lot of people to just leave behind, though. So support for IE6 continues at most web sites, especially large ones. What we need to move us forward, however, is a bold move, not too much unlike the one Apple made in 2001 when it decided to forgo backwards compatibility when it released OS X. In order to save the Internet from IE6, perhaps we need to stop supporting it.

What do you think? Should web developers stop supporting Internet Explorer 6? Vote in our poll and then leave your thoughts in the comments below.

[poll id=4]

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  • Jean-Nicolas

    I have made some Web Sites and Web application where I just don’t support IE6 at all. Some of my site have bugs I just leave the bugs, because its just to much time to clear those bugs. And yes we should force people to use Firefox, opera or Safari because IE has proven to be a browsers that is way behind the rest of browsers its like Firefox 3 is 15 years a head from IE. Even IE 8 is fare behind Firefox, just look at the acid 3 test. Look at the HTML5 support and css 3 support. Firefox community are already working on version 3.1 that will support ogg , and some css 3 properties.

    Sorry but IE your just to far behind the game and you not has stable and fast has Firefox and the other browsers.

  • ikeo

    well … thats pretty unanimous.

  • Paul Annesley

    100% so far – looking good :)

    I’ve submitted the post to Digg – give it some Digg loving to bring in some more voters :)

    http://digg.com/software/Is_It_Time_to_Ditch_IE6_Vote_at_SitePoint

  • http://www.studio-gecko.com/ XLCowBoy

    A major question here is – are those that fall under the “third of Internet users” category the same users that convert? If they convert, then isn’t it of even greater importance that we force them to upgrade, lest they are traumatized by a security issue caused by their use of IE6, such as a hacked credit card?

    In my oh-so-humble opinion, we aren’t exactly doing our jobs as best we can by patronizing IE6. The thought of “what’s wrong? every thing {looks} fine on my IE6″ can bring great trouble to said user.

    Forcing users to upgrade is the only way to “kill” IE6, and save everyone from web developers, to those users who are unwittingly becoming victims and hosts of security attacks.

    Hence, this poll receives a “Yes” vote from me.

  • http://www.afterlight.net.au AussieJohn

    IE6 is the bane of my existence – and I’m sure many other front-end web developers. I vote Yes! Die IE6! DIE!

  • http://www.pixel-house.com.au justin-gray

    Whilst there is still a large percentage of users browsing using ie6, you can’t just decide to just “drop IE6 support”. What are you going to say to your clients when they find out you are turning away 35% of their visitors? I hate ie6 as much as the next person, but dropping complete support for ie6 at this point in time is not realistic whatsoever.

  • Ian

    What are you going to say to your clients when they find out you are turning away 35% of their visitors?

    Couldn’t have said it better myself.

    I’d like to know how many of those who voted ‘yes’ are actually going to drop support for IE 6.

    One option would be to provide IE 6 support as a paid option for new clients. This way, it’s up to the client to decide whether they deem it necessary.

  • http://www.dangrossman.info Dan Grossman

    Haven’t found it hard to support at all, so I do test sites in IE6 still.

  • http://www.studio-gecko.com/ XLCowBoy

    Did anyone else bother to read the blog wherein the author found out that only 2% of his IE6 traffic must be coming from actual people, and the rest are actually bots?

    Am I the only one that sees the significance of that? Imagine if 90% of that 36% market share are actually just bots and infected PC’s?

    P.S. I agree with Ian – a paid option sounds good.

  • http://www.ilija.biz/ Ilija Studen

    Although I think that IE6 should go away and make place for better browsers, we will not drop support for IE6 until IE6 usage drops bellow 5%.

    People use our software to interact with their clients. Our software being broken in borwsers their clients use simply makes our customers look bad. Do you really want that for your customers? A couple of hours of extra work to make everything work is not that difficult.

    If you want to create a successful business you should be prepared to go an extra mile for your clients / customers. Bill them for the extra work done, but don’t make them look bad. IE6 will eventually go away by itself.

  • locomotivate

    I still make sure my websites work in IE6, but I the experience its users get is less than what they would had their browser been something more acceptable.

    I can’t imagine how much money has been spent to make websites work in IE6.

  • Manolis

    As Nick La wrote a year ago, the reason people still use IE6 is that developers go out of their way to make web sites work in it. So most people don’t realize that IE6 isn’t a good browser.

    A helluva lot of people don’t even know what a web browser is, and you reckon the reason they use IE6 is because sites are rendering correctly in them?

    The only way people are going to stop using IE6 is when no operating system has it as their default browser, and if a site does not work using IE6, they’ll stop visiting the site much sooner than they will upgrade their browser. And let’s not forget that many people are not using legit versions of Windows anyway, which makes upgrading to IE7 impossible for inexpert users (sure, they can upgrade to any of the other browsers on the market, but the chances that people still using IE6 know that Firefox, Opera, Safari and the like exist are very slim.)

    And I can confirm that IE6 is the default browser on the standard operating environments at GE Money and Telstra.

  • DopeCho

    if a user wants to play a new game he needs to install new version of directx
    if a user wants to open new type of file /i.e. .dox/ he needs a new version of m$ office
    but when it comes to website – it has to be compatible with old buggy versions of browsers…
    WTF?!

  • Biju

    Drop and use IE 7 or IE 8 Beta 1

  • Rick Mans

    Why use a piece of software that is 7 years old? That is really pre historic (and IE6 acts like a prehistoric thing). Is anyone using Netscape 6 (the horror!), mozilla 1.0, opera7.0?, firefox 0.5 or safari 1.0. Probably not, because all these browsers released already new versions (or died -> Netscape).

    Due the fact microsoft did not release upgrades often (after five years) people keep using IE6. Also the fact that the upgrade to IE7 required at first a WGA check was not really promoting upgrading. And as a last issue due to the horrific html and css rendering of IE6 some pages does not look pretty in IE7. Therefore some companies won’t upgrade since they would break their intranet of other webapplications with an upgrade.

  • TJS

    “including SitePoint — where about 12% of our visitors still come to us using IE6″

    Guess that explains the 12% who responded ‘no’ to the poll. Seriously, switch browsers, folks. It’s not hard. Using IE6 is the equivalent of wearing a 70s leisure suite in public: it’s old and it was never a good idea.

  • http://www.whatstyle.net Ize

    I’m all in favour of dropping support, but as said above, it’s not yet a realistic decision.
    Clients will never allow us.

    Maybe we should go back to the 90’s where sites were littered with “optimised for ” taglines. :-)
    Maybe going out of our way to provide extra features on browsers that support modern methods helps persuading people to upgrade/switch browsers.

    But dropping support is alas not yet a viable option.

  • gtsiamalos

    As everything in the WWW, this really depends on many factors. A client of mine runs a website with 50.000 uniques a month and 65% visit through IE6. They are people between 45 – 55 in age and most of them have old computers with CRT screens. Should he tell his visitors to throw away their crappy computers and buy new ones with modern browsers? I don’t think so.

  • Reggie Drake

    When it comes to CSS issues, I usually just give IE6 users some simple fall-back layout, whereas users of real browsers get the ‘nice’ layout.

  • Steve

    Who are those IE6 users anyway? – Individuals who know nothing about computers?

    Modernised youngsters and developers all have at least IE7. Why? One youngster upgrades sees benefits and then gets his friend to upgrade in front of him.

    IE 6 is old and so are the users browsing with it.

  • Jdawg2k

    I make a note to test in IE6 post-development. Only because so many still use it. I’m highly considering dropping that step all together because the support for that browser has been bothersome for too dang long.

  • YuriKolovsky

    if we do drop support, which i think will happen soon enough, then we will get rid of IE6, imagine that!!
    for now we should write tons of functions to our website and put tags for IE6 users, “to upgrade”, with reasons, links and instructions on how to.

    but until we explain our users that they are using “the worst” Internet browser there is, they are not going to do anything.

    and most people, even with good PC’s still use IE6, because they don’t know anything about them.

    P.S. firefox works ‘fine’ on super old machines, with huge screens, and PCI graphics cards

  • kant

    One has to wonder why IT departments are not upgrading browsers? Teck sites are the exception, I have one UK NHS site that has 42% IE6.

    IT departments are the ones to blame, they make the decisions for most people, and they seem to have a poor opinion of IE7. There seems to be some prevailing notion that IE7 is not an improvement on IE6. One opinion I heard recently; was that IE7 was very slow. But I think the real issue is that a lot of people simply don’t like the UI.

    I believe Internet Explorer 7 made a major mistake when it changed the UI – If IE7 still looked the same as IE6, I think the upgrade process would have proceeded at a much faster pace.

  • http://pelicansareevil.com Bling

    It’s nice in theory…. but until Google & Yahoo drop support for IE6, we’re going to see continued use of IE6.

  • JLab

    I would love to stop supporting IE6, I think ask anyone and they would agree. I’d like to know wouldn’t? Oh wait I do, my company and quite a number of others…

    I have worked for or know people who have worked for many Fortune 500 companies. The bane of our existence is the constant argument by IT management that we only need to SUPPORT IE6. Because in theory that is the official company browser for internal applications and sites, or it is the only official one support the said company for outside clients.

    Fortunately there has never been anyone who said you can support other browsers on your own. So that is what I and other have been doing. And more recently some clients are starting to use other OS’s like Mac or Linux.

    I think corporate IT had such headaches with IE6, and now that they have it “stable” they don’t want to push for change. Especially with all the issues of Vista these days. It becomes why change? There is now good return on investment for it in their eyes…

    I wonder how much corporations market share count?

