SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hi everybody =), i just wanted to know, how often should i code when i read my html book?

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,483
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Its probably a good idea to code whenever you learn a major new feature, like tables or something.
    It would help you to remember all the code, and you would get some practical experience with HTML.
    It would be difficult to read the book, then start coding (thats what I did, now I regret it)

  3. #3
    SitePoint Evangelist
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    England
    Posts
    587
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In my opinion it is hard to get information to go in when you are doing pointless tutorials...

    pick a subject, and design a 5 page website around it.. Say to yourself I will include ni it links, a form, tables images etc... It dosen;t matter how rubbish the design is, you don;t even have to design anything,, As long as you have 5 interlinking pages then you will learn html much quicker then just typing out a table as an example....

    I played around with html for a while and it was kind otf going in. Then I built a site and I learnt the lot very quickly...

    Just my opinion..

  4. #4
    SitePoint Guru Vincent Puglia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    where the World once stood
    Posts
    700
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Whenever I read a book on coding, I try to envision how I would use a property or function or tag. If I find something extremely interesting or somewhat difficult to understand, I'll code it with loads of alerts, and once I understand it, I'll start changing the code to see how things really work.

    In other words, you don't need to code <html><head></head>......</html>. But you might try coding variations of:
    <table><tr><td></td></tr><tr><td></td></tr></table>
    <table><tr><td><table><tr><td></td></tr></table></td></tr></table>

    Vinny
    Where the World Once Stood
    the blades of grass
    cut me still

  5. #5
    Kat's Meow Senior ******* WebKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    1,071
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know at what level you are in terms of building your first web page - that can make a difference and you haven't indicated

    I do know that when I started 2 years ago, just picking up a HTML Book and trying to build a page was so overwhelming that I thought that a hyperlink was the most complicated thing ever built, let alone trying to build a full page! Trying to understand "<table><tr><td></td></tr><tr><td></td></tr></table>" seemed impossible...

    So I began with Homestead-Online Editor to create my first page, while learning the behind the scenes about what made the page work. Which made learning WYSIWYG Editors like FrontPage and Dreamweaver all the easier - especially as I knew the HTML to correct and edit when necessary. WYSIWYG programs have been discussed here in the forums and have their pros and cons, but 'Visually' it was the best way for me to learn. I now use Dreamweaver3 exclusively...

    'Coding' by hand has NOW become understandable, and I would never have learned web design so comprehensively had I done it any other way - and I am continually learning.

    I agree with Cloughie that you need to just jump in, create a web page and the try various scripts and tags, one at a time, previewing your page to see exactly what each does! Learn how to make a link and build from there...

    'Visual' learning has always worked the best for me, so having a program such as the Evrsoft Free Download of 1st Page 2000 may be helpful for you to try building a web page and immediately have a preview of your work. There are levels from beginner to expert, so you can work at your own pace. You can learn HTML at the same time, so that it all will come together for you...

    There are many helpful sites such as HTML Goodies, WebMonkey. HTML-About.com AND of course the many resources of SitePoint, including interacting with members of this Forum, that can make your path easier learning HTML and web design. Tutorials also do have a place in learning to create web pages...there are some great tutorials about PhotoShop, PaintShop, HTML, JavaScript and more. Begin now bookmarking websites for help down the line...such as Graphix Land - HTML Tutorials, Photoshop Tutorials, Promoting, PSP, Corel Draw, Flash

    Trial & Error is always the best learning tool that you can use, backing it up with a few of the best resource sites on the web - especially SitePoint - and a good HTML reference book on your desk! But there is no One Way to learn web design, we have all found the way that works best for us, so you will hear many differing opinions...

    But you have to find the way that is best for you - always remember that!


    [Edited by WebKat on 10-06-2000 at 05:37 PM]
    Dlynn :: SitePoint Senior Advisor ::
    PawPrint Designs by WebKat
    "Dogs come when they're called; Cats take a message and get back to you later." ~ Mary Bly

  6. #6
    Don't get too close, I bite! Nicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    8,277
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Webkat is right, everyone is different.
    Have you thought about goign on a course just to get you goign on the basics? I'm sure your local college will run one. Courses are good not only because you have a teacher to help you out at the beginning, but also you can compare notes with other students and bounce ideas of each other. I teach beginner's web development and I encourage students to walk around the class and have a look at each others wprk and discuss the problems they have encoutnered and any tips they have learned.

    I start the students off creating an actual website rather than just practising meaningless exercises. Basically, at the end of the course they have a working website. I encourage them to do something that is useful to thema nd which they can take away and reuse. I always recommend an interactive CV. However, some of them choose to do something else, such as if they own a business they will make a stat on their business website, or maybe they will do a website on their family and so forth. The important thing is that you have a workable project which means soemthing to you.

  7. #7
    @russellg RussellG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland
    Posts
    449
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I made my first website on Homestead as well, in fact, I though thats how everyone made there sites...

    Then I found out thats not how it works on the http://www. So I bought a book on HTML (HTML 4.0 for dummies) and started reading that.

    At the time I had actually downloaded Coffeecup HTML Editor and