  • C. Burnett

    My perspective is simple — perhaps too simple — but it’s how I make the decision.

    I remember that not only am I working for my client, but I’m working for their clients or prospective clients (visitors). I need to adjust to their needs, not the other way ’round. I’m the one getting paid for it.

    Yes, it does take longer to support IE6 — adds about 10-15% to total front-end time — so I just include it in the price.

    If competitors skip the IE6 step and bid lower, it’s up to me to explain, and my client to understand that you pay for what you get. If the client doesn’t see it that way — that’s fine — I don’t get offended. Nor do I back off from what is the quality standard I offer for my clients — a site that functions on a wide variety of currently used software (and hardware; including hand-held devices). There are plenty of clients out there, and I’d be foolish to think I’m a match for all of them.

    BTW — I only stopped supporting IE5.5 (PC) a year ago. It’s been a relief to leave that mess behind.

  • asbjornu

    I don’t think this is about giving IE6 users the finger and an error message instead of a half-working website. It’s about not going the extra hundred miles it takes to provide IE6 users with a stellar experience. The site will still mostly work, but alpha-transparent PNG’s won’t look good and lots of CSS will be ignored or wrongly interpreted. All of the content and most of the functionality is still there, though. And in that case I think it’s completely okay to not stretch for full IE6 compatibility.

  • http://www.clearwind.nl peach

    should we: yes of course
    will I: no of course not, let other people loose this market share before people start updating faster.

    This is probably the thought of most website developers.

  • Laura K

    I think you should support IE6 depending on the project. If your site is (like Sitepoint) used by mostly tech-savvy people, then dropping support for IE6 is a safe option. If you are doing a family site for users who are still running Windows 98, then dropping support for IE6 would be suicidal.

    Sitepoint should drop IE6- especially if it allows you to spend more time on more interesting features for the site. (How long do front end developers spend trying to make sites ‘work’ in IE6!?!)

  • J Lane

    There’s different levels of “support”.

    With a site I’m working on now, it works in IE6 (the forms behave as expected, the menus function), but there are a couple of layout issues on some of the pages where things don’t line up perfectly.

    Will I take the time to fix those issues? It’s not high on my list of priorities. Everything is still readable, and the content is accessible.

  • curtismchale

    There should be a maybe option in the poll. The reality is that if your users are using IE 6 then you need to support it. I would drop it in a heartbeat if my users were less then 5%. I will also drop it when microsoft stop’s supporting it which could be soon since microsoft has had a practice of only supporting the lastest two versions of IE.

  • Chris Pratt

    “Dropping” IE6 support is not really that detrimental. Refusing to support IE6 does not mean that IE6 users can no longer go to the website; it only means that the site might not look as it should to those users. The page is still there, with all of its content. If the discrepancies in the visual layout are terribly annoying, then they can upgrade, or even simply turn off styles and just browse the web as straight text and images.

    This is not about denying access; it’s about refusing to take extra measures to ensure a seamless user experience for IE6 users. Nick La is right. As long as we continue to ensure that everything looks perfect in IE6, then people will continue to use IE6. It is only when things start to “break” that they will finally seek a remedy in an upgrade or a new browser.

  • Tarh

    Should we drop support for IE6? Yes.
    Can we drop support for IE6? No.

  • Buzz

    Dropping support for IE6 is one of the most liberating decisions I made in recent months. By consciously deciding to focus on standards, I am able to create solid XHTML 1.0 Strict pages that load quickly and work beautifully. Part of the reason that people still use IE6 is that we, the web development community, accommodate them far too much! In my newer sites, I add a script that runs in IE6; it alerts the user that the site simply DOES NOT FUNCTION under IE6 and that the user should either upgrade to IE7 or switch Firefox, Opera, or Safari. This way, users receive the message very clearly! MY sites still let them in, but all my menus and whatnot are broken and ugly.

    Older popular sites obviously have some commitment to maintaining IE6 visitors, but newer ones should feel no guilt in telling people to get with the program! It’s 2008! If we’re going to support IE6 in every new web project, why aren’t we still supporting DOS applications?

  • randywehrs

    YOUR BROWSER IS 7 YEARS OLD, AND POSES A SECURITY RISK TO YOU AND YOUR MACHINE! This website does not display properly because you are TOO LAZY TO UPDATE! Please download IE7 immediately. It’s free. Gees…

    Notice the same percentage of people that voted NOT to drop IE6 support is almost exactly the same percentage of people who still visit Sitepoint with IE6? Upgrade already people!

  • randywehrs

    YOUR BROWSER IS 7 YEARS OLD, AND POSES A SECURITY RISK TO YOU AND YOUR MACHINE! This website does not display properly because you are TOO LAZY TO UPDATE! Please download IE7 immediately. It’s free. Gees…

    Darn, it didn’t display my conditional comment.. That first paragraph above was supposed to be in an IE6 conditional comment.

    From what I can remember, iGoogle uses this by the way.. It isn’t as harsh as mine though.

  • http://www.onexsquare.com Teraflops

    Imagine turning away IE6 users from your site, or forcing them to upgrade to a new browser. This reminds about 5 years ago where many websites had splash pages that announced the site requirements.


    Stopie6.org
    have a campaign that supports the elimination of IE6 .

  • Edan

    New projects can’t afford lacking IE6 support for obvious reasons. Old websites, however, should definitely drop IE6 support as in some point users will have to switch to a modern browser.

  • Corporate IE6 User

    Our corporation forces IE6.

    I’d really like to kick it to the curb, but Mr. Corporation always wins…

    Signed..
    Unhappy Corporate IE6 user

  • dougoftheabaci

    Just a quick note, I’ve stopped IE6 support already myself. It’s something I tell any client I have. Usually I’ll say, “Anyone with IE6 who browses your website can get around, but the site won’t look as good and they won’t have all the functionality of people with a current browser.” I now only support it when I’m working in areas that IE6 has a majority.

    In my case what triggered this was Apple saying they were dropping it for MobileMe. That, when combined with companies like 37signals, I saw no real reason to hold onto outdated tech.

    But what I want to know is am I the only one who thinks that IE6 isn’t the only problem? IE7 is still a pathetic browser by any measure and specifically when you look at Acid2 and 3 tests. IE8 may barely pass A2T but it barely registers on A3T!

    Microsoft needs to get it’s act together on the web. I can’t think of a single thing they’ve released for the web that has actually had the web community going, “Good job Microsoft!”

  • Murphy

    No, it’s too early yet.

    I’ve watched the trend of IE6 usage dropping on my sites, and with the rate it’s going I won’t be able to drop support for it completely until the end of 2009.

  • http://www.iraqtimeline.com/ Black Max

    I hate IE6. You hate IE6. That’s a given. But the flip side of this is, millions–yes, millions–of users are using IE with no other options. At work, at church, at Internet cafes, in libraries, thousands of places where people have to work with the computers they have. And plenty of other people could use FF, Opera, whatever, but they don’t. IE6 came with their XP machine out of the box and that’s what they’re using, period the end. They don’t know how to install a different browser, they are scared to try, or they use their computers for specific functions and they don’t give a hoot what browser they use, as long as the site comes up when they click into it.

    This is a reiteration of every argument about browsers since, what, Mosaic and Netscape? (Remember coding for NS4?) In every case, we’ve had to be patient until the ugly old browser’s user pool shrunk due to attrition and time. We’re not going to force users to stop using IE by refusing to support their browsers, though we will force users to stop using our sites. The only reasonable alternative we have is to grit our teeth and wait it out, just like we’ve done so many times before.

  • keith5885

    Stopie6.org have a campaign that supports the elimination of IE6 .

    That site’s script didn’t work for me. Anyone with any good alert IE6 users to upgrade scripts?

  • http://altoonadesign.com halfasleeps

    can’t microsoft just do a force update to make ie6 users upgrade to 7? kinda like they did for the “click to active”

  • automatic_ab

    “Whilst there is still a large percentage of users browsing using ie6, you can’t just decide to just “drop IE6 support”. What are you going to say to your clients when they find out you are turning away 35% of their visitors? I hate ie6 as much as the next person, but dropping complete support for ie6 at this point in time is not realistic whatsoever.”

    Educate your clients on why continuing IE6 support is a bad idea. Then educate them on how educating the visitors will create a broader market share and a more quality user experience. You have to be able to convince your clients that something is a good idea; then have logistics to back it up. They’re not always going to want to change things, e.g., if it ain’t broke…You have to be able to convince them that “it” is broke and dropping support and forcing an upgrade will be beneficial for both client/user. I mean, really, it’s almost 2010 and IE6 is still alive. Developers should be setting the pace for clients/users, not vice versa.

  • dougoftheabaci

    can’t microsoft just do a force update to make ie6 users upgrade to 7? kinda like they did for the “click to active”

    The problem is there are companies that require IE6 to work. Their web-based applications or intranets and such were built for IE6 and will break if upgraded. So instead of upgrading they make everyone continue to use IE6 since it’s cheaper in the short term.

    You’ll find that the majority of IE6 users are actually in academic, medical, and business demographics. And when it’s business related it’s usually because of some sort of compatibility issue.

    Remember, children: IE7 sucks, just not as bad as IE6.

  • Lockjaw

    I’d like to drop support for IE6. I’d really like to.

    But I’ve got a bit of a conundrum. My application caters to the ease-of-use crowd and, frankly, though any other browser offers an easier and better experience, *forcing* my users to download and install a new browser, no matter how much of an improvement it offers, is simply contrary to that ease-of-use requirement. I can encourage them, I can sell, I can plead. But force? I’ll lose users. Not willing to do that.

    And I harbor a white-hot hatred of IE6. I despise the browser. I’ve cursed its makers and I’ve cursed their children. But I have a number of users who are (typically, but not always) in the forties or fifties, or older, and who can find fairly easy Internet tasks to be a hassle. They usually sound something like this: “I have to download a new Internet software? Now which is my browser? Is the window my browser or is it the place where I type the address?” Understand, too, that these people are *not* stupid. Assigning that category is a quick way to dismiss their concerns, but these are people who are, some of them, intelligent professionals, executives, analytical thinkers. But they’re not very Internet savvy, nor are they hugely receptive to any education which makes them feel less-than or takes up too much of their expensive time.

    So therein lies a huge problem. IE6 _will_ go away, there’s no doubt. Systems get replaced, people get forced in to new software through circumstances of hardware failure and replacement or new, shiny purchases. But no one likes to be forced into anything, and when you’re asking for subscription dollars it’s a dicey proposition to tell your customers that, oh, by the way, in addition to money they also need to do some uncomfortable (for some of them) software installations.

  • TomTom

    As a developer, I hate IE6.

    But from the view point of non-techie users (which I know quite a few), why should I upgrade?

    Microsoft could solve the problem completely by allowing multiple versions of IE on the same computer. Then, they could still have the warm fuzzy felling of having their old browser and still play with the new version and warm up to it.

  • dougoftheabaci

    Sorry for the double-post.

    @Automatic_AB:
    I agree totally. The best way, I find, to convince clients that IE6 isn’t something they should concern themselves with is to say something along the lines of the following:

    “Firstly, while if you look at pure numbers IE6 might look like a big contender, in your demographic it’s not. Beyond that, by dropping direct support for IE6 it doesn’t mean that someone browsing with IE6 won’t be able to see the site or move around it. It just means that the site might not look perfect or that they might not get that added bit of functionality that I’ll be adding. In the end by dropping direct support for IE6 I can create, for you, a better website that’s more user-friendly in less time and for less money. The only downside is that some of the sexier parts of the site might not be fully accessible to someone with that outdated of a browser.”

  • http://www.ltheobald.co.uk Leesy

    For my personal projects, I don’t cater for IE 6 any more for all the reasons stated.

    But for my professional work, it’s a different story. The company I work for do a lot of work for the local councils here in the UK. Our councils seem to be famous for having IT departments that are very unwilling to change. We have to support IE6 as it’s all our customers are able to use – even if they don’t want to. So unless those local councils are given the time and possibly finances to update their IT systems, I know I’ll be stuck developing for that lame excuse of a browser :)

  • randywehrs

    Kieth5885:

    Anyone with any good alert IE6 users to upgrade scripts?

    Simple html conditional comment. I hope it displays properly:



    You are using IE 6.

  • randywehrs

    Sorry for so many posts! I don’t know how to get this code to display! One last try…



    You are using IE 6.

    or go here.. http://www.quirksmode.org/css/condcom.html

  • Jack Matier

    Having just recently been involved in a site to support IE5, 5.5, 6 and 7 (as well as the compliant browsers of course) I can see the eagerness to drop a browser version… and of course so much of this comes down to your target market, I normally don’t go less than IE6.

    ————-
    In my case, in serving lower income families, there are a lot of people who are just impressed that they themselves got *on* a computer *and* the internet (who’s computer is outdated, and who has IE6 or less), GO THEM! WOO! I’m already happy as the next techie.

    Being near poverty means there is no geek to educate you, and even if there is, well, I’m not sure my focus would be on the discrepancies of browsers, and I’m not sure I would just install Firefox and say “It’s an upgrade to your internet” (though I have done that in a few cases)… this is so even as much as I rant positively about standards in everyday life and how it can enhance our interaction of it. Of course, again, all this is dependent on the person. But I’m usually too busy explaining how things in general work, what email is, searching, and sites that might pertain to their interest, etc. Maybe in another session.

    Other people, as mentioned by Black Max simply have no other option. The surrey public library system and our bank kiosks all use IE6, much to my dismay as I start in a panic. It’s now weird of me to not use Firefox, Safari or Opera. It’s a Different environment. But I adapt quickly. For others it’s a bit more traumatizing.
    ———————

    So all we can do to induce browser adoption without hindering those in the position of only being able to use IE X < what they should be using, short of forming a coalition where 95% of developers join in and follow (which as a community as a whole are not ready for)… are these things:

    1. Use standards and degrade peacefully like how a person tries to develop normally.
    2. Go out of our way to find nice new standards and use those to enhance the experience.
    3. Wait.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, please put it in a box, burn it, and bury the ashes.

  • Compumaniac12

    “PC World magazine ranked Internet Explorer 6 as the 8th worst tech product of all time, citing its terrible track record when it comes to security.”

    i love pc world…

    My opinion on the matter is, that everyone is capable of upgrading whether they know it or not. Even my grandmother runs the automatic updates on her pc and therefore no longer has IE6. I use it briefly when installing XP and thats about it.

    Having done plenty of CSS things… transparent images, theres an extensive list of problems with IE6, its CTD’s with a lot of codes, just really a mess to deal with and if it wasn’t for it i would probably have made a lot more money in my time.

    So im going to have to go ahead and say that IE6 users should be left behind, its not like the sites don’t function in IE6, they just dont function or look perfect. Sure some tech support places with get questions but the answers simple, Microsoft has put it all over the automatic updates, you have to get ie7 with anything now, especially SP2 things that seem to be all over the place as well…

    Its time to move on.

  • http://altoonadesign.com halfasleeps

    OFF TOPIC

    “PC World magazine ranked Internet Explorer 6 as the 8th worst tech product of all time, citing its terrible track record when it comes to security.”

    Where can I view this at? …im interested in what the other 7 were.

  • http://triunedesigns.com leoschmidt08

    I do not think we should completely ditch support for IE6. Personally, I cannot stand IE6 and will be happy when I no longer have to worry about the monstrosity; however, I am looking at this from a tech-savvy web programmer’s perspective. A lot of people outside of my programming circle do not know that IE7 (or even better browsers like Firefox, Opera, etc.) exist. What is more, they really do not care. As long as they can get on the Internet, check their email, do a few extra things they are just fine. I cannot see them switching to IE7 because of the lack of support, they probably will just not come back to that specific website.

    Another reason I will not forgo IE6 support is because some people do not have a choice. People who work for companies with IT oftentimes cannot get IE7 or another browser because IT is slow to respond with those types of updates. It is not the end-user’s fault that they cannot get IE7+, it is their employers. I do not want to punish the end-user for something that is out of their control.

  • http://triunedesigns.com leoschmidt08

    halfasleeps – I think the link was in the article above, but here it is:

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/125772-3/the_25_worst_tech_products_of_all_time.html

  • http://www.cemerson.co.uk Stormrider

    I think yes… but not yet. Maybe in a year or so, after IE8s release, would be the time.

  • http://www.iraqtimeline.com/ Black Max

    Maybe in a year or so, after IE8s release, would be the time.

    How many think IE8 will s*ck as well? Raise your hands….

  • MikesBarto2002

    Has anybody mentioned that the reason that people still use IE6 may be because they don’t know any better? That these people <em>barely</em> know how to use their computer, and upgrading IE6, not to mention ANYTHING on their computer, might be out of their league? Maybe it is a teaching problem; these people have not been taught how to, so they don’t know any better.

    Which is why I vote to lose support for it. Obviously the majority of people left that use IE6 are hackers and the computer illiterate.

  • http://charlessweeney.com Charles Sweeney

    Black Max says it all, rather well.

    Most of my sites are low graphic and use very basic HTML (with a minimum of CSS styling) so I don’t have problems supporting browsers, from ancient to new. This I should say is very deliberate on my part.

    A lot of the debate here is about “forcing” people to change. The last thing I would do with a customer/visitor is “force” them to do anything.

  • dougoftheabaci

    @MikesBarto2002: I’m not so sure that’s as common as you think. Microsoft has pushed pretty hard to get people to upgrade to IE7. As previously stated it’s default for SP2 and SP3 So anyone with an even remotely up-to-date OS is going to have it. Now someone who uses Windows regularly can correct me but isn’t it getting to be mandatory in some ways, having IE7?

    To the best of my knowledge the people who still use IE6 tend to be those individuals who have been either been told not to upgrade or have otherwise chosen not to.

  • Paul Annesley

    I’d like to know how many of those who voted ‘yes’ are actually going to drop support for IE 6.

    The question is ‘should we …?’ not ‘will you …?’. The difference is significant. Currently, a website that drops IE6 support will just appear broken to users of IE6. But if there’s a critical-mass movement to drop IE6 support across a significant percentage of the web, the impact will shift to those left using IE6.

    There’s organizations and non-tech-savvy users that’ll use IE6 until it either stops working or starts costing them money. And it’ll only stop working when we collectively drop support.

  • Paul Annesley

    How many think IE8 will s*ck as well? Raise your hands…

    I think IE8 is looking very promising, especially compared to IE6 and IE7. IE-hating for the sake of it isn’t going to get us anywhere.

    That said… die IE :)

  • winterheat

    usually i am ok with it… but since making pages work on IE 6 means I have less time for dinner and not much time for doing laundry any more, i’d say we’d better stop supporting it.

  • JdL

    I didn’t even read the post. Absolutely yes. No questions, no explanations, nothing else needed. It’s not about backward compatibility or anything. It’s about building applications that WORK. Period. IE6 can’t do it. Not without that extra 20% of effort costing the same as the entire project.

  • http://www.iraqtimeline.com/ Black Max

    “Has anybody mentioned that the reason that people still use IE6 may be because they don’t know any better? … Maybe it is a teaching problem; these people have not been taught how to, so they don’t know any better. … Obviously the majority of people left that use IE6 are hackers and the computer illiterate.”

    Nothing personal, but the contempt for the non-technical user just steams off this statement.

    You have to remember, many people look at a computer in the same way they look at a hammer or a television remote. They don’t care how it works as long as they can use it to get what they logged on for–be it balancing their checkbook, IM’ing their mom, writing a novel, or looking at porn. We don’t look at computers, and certainly not browsers, in that fashion, but we are in the minority. A very small minority. This is the same kind of designer-centric approach that leads to Web sites with intensely confusing navigation schemes and lots of documentation that basically says, “This is how you will use this site. If it doesn’t make any sense to you, then it’s your fault because you are an idiot and the angels sing when I code.”

    As designers, we are here to serve users. We can educate them, prod and chivvy them into switching to more standards-compliant browsers, or anything along those lines, but we are primarily here to create sites that present content in a usable, appealing fashion. It’s their choice whether to use Firefox or Opera or IE or Lynx or their vintage copy of Mosaic. Once we lose site of it, we begin to see the user as “beneath” us, taking what we deign to give them while we expect them to be grateful.

    This mindset cannot stand.

  • Unit7285

    When I produce a website for a client, they expect it to work satisfactorily in the browsers used by their potential customers. They absolutely do not want people phoning up or emailing and complaining that the website doesn’t work. When people complain the site is not working the client thinks ‘The web designer has messed up, the website is broken and we’re losing business’, not ‘Oh, that potential customer is probably using an old browser, so we don’t want to do business with them.’

    For that reason it’s essential that their website works properly in IE6, as it’s still used by many people. Why people still use this terrible browser is a mystery but they do, and that’s something commercial website developers have to live with.

    It’s not my job, or my client’s, to chivvy people into upgrading their browsers. There’s nothing worse than a busy-body website that starts telling you what browser to use, or what plugins, when all you’ve come there to look at is a company’s products and services.

    All my websites are built for commercial clients, and all the clients want to do is sell their products and services. No distractions. No side issues. No errors. Sell, sell, sell. I cannot think of a single one who would even consider voluntarily turning away a significant percentage of their visitors for no discernible advantage.

    If you run your own website, or if the website is ‘non-commerical’, then I guess it’s fine to try and encourage users to use a modern browser and dump useless IE6. But it’s not a sensible option if you produce commercial websites for paying clients.

  • winterheat

    there is way to easily add support for IE 6, and that is

  • winterheat

    the php code is stripped out in my last comment…

    just test in PHP or using Javascript, if browser is IE 6 or earlier, display the message “this browser is too weak to display the page. please upgrade.” and exit().

  • http://www.afterlight.net.au AussieJohn

    @Black Max:
    In principal I agree with what you’re saying that we should design sites for the benefit of users and allow for easy usage of the website – this of course is talking about the design and functionality of the website – not the level of support that we provide.

    It’s their choice whether to use Firefox or Opera or IE or Lynx or their vintage copy of Mosaic.

    Supporting IE6 would be like allowing horse drawn carts or vintage steam cars on the freeway. Sure, they will work just fine, but they are slow, featureless and insecure compared to modern cars (i.e. modern browsers).

    I work for a digital agency and for new websites we tell our clients that we will only have acceptable functionality/design for Internet Explorer 6. Once the percentages of usage drop low enough – we will only provide basic support for IE6 (where the only basic requirement will be that the users can access the site and all the content).

  • orokusaki

    I’ve yet to this date ever built a hack for IE6 and every site I’ve ever built works in IE6. Yes, I have to make adjustments, but they’re not hacks. It’s simple, I use floats, and I avoid the following:

    Double margin float bug

    Expanding box issues

    Using pseudo classes on arbitrary elements

    and everything works fine.

    checkout:

    http://bikini-wholesale.com

    http://airsocom.com/z/procerin/

    just to name a couple, and try to find a hack, or an incompatibility.

    You also might note that every page is XHTML 1.0 Strict.

  • Jack Matier

    Black Max

    …we are in the minority. A very small minority. This is the same kind of designer-centric approach that leads to Web sites with intensely confusing navigation schemes and lots of documentation that basically says, “This is how you will use this site. If it doesn’t make any sense to you, then it’s your fault because you are an idiot and the angels sing when I code.”

    Exactly.

    Supporting IE6 would be like allowing horse drawn carts or vintage steam cars on the freeway. Sure, they will work just fine, but they are slow, featureless and insecure compared to modern cars (i.e. modern browsers).

    It’s not just that, but we’re developing the highway to allow for horse drawn carriages AS WELL as modern cars, which complicates things and has the side effect of removed features or larger expenses.. or both.

    A while back there used to be sites that would essentially say “This site is best viewed with”, and this my way or the highway seems to be the same mantra we’re getting into again today, particularly in the web application arena. Only instead of Internet Explorer or Netscape we have Standards and Internet Explorer. Reading the posts here I can’t help but to feel we’re wanting to be really harsh on the users in this aspect. How is intentionally making someone suffer going to make anyone feel good? And it’s certainly not professional. It disgusts me.

    There has to be a better way of going about this.

    In every industry there are standards and reasons for following them (correctly), and it seems very clear that (at least the people responding to this blog) want to move forward, yet there are a lot of us that seem to have to bend backward into some overstretched limbo at the same time for various reasons. But from what I’ve seen, people, just, don’t, get, (not just web) standards. Do you see where I’m going with this?

    Punishing users isn’t a professional option.

    I don’t think I would mind a more or less discreet education campaign on (not just web) standards and how they pertain to every walk of life. Maybe I’m taking this a little bit too much down a tangent and missing the point beyond the ditch IE6 part of everything.

    There are campaigns, one that I can think of the address:
    http://www.webstandards.org/action/previous-campaigns/buc/upgrade/

    and a nice detailed wikibook:
    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/FOSS_Open_Standards/Importance_and_Benefits_of_Open_Standards#Particular_Benefits_of_Open_Standards

  • http://www.iraqtimeline.com/ Black Max

    there is way to easily add support for IE 6, and that is … just test in PHP or using Javascript, if browser is IE 6 or earlier, display the message “this browser is too weak to display the page. please upgrade.” and exit().

    Yep. I would indeed exit that site and never, ever visit it again. If I had hired you to design a site for my firm, I’d fire you and ensure you never worked for my firm again. This approach is the worst kind of elitism.

    Punishing users isn’t a professional option.

    Absolutely. We talk a lot about Web standards, but some of the comments on this thread prove to me that there are plenty of Web designers out there who have little use for professional standards.

  • http://www.iraqtimeline.com/ Black Max

    If I had hired you to design a site for my firm,

    The passage should read “that site.” Grrr.

  • Anthony Gallon

    Microsoft should stop making browsers, they just can’t handle it. Same could be said for Outlook. Why MS continues to give us sh**y products is their secret, why we should put up with it is a mystery to me.

  • winterheat

    Yep. I would indeed exit that site and never, ever visit it again. If I had hired you to design a site for my firm, I’d fire you and ensure you never worked for my firm again. This approach is the worst kind of elitism.

    my comment was supposed to be just joking. your comment about firing someone is quite humiliating though.

  • neron-fx

    “Is It Time to Ditch IE6?” … is the pope catholic?

    IE6 is an archaic browser which should have been dropped years ago. We don’t bring out 99% of films on VHS anymore do we?! So why should we spend 80% of our time bodging together disgusting hacks and horrid code for a browser that is fundementally flawed and from a time where people did not have as many browsing options as we do today!

    Outside of work I have pretty much dropped support IE6 and below simply because I am so sick and tired of working with it. At work I make everything work in IE6 because all systems in the company use that as their default browser (I do a lot of internal reporting applications.)

    I think its time for a change and I would like to be able to spend my time developing and actually producing great products without having to spend 80% of my time debugging everything in IE6.0 or dropping features completely because they simply don’t work!

  • Stevie D

    Why use a piece of software that is 7 years old?

    Because I have no choice. My work computer has Windows 2000, Office 2000 and IE6 on it. That’s about it. I can’t upgrade, and I can’t install an alternative browser. Millions of people are in the same position, using corporate networks where they have no option but to use IE6.

    Millions more people are using pre-XP versions of Windows and are unable to upgrade to IE7. Yes, they could switch to Firefox or Opera, but a lot of people won’t be bothered or interested in doing that.

    It depends what you mean by “support” IE6. I’ve had features on my website that only work for v7+ browsers for years – since Opera 7 at least – but they are non-essential features so I don’t worry about them not working in IE6. I could recreate some of those features with Javascript, but they aren’t essential so I can’t be bothered.

    If non-essential features or prettiness are sacrificed for older browsers, I think that’s acceptable, because the site still works. I don’t think it’s acceptable to effectively block IE6 users from a site, whether by actively preventing them from accessing it or by using design features that render it invisible or inoperable.

    My site stats have about 25% of “real” visitors using IE6, which is about the same number as all the non-IE users put together. Much as I would love to educate those people and get them using a proper browser, but I am not going to exclude them if they don’t.

  • http://www.cemerson.co.uk Stormrider

    “Microsoft should stop making browsers, they just can’t handle it. Same could be said for Outlook. Why MS continues to give us sh**y products is their secret, why we should put up with it is a mystery to me.”

    This just shows a complete lack of understanding as to why IE is in the state it is today. The fact is, IE is in this state through a combination of the early browser market, commercial pressures and users’ changing expectations, and MS are working hard to fix it with first IE7, and now IE8 with its standards mode.

    They might seem bad now, but at the time they were just what the market wanted. Now they have this legacy, they need to move away from it without breaking everything in the process – not exactly an easy job.

  • Stevie D

    Stormrider:

    “Microsoft should stop making browsers, they just can’t handle it. Same could be said for Outlook. Why MS continues to give us sh**y products is their secret, why we should put up with it is a mystery to me.”

    This just shows a complete lack of understanding as to why IE is in the state it is today. The fact is, IE is in this state through a combination of the early browser market, commercial pressures and users’ changing expectations, and MS are working hard to fix it with first IE7, and now IE8 with its standards mode.

    No, IE is in the state it is in today because MS has moved at a snail’s pace to improve things. Where Mozilla and Opera were churning out new versions every few months, MS didn’t release a new version for 5 years, and when they eventually did, they failed to support the latest standards, and they made it impossible for people using older versions of the OS to upgrade.

    Yes, when IE6 was launched, it a huge improvement … but the world moved on, and MS didn’t bother, they just sat back and enjoyed their unprecedented market share and ignored the fact that their browser, while a huge improvement, also had a great many shortcomings. By the time they did anything about it, they were too late.

    I’m pleased that MS are, finally, moving in the right direction with IE but let us not forget that they are only doing now what they ought to have done several years ago, and nothing more than that.

    And you’ve conveniently ignored the other issue – Outlook. While IE has been creeping forwards, Outlook has taken a huge leap backwards and is moving in completely the wrong direction. There is no excuse for this, other than pure arrogance from MS. If MS aren’t going to accept the need for interoperability in internet-based products, they have no business producing and selling them.

  • Dimitris

    I voted for yes, although I do not totally agree with overall dropping support for IE6. At least not yet.

    I think that adding support for newer features implemented by modern browsers, while keeping an older version for IE6 for some time(e.g. 6-12 months) is a good solution. The IE6 user will automatically fall back to the older version, while the rest will use the current version.

    In the meantime an unobtrusive message could inform the user that he/she uses an older version of the web app, due to lack of support for some features by IE6, along with options for upgrading or downloading a different browser. This puts the blame on the browser and not on the user neither on the web developer.

    You cannot force the user to upgrade or to use a different browser(or application). And it is certainly not our job, as developers, to do so. You have to, somehow, convince him :)

    PS. Excuse my english.

  • http://pcmech.com Force Flow

    Very interesting discussion.

    There appears to be a few different schools of thought:

    1) IE6 should be dumped because it’s old, buggy, and doesn’t work properly

    2) IE6 should be supported because some users are stuck with it due to corporate upgrade policies and/or permissions limitations and can’t install upgrades or alternative browsers

    3) IE6 should be supported because some users aren’t tech savvy and think the Internet is IE6.

    4) IE6 should be supported because clients and customers only care about conducting business, not what medium business is conducted on and if they adhere to certain programming/design standards.

    5) IE6 should be dropped because it’s no longer being currently shipped.

    Personally, I think if IE6 were dropped, it would make the lives of web developers a lot easier. But…then that would shift over to make the end-users’ lives a bit harder having to figure out the browser situation.

    Just think about any non-developer…as long as a piece of software appears functional, do you think they really care? That’s like trying to convince a car owner about how buying cars manufactured with 8-sided nuts are more efficient and easier and faster to screw in than cars being manufactured with 6-sided nuts. The car owner probably won’t care as long as the car doesn’t fall apart. Each type of nut performs the same function, right?

    This is how a good portion of end users see the world of browsers.

  • randywehrs

    Black Max,

    This approach is the worst kind of elitism.

    It isn’t elitism, it’s progress. If catering only to the users who don’t know any better, or can’t upgrade, we would never develop new and better ways of doing things on the web.. We would all be stuck in IE6 for eternity. Some things just have to be left behind in order to go forward.

  • fluminis

    Working for a bank company, all the development team work with Firefox and all the test team work with Firefox too.

    But our client still use IE6 ! Not testing on that browser gave us several patches on production server to correct the display for that 35% of users… and of course that represent a loose of money for the company.

    So, you can’t drop IE6 support even if you (and I) like to !

  • basicxman

    I don’t even test in IE6, I don’t care at all. It’s annoying enough to see all the little bugs in IE7, I don’t even want to know what IE6 displays ;)

    DOWN WITH INTERNET EXPLORER, if only there was someway to get M$ to ship with FF, yea right.

  • dougoftheabaci

    They might seem bad now, but at the time they were just what the market wanted. Now they have this legacy, they need to move away from it without breaking everything in the process – not exactly an easy job.

    It’s been a long time since the mid-90’s. I was a child at the time and MTV still played music videos regularly. A lot’s happened since then. I grew chest hair, for instance.

    As for the job being easy or not, it actually is. It’s the decision that’s not easy. But before we throw a pity parade for Microsoft let us not forget that it was they who put themselves in their current predicament. If they had kept up with web standards and improved incrementally like other major browsers then users wouldn’t be forced to choose between upgrading and possibly becoming incompatible with some mission-critical service or sticking with older tech for another few years until they have a better option.

    But beyond this I don’t understand why everyone is getting so excited about IE8. We did that for IE7, look how well that turned out. And this isn’t shaping up to be any better. For example, CSS2.1 is pretty much accepted by everyone in the web community. It’s not 100% official but it might as well be. IE8 is going to be the first Microsoft browser to “fully support” CSS2.1. As for CSS3? It’s already in Opera, Safari and Firefox (to varying degrees but mostly largely supported) but Microsoft is saying they are considering supported some of the most-requested CSS3 features. Not all, just some, and only those it deems developers want. This doesn’t lead me to be very hopeful as Microsoft has never been one to know what devs. want.

    Also, for those of you who haven’t heard, HTML5 became official today (http://www.w3.org/html/wg/html5/)! Great, right? The developer preview of Safari 4 (came out August 22nd) is already claiming HTML5 support, helps when one of your main guys is the editor for the standard. I would be extremely surprised to not find the same in the next release of Opera and though Firefox might take a bit longer to completely adopt this new standard I doubt it will take too long. Microsoft has stated that parts of HTML5 will make it into the final release but I’d be surprised if it was full support.

  • Jack Matier

    It isn’t elitism, it’s progress. If catering only to the users who don’t know any better, or can’t upgrade, we would never develop new and better ways of doing things on the web.. We would all be stuck in IE6 for eternity. Some things just have to be left behind in order to go forward.

    And things will move forward. IE8 will be launched, people every so often will get new computers which have windows Vista or used ones with XP. Administrators everywhere will eventually upgrade the browsers on the employee’s workstation. About a year ago we left behind IE < 6 pretty much for good, hell yes. Do you remember hacking away at those browsers? *that* was hell. Maybe a year more to go to consider leaving behind IE==6, maybe 2-3 years because of it being the only option on preXP machines. But it’ll happen.

    Unless you’re making web applications, supporting IE6 isn’t that huge of an issue. I don’t go out of my way to make things look pixel perfect on it and it seems already are doing so. In that sense, progression is already happening.

    We can’t forget the premise of the web is about the accessibility of information to the people who use it, whether they are disabled, hard of seeing/hearing/sensing/etcing, have shortening attention spans or at a library terminal with IE6 only, it’s something that can’t be overlooked. But it is being overlooked here. Self degrade to access, fine. Telling people about things better and informing, fine. Forcing upgrades. Not fine.

    I want to make the web accessible to as many as I feasibly can, in as a friendly manner as I can. I want to make the web accessible to at least my target audience.

    As much as I have an inner me who wants to eradicate IE* all together I know it’d be the wrong thing to do, especially considering that right now they usually include too much of that audience I speak of.

  • Jack Matier

    perfect on it and it seems already are doing so

    grrr.. I had meant to write “and it seems others are already doing so as well”

  • Mark McDonnell

    Although I voted “yes” to drop support for IE6 the majority of our company’s clients use it still (such as local authorities/councils) so it’s not feasible for us to just tell our clients “you must upgrade or else the new website we are building for your customers wont work when you and at least an ample percentage of your customers view it”.

    It’s not a black or white scenario there is a big grey area to consider.

  • Kelly Te Huna

    IE6 has been the thorn in the side of many a developer for many a year. Being forced to support a product that makes life nearly impossible at times, is nothing more than torture. How bad would it be for modern day mechanics to have to know how to fix and maintain cars from the early 1900’s?

    I for one would be a very happy man should IE6 disappear in to oblivion. DOWN WITH IE… err… 6!

  • malikyte

    As much as I’d love to drop support for IE6, when I code my HTML and make sure it validates completely, except for some annoying CSS issues, IE6 renders just fine, and I can fix that with conditional comments – which I don’t necessarily enjoy, but they’re there…

    Suffice it to say, approximately 40% of our site visitors still use IE6. I have a small percentage (slightly less than 1%) that still use IE5 or 5.5. I simply cannot drop support for IE6 because “it’s time”, it’s feasibly unacceptable for our business model (Public Library).

    With that being said, when I build websites for myself, I’m less careful over compatibility concerns. If I were to ever build sites for a client, I would probably charge a nominal fee to make it “perfectly” compatible with IE6. Once I see my IE6 usage drop below 5% I’ll stop supporting it. But, by that time, I don’t think we’ll yet need a CSS refresh anyhow. Fixing a couple IE8 quirks with my navigation list will be my main concern.

  • Moi

    This debate is so ridiculous and if any of you are stupid enough to stop supporting IE6 then good luck to you. My clients want 100% of users to be able to view their websites, and for it it to work. Making sites not work in IE6 isnt going to make people upgrade as so many users (e.g. my father) dont have any idea about browser versions (or how to upgrade), they just want to be able to view websites.
    Its the same with the whole FF Vs IE debate, why are people still going on about this? IE will never die unless microsoft stop making so people should stip whinging and just get on with it. With out these issues most of us wouldnt be able to charge as much as we do for websites.

  • http://www.historycommons.org/ Black Max

    Winterheat, I had no intention of humiliating you. I also had no way to know that you were joking. Taken seriously, your statement was, to my mind, a firing offense. It works better as a joke :)

    Outside of work I have pretty much dropped support IE6 and below simply because I am so sick and tired of working with it. At work I make everything work in IE6 because all systems in the company use that as their default browser (I do a lot of internal reporting applications.)

    You’ve summed up the problem nicely. We all want to stop supporting IE6, but we don’t have that choice because a kazillion companies and a blue million users still use it.

    My site stats have about 25% of “real” visitors using IE6, which is about the same number as all the non-IE users put together. Much as I would love to educate those people and get them using a proper browser, but I am not going to exclude them if they don’t.

    Suffice it to say, approximately 40% of our site visitors still use IE6. I have a small percentage (slightly less than 1%) that still use IE5 or 5.5. I simply cannot drop support for IE6 because “it’s time”, it’s feasibly unacceptable for our business model (Public Library).

    There you go.

    About a year ago we left behind IE < 6 pretty much for good, hell yes. Do you remember hacking away at those browsers? *that* was hell. Maybe a year more to go to consider leaving behind IE==6, maybe 2-3 years because of it being the only option on preXP machines. But it’ll happen.

    You’re right. Anyone remember coding for NS4? *collective shudder*

    I think its time for a change and I would like to be able to spend my time developing and actually producing great products without having to spend 80% of my time debugging everything in IE6.0 or dropping features completely because they simply don’t work!

    Me, too, me too. Please don’t take anything I’ve posted as a defense of IE6. It is catastrophically bad.

  • dougoftheabaci

    @Black Max: Would agree that there are some situations where it’s OK not to provide direct support for IE? For instance on my smaller projects where the number of users with IE6 is below 30% I tend not to support it. These sorts of projects tend not to have the sort of code or features that would leave IE6 users completely out in the cold and more often than not the client is more than happy when I tell them it will significantly drop development time if I’m not supporting IE6 past basic functionality.

    I think a big problem people are having with the “drop support for IE6″ comments is that they think we either mean make it so IE6 users can’t even access the site or that providing IE6 users with a website that doesn’t look correct but still allows them to access information is going to very negatively effect how people view their site.

    I doubt anyone means the first because even though we dislike IE6 there aren’t many reasons to outright stop them from using the site. As to the second I don’t think that’s the case. Now my opinion doesn’t mean too much but it’s an opinion that is also held by Andy Clarke, author of “Transcending CSS” and one of the authors of the CSS3 spec. at the W3C. He believes that as long as you provide those individual with out of date browsers a way to access all the same information as more up to date users then those out of date users will understand.

    He says, and I agree, most people know and understand that if they don’t have the latest programs they can’t expect to be able to do everything.

    Let’s take the example of someone who works in an office and is forced to use IE6 because certain internal web-based applications or websites require it. If they browse the net with IE6 and the sites don’t come up right, there’s a good chance they understand this is because they are using an outdated browser.

    Not everyone with IE6 doesn’t know there are alternatives. It may be true for a select few but I really doubt they are anywhere near a majority of those currently using IE6. And those individuals who do know about better browsers will be understanding that their old browser can’t view a page as well as a newer browser would. Because of this I still say that in a lot of situations it’s OK to stop direct support for IE6, just as long as you still make content accessible to older browsers. But that’s more an issue of degradability of code and less an issue with updating a browser.

  • someone

    Uh no, we should not drop support of IE6 – especially if you intend to make any money off your site or use it as a marketing tool. Doing so means to sacrifice a portion of your business for a weak ideal. I’d rather sacrifice one or two hours developing (hacking) a site — that meets up to 1/3 of those who come to my site — than kiss that business goodbye because the user didn’t fit into a snobby little box. So stupid… just keep meeting those clients until the demand takes the market somewhere else.

  • http://www.studio-gecko.com/ XLCowBoy

    I would have to say that I agree with dougoftheabaci.

    His thoughts are pretty close to what I had in mind.

    After all, a small popup that says “Our website has detected that you are using an outdated browser. We would like to inform you that this website was designed with modern technology in mind, and thus, your browsing experience may be affected as a result. If you wish to discover all of the features we have prepared for you, we strongly suggest that you upgrade your browser to the latest releases”

    …or something along those lines. We’re not shutting out users, in fact, we are informing them that “hey, you’re being left behind – time to catch up!”.

    If you’re using an old car, you know it’s not going to have the features of a newer model. People know that, and therein lies the window for us developers to inform, push, and prod users into upgrading.

  • Thomas Hansen

    You know we can all help ;)
    I am helping, if you visit Ra-Ajax website using IE you will see a message giving you hints about that “you’re using a broken browser” with a link to getfirefox.com :)

  • Kate

    The problem is that there are a noticeable percentage of users that still use IE6 as their browser. However faulty the browser, the users may not know the difference. So, in my opinion, in most cases, I see no reason not to support it… for now. If the percentage goes down a little further, then perhaps I could justify it. But, I don’t see any reason to leave that many users thinking: “Hey, why doesn’t this site work?” It’s not a great browser as regards Web standards. In fact, it’s pretty awful. But, it’s still a rather widely used browser. And often, most workarounds don’t require that much more work. Annoying, maybe, but not worth doing? I don’t think so, at least for me.

  • http://www.sky-web.net/ Dr John

    If I right a PHP script that calls for an integer value and it accepts a float or a letter, crashes the system and annoys the user, the client complains. So I make it work by issuing an error message. Or I don’t get paid.

    If I rigt a non-normalised database that then causes lots of problems, the client complains about problems. So I nomralise it, even though the client doesn’t know what the word means. Or I don’t get paid.

    If i use a combination of low contrast colours, making it very hard for some users to use a system, the client complains, so i don’t do that.

    And if i make a website that crshes in 35% of th eusers’ browsers, the client complains. and i definately don’t get paid.

    So face reality, we work for clients, we give them what they need. We are not here to preach to the masses and convert them to our favourite browser, we are here to do a job, and that includes making the website work in the vast majority of users’ browsers, FOR OUR CLIENTS.

    Even if we do wish IE6 would go away for ever, we can’t drop support for it, and we certainly can’t force people to use our favourite browser. I remember the days of “best viewed in XYZ vp.q browser” and most people just moved on to a different site, they didn’t jump up and download the recommended browser.

    So face up to it making a site work in IE6 isn’t difficult. so do it.

  • Joen

    It is so very much time to ditch Internet Explorer 6. Keeping support for it is counter productive, both to the web, to web developers and to end users.

    Moving on ensures security and possibilities for advancing the web.

    I’ve written a larger tirade on it (http://noscope.com/journal/2008/08/ditching-ie6) and even created a public domain / copyright free badge for the occasion. (http://noscope.com/photostream/various/no_ie6s.png/view)

  • The Vinh

    Yes, i agree with this view, web developer need to drop support IE6. IE6 is rendering not good and so many bugs.

  • Ian Ozsvald (ProCasts.co.uk)

    See IE8 and Firefox 3 in action – I’ve created a screencast comparing the two which aims to convince you to switch to Firefox:
    http://showmedo.com/videos/video?name=3150000&fromSeriesID=315

    I appeal to IE6 users to Please Upgrade To Something That Isn’t 7 Years Old! The screencast also shows the viewer how to get IE7, IE8 and FF3. Security records, plug-ins and the Awesome Bar are shown. Show this to anyone who is doesn’t know that IE6 is out dated or are afraid of ‘what changes’ if they upgrade.

  • fantata

    Well, I’d dearly love to stop hacking for IE6, as we all would – it’s a pain and makes our lives just that bit more annoying than it needs to be.

    But like most of whats been said here, we can’t afford to turn away 25% of our (bookshop) traffic.

    How about we all just have a browser sniff & start telling people prominently on the page that they should be upgrading, with a link to the IE7 page?

  • Vlk

    I am not sure, but the internet is for users … they should decide what is good enough for them. Not developers, but users. So I try to support IE6 still – 30% of customers is to much to say “bye old ones”.

  • Stevie D

    How about we all just have a browser sniff & start telling people prominently on the page that they should be upgrading, with a link to the IE7 page?

    It’s barely even browser-sniffing, all you need to do is put it in conditional comments.

    But I don’t think it will have much of an effect. A big chunk of IE6 users are unable to upgrade to IE7, and a big chunk of those are unable to upgrade to Firefox or Opera either. And most of the rest would ignore your message or not understand it.

    It’s very tempting, particularly for my own website rather than a commercial/client site, but I reckon you would lose more potential customers through having that notice than you would convince to upgrade.

  • John

    I think that the best comparison that can be drawn that has been vaguely touched upon a number of times above is with comparison to the film industry and its formats.

    Was it considered to be punishing the user when DVD’s were being produced instead of VHS? The transition time between the two formats was relatively small (certainly less than 7 years) and I don’t remember any consumer outcry about people having to buy a DVD player and now DVD’s.

    The benefit was clear – better quality, easy storage, longer lasting, and with bonus features and interactive content.

    The film industry very quickly stopped producing movies on VHS and as such users were forced to upgrade, something similar may have been possible for IE6 if there was a united front ceasing support at the same time.
    If one website doesn’t work then the user will think “the site is broken” if 100 websites don’t work then the user will thing “my computer is broken” and fix it by upgrading.

    I think apple have made a great step forward by dropping support of IE6 with MobileMe, and I personally have dropped all support, small as my contribution may be I think that the more people who drop support for the browser and insert conditional comments on their sites explaining how and why users should upgrade, the smoother the transition will be, and the greater consumer awareness will become.

  • malikyte

    It’s very tempting, particularly for my own website rather than a commercial/client site, but I reckon you would lose more potential customers through having that notice than you would convince to upgrade.

    I don’t know. Sitepoint’s book advertisements that attach at a fixed position to the bottom of the page is quite elegant. Allowing it to save a cookie to “Don’t show this again” is also quite useful. I think I had a hit from a Windows 3.1 OS a couple months back, but like someone else said, they can’t expect full compatibility, and as unfortunate as it may be that people with hand-me-down computers with Windows 95/98 cannot upgrade, as long as it’s not a large enough percentage – we should *try* to inform our site visitors — so long as we’re the person behind the website; if we’re simply creating websites for clients, we should be making sure it works without any annoying messages.

  • Anonymous

    The biggest fear I get when cutting support from older browsers is that potential customers or visitors won’t bother downloading the 20-odd or so megabytes that are IE7, and then take the time to install it. Yes, some people are this lazy or sometimes have a poor internet connection to justify not doing this on a whim.

    Sometimes it’s a matter of a corporate-wide decision for the upgrade to take place. My company went to a client’s location to test his website out with his employees and they had IE6 as standard on their work PCs. So we see a lot of discrepancies as our dev team uses mostly Firefox or IE7. Though it’s good to have those IE7 devs as they tend to catch more bugs.

  • TheBuzzSaw

    I’m a little annoyed at those who think we, the developers, are “forcing” this decision upon users. We are NOT saying, “You will use this browser and ONLY this browser. Go to this other site, download it, and install this exact version. No other browser will suffice. Do it, or get off our site!” What we ARE saying is this, “Please, choose any browser you want. There are so many selections: IE7, Firefox, Opera, Safari, etc. The ONLY one we don’t want is IE6 because it is extremely old and does not permit this site to render properly.”

    I remember back in the day when web sites would display a splash screen saying, “This site requires Browser X Version Y with Plugin Z.” Yeah, THAT was annoying. That is not what is happening with this case of IE6. Developers are pleading to users to use ANYTHING but IE6, ANYTHING AT ALL! Developers are not forcing/coercing users to do anything; the users are the ones hugging their toy (IE6) and throwing a fit at having to make one small change. This is not like those sites that require FLASH to do anything; this is like DOS users complaining that Windows programs aren’t running right. >_>

  • http://altoonadesign.com halfasleeps

    I only have one computer at home, so for my own website it’s hard to support IE6 becuase I dont have anyway to “view” what my page looks like in IE6 without using a virtual machine.

  • http://www.affiliateprogramdirectory.com bgray

    Without question, IE6 is no longer considered for me. I’m seeing users in the teens and lower using the browser from my sites.

  • http://www.waterfallweb.net/ RockyShark

    I think that most people in favour of dropping support for IE6 probably don’t actually deal with real clients on a regular basis. I still see people using Office 2000 – that’s older than IE6. Who are we to demand what software others choose to use? Seems a little arrogant.

    I’m sorry, but I thought we’d seen the end of the days where web designers would specify what browser someone should use. Let’s not go back to that.

    Also – if you drop support for a browser with any sort of significant market share, what does that say about your commitment to accessibility?

    IE6 is not *that* hard to support anyway. If your HTML and CSS is kept clean and lean, you’ll generally only need a couple of corrections in an IE6 stylesheet that you can call via a conditional. The only time I’ve seen people really battle with IE6 is if they’ve had tag soup to begin with.

    C’mon guys, if IE6 were gone you’d all be whinging about something else. It ain’t that bad. Really.

    Gotta give points for the blog post though – nothing seems to whip everyone up quite like and IE6 bash! ;)

  • http://www.afterlight.net.au AussieJohn

    I am not sure, but the internet is for users … they should decide what is good enough for them. Not developers, but users. So I try to support IE6 still – 30% of customers is to much to say “bye old ones”.

    I agree with you Vlk that 30% of users is something we shouldn’t turn our backs on – having said that, I can’t at all agree with the rest of that statement.

    The web might be for users, but so are the roads, supermarkets and museums. If we were to let the web be governed by users, it would be quite the mess.

    Developers need to pave the way to move on to new technologies. I already implement some sites to not have certain functionality on websites viewed in IE6 but rather scaled down content. For example a lightbox image gallery might be turned on for all browsers except IE6 and less. or a “tabbed” element might not have drop shadows on its tabs because I use GIFs instead of 24-bit PNGs in IE6.

  • http://www.waterfallweb.net/ RockyShark

    …not have certain functionality on websites viewed in IE6 but rather scaled down content. For example a lightbox image gallery might be turned on for all browsers except IE6 and less. or a “tabbed” element might not have drop shadows on its tabs because I use GIFs instead of 24-bit PNGs in IE6.

    And that’s fair enough too, AussieJohn, in offering graceful degradation you’re really still supporting IE6. I think you’d agree that you can’t just leave a site ‘broken’.

    I suppose it depends on your definition of ‘support’…

  • dougoftheabaci

    Who are we to demand what software others choose to use? Seems a little arrogant.

    Ah, so you support every browser model, old and new?

    I’m sorry, but I thought we’d seen the end of the days where web designers would specify what browser someone should use. Let’s not go back to that.

    Also – if you drop support for a browser with any sort of significant market share, what does that say about your commitment to accessibility?

    We’re not saying they can’t use it. We’re saying that they have to understand that if they use software that is almost a decade old and is quickly approaching a second major version update that they can’t expect the same experience as those individuals who keep up to date.

    As for accessibility, it doesn’t say much. Accessibility is much more than just which browsers you support but how your code is written, what languages you code in, how standards compliant you are… If anything not supporting IE6 does more for accessibility than supporting it since IE6 often requires you to do hacks that aren’t standards compliant and negatively effect accessibility.

    IE6 is not *that* hard to support anyway. If your HTML and CSS is kept clean and lean, you’ll generally only need a couple of corrections in an IE6 stylesheet that you can call via a conditional. The only time I’ve seen people really battle with IE6 is if they’ve had tag soup to begin with.

    So not directly supporting it shouldn’t really be a problem either. If users with a 7 year old browser get double-margins then I’m OK with that.

    C’mon guys, if IE6 were gone you’d all be whinging about something else. It ain’t that bad. Really.

    Gotta give points for the blog post though – nothing seems to whip everyone up quite like and IE6 bash! ;)

    That’s because IE is the biggest scourge on the net. Second only to other Microsoft products… Oh, and if there wasn’t IE6 I’d be more vocal about how horrible IE7 was. If there wasn’t that I’d be saying IE8 is pathetic. I just downloaded the new beta (released today) and got a 12/100 on Acid 3!

    OK, at the end of this discussion, I still don’t see a legitimate reason to continue direct support for IE6.

    The number of IE6 users might be rather big but they’re mostly people who know it’s an out of date browser. Thus they’ll understand if it doesn’t work completely as expected. Again, that’s not just my opinion, that’s the opinion of Andy Clarke, Apple, 37signals…

    And here’s another angle people are ignoring. If the site doesn’t show up perfectly people will still stick around. Steve Krug talks about how users will stick around even if a site is throwing up errors left and right and otherwise malfunctioning and just think it’s either their fault or it’ll be more of a problem to go to a competitor. Do you really think they’ll be that upset about a little margin or float issue?

    And as long as you are standards compliant and responsible about how you develop you’ll have minimal issues with IE6 anyway! All you’re doing is not going in to fix those little problems which saves you a lot of time while only slightly inconveniencing a smaller portion of your audience who tend to be rather understanding about it.

    Throw in a little warning if you really feel it’s necessary and call it a day.

  • Silwolffe

    Just as it’s not ‘difficult’ to code in Internet Explorer 6, It’s not a difficult task to upgrade from Internet Explorer 6. Sure, there may be restrictions – such as a computer being used for company purpose and your access is limited to what you can and cannot upgrade, but even if that’s the case the point should be brought up that IE6 is an atrocious browser in terms of security and functionality.

    Shouldn’t that be an incentive enough to want an upgrade?

    I believe that, in the end, dropping IE6 support would be doing a client a favor to get them out of such a disgusting, revolting web browser. It may not be the practical or best way to go about it, but if enough developers DROP support – well, eventually people will have to bite the bullet and take ten minutes to upgrade their browsers.

    I vote YES.

  • TheBuzzSaw

    IE6 is not *that* hard to support anyway. If your HTML and CSS is kept clean and lean, you’ll generally only need a couple of corrections in an IE6 stylesheet that you can call via a conditional. The only time I’ve seen people really battle with IE6 is if they’ve had tag soup to begin with.

    Hmmm. In my experience, you have it backwards. IE6 is terrible at rendering standards-compliant code. It is mostly CSS where IE6 falls on its face. I find that having atrocious tag soup is far better looking in IE6 than XHTML 1.0 Strict with lots of efficient CSS. In these cases, fixing IE6 is a royal headache and usually involved injecting tag soup into the affected areas.

  • TheBuzzSaw

    Happy Birthday, IE6.

    Now go die in a fire.

  • www.AamirAfridi.com

    well the only problem will be the people who have IE6 built-in on there browswers and downloading latest browsers on their very slow connections will take ages to download 20-30MB files. But it is not as painful as the developer put alot of hacks for css and javascript to support IE6

  • http://www.waterfallweb.net/ RockyShark

    In these cases, fixing IE6 is a royal headache and usually involved injecting tag soup into the affected areas.

    Okay, you’ve lost me a bit here… You simply call an IE6 stylesheet using a conditional comment (the technique has been covered elsewhere on Sitepoint and plenty of other places) and put any style changes there. Why do you need to inject tag soup?

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m no IE6 fan, but the passion whipped up here is a little over the top. Netscape 4? *That* was a sucky browser, with no conditional comment facility to get you out of trouble. Often the only fix was to build 2 totally different pages and use javascript browser sniffing to direct visitors one way or the other. IE6? Meh… It ain’t that bad…

  • http://www.acmultimedia.co.uk acmultimedia

    It’s a tricky decision to make for sure. If it was up to me then I would agree with the majority and ditch IE6, however, when I have to tell clients that we are ignoring 30% of their potential visitors it’s not so black and white.

    I think that as long as IE6 has such a large share we will continue to support it. Having said that, we won’t be making sure that the site looks pizel perfect in IE6 – merely that it works and functions as expected.

  • Noah Yamen

    YES. Id like to hang IE6. CSS based layouts are horrendous to develop. I saw put a patch in your websites that provides a preview, but if they want to see the whole thing and enjoy the experience they need to upgrade. I’ve stopped personally developing for IE6.

    Face it, the day will come where no one uses it any more, as old people get older and new generations arise, there will be a day soon when ie6 is nothing but history… and im ready for that.

  • TheBuzzSaw

    @RockyShark – Yes, I am well aware of IE’s conditional statements for including IE6-specific stylesheets. I used to use them until I officially declared IE6 not worth it. The point I was making was that it is easier to add a few extra tags (thus, gunking up my beautiful XHTML) to make IE6 cooperate than it was to simply play with CSS since IE6 lacks so much functionality in that department. I also do not like injecting a million classes into my XHTML just for the sake of IE6. Because IE6 cannot use the various CSS reference operators, I have to use classes by the boatload.

    Perhaps I make radically different pages than you do, RockyShark. My older pages were pretty easy to fix and clean up for IE6. Now, I guess I go crazy with CSS drop-down menus, hover effects, :before/:after effects, etc. I open the page up in IE6, and I realize that I essentially have to rebuild the page from scratch for IE6.

  • http://www.yellowshoe.com.au/ markbrown4

    IE6 is still a very relevant browser.

    If you’re being paid to build a professional website it should work consistently in IE6, IE7, Firefox, Opera and Safari.

    I’ve only recently dropped support for IE5.5 – though the company I work for is still contracted to make it function in IE5.5+

    Trying to prove a point by putting out a site that is buggy in IE6 is unprofessional and I wouldn’t pay money for it.

  • dougoftheabaci

    IE6 is still a very relevant browser.

    If you’re being paid to build a professional website it should work consistently in IE6, IE7, Firefox, Opera and Safari.

    I disagree 100%. Part of our jobs is to provide the best experience possible for our key-users. But we do need to have some loyalty to ourselves and to the community. We’re not saying make a completely unusable website in IE6, we’re saying don’t fix those minor bugs.

    I’ve only recently dropped support for IE5.5 – though the company I work for is still contracted to make it function in IE5.5+

    That’s highly excessive. IE5.5 hasn’t been a relevant browser for half a decade.

    Trying to prove a point by putting out a site that is buggy in IE6 is unprofessional and I wouldn’t pay money for it.

    Again, I’ll tell Apple, 37signals, and a very large portion of the developer community that you said so.

  • TheBuzzSaw

    Again, markbrown4, it is one thing to demand users convert to one specific browser; it is totally different to ask users to convert to a modern browser of his/her choice that is NOT freakin’ seven years old. People continue to use IE6 because they are completely ignorant to the problems presented by that browser. That is why I work to INFORM my users through my IE6 script that warns the user to upgrade in order to view the site properly.

    You just recently dropped IE5.5 support? Wow, welcome to the 21st century…

  • div^

    A friend of me already stopped IE6 Support and I think I´ll do that in future too and get in some message box telling the visitor to swtich over to the new version. I don´t understand why people still use that old browser. Even our school has IE7, Opera and Firefox installed…. and our admin isn´t the smartest at all.

  • neron-fx

    A friend of me already stopped IE6 Support and I think I´ll do that in future too and get in some message box telling the visitor to swtich over to the new version. I don´t understand why people still use that old browser. Even our school has IE7, Opera and Firefox installed…. and our admin isn´t the smartest at all.

    I do agree with what you are saying in a way. I don’t think the

    “We could upgrade to IE 7 but its a pain in the butt…”

    excuse should be a good enough not to upgrade their business systems or networks. Surely its much more important to maintain the networks security and integrity of these business systems at all costs.

    I think in general (with the odd exception)that the excuse used above is from lazy ass sys admins who really cant be bothered doing their job properly, and who also tell you to “Reboot your computer” at every problem you encounter! :o) That is not a jibe at sys admins by the way before you all start jumping down my throat! I know your jobs are not easy I am referring to the genuinely bad ones who don’t do stuff just because its a pain :o) We have excpetionally good sys admin at my place of work who keep everything up to date and will bend over backwards to help you :o)

    However I will continue to develop for IE 6.0 professionally (All work I do with the exception of personal projects) as for the time being we are stuck with it.

  • David Jennings

    I state in all new web proposals that my company will no longer support IE6 by default. We WILL support it, or any other non-current browser, for any client willing to pay 20% more. Giving clients this option up-front takes the burden of decision out of my hands and places it back in theirs.

    Our non-support of the horrible IE6 has given us the ability to build sites better, faster AND cheaper. So far no client has requested to pay extra for IE6, and they have each understood and supported the reasons.

  • neron-fx

    I state in all new web proposals that my company will no longer support IE6 by default. We WILL support it, or any other non-current browser, for any client willing to pay 20% more. Giving clients this option up-front takes the burden of decision out of my hands and places it back in theirs.

    Our non-support of the horrible IE6 has given us the ability to build sites better, faster AND cheaper. So far no client has requested to pay extra for IE6, and they have each understood and supported the reasons.

    Thats actaully quite a good idea :o) Not sure how many of my freelance clients would bite though! Work would most certainly hate the idea of me asking for a 20% pay rise to make stuff work in IE6 HAHA!

  • http://www.digitalgreenlight.com busy

    I didn’t read any of the comments, but my take is that sites should function normally and not look completely awful in IE6, but I no longer spend any more time than necessary and I don’t mind minor problems showing up in it.

  • Griever, Web developer

    Personally, i’d love to see IE 6 burn.
    This is not because it’s old.
    It’s because it proves a risk to the user, and in turn can harm a company.
    Why support a browser that invites attacks and promotes bugs.
    I know corporate busnisses do not want to update because their intranet wouldn’t work correctly.

    Develop a new intranet is what I’d say.
    Now some might say, that that will cost a company to much money.
    But seriously, IE 6 is old, ancient in internet age.
    Updating the itnranet provides the company with a more interactive and faster intranet, cleaner code and better support.

    Sure a lot of coding will come along, but the time saved that would’ve been spend making it IE 6 complient, would not exist, and be saved on the costs, or if the company really wishes to go the extra mile, that time and money could be used to improve the intranet even more.

    And let’s not forget the user, if we make websites work in IE 6, we promote it, and thusly we tell the user that it’s ok to use it, while in fact it endangers their system.

    IE 6 is a browser that should disapear.
    It will save companies money that would’ve otherwise been spend on IE 6 support.
    It will save companies time.
    It will make life easier for web developers, allowing us developers to actually improve things, rather than fix things.

    It will improve speed on website, as there’s less code to be used.

    Besides, an intranet that still depends on IE 6, sounds like a out dated intranet, that could really improve if some time and money would’ve been spend on it.

  • techachino.com

    The people who voted no obviously have not had to try and make any half decent site work in that blasted browser…

  • BlueBoden

    I’ve had my share of IE6 Problems, and i run a major site with Tutorials and References for Web Designers, found at http://www.brugbart.com.

    I would advice everyone to stop supporting IE6, and/or other older browsers for that matter. I would say that its a very unprofessional decision to support older browsers on out part, there might be unique cases where it would be needed, but i actually can’t think of any.

    We as Web Designers need to teach our users how important it is to upgrade their browser, just as they would upgrade any other software on their computer.

    While XP is supported for some time still, i would say that its more then safe to start telling people to upgrade. We have had a bad start as web designers, with poor support for web standards, it has been pure guesswork how to get something to work at times.

    Finally the browsers are beginning to catch up, and we really need to get people to upgrade their browsers as fast as possible, and change the general understanding that we should keep supporting browsers whos useful life ended years ago.

    I will continiue to tell people to stop supporting older browsers, and that will also be the message on my website, i really hope that more of you will do the same.

  • http://www.infolinkit.com.au/ gold coast website design

    as a last issue due to the horrific html and css rendering of IE6 some pages does not look pretty in IE7. Therefore some companies won’t upgrade since they would break their intranet of other web applications with an upgrade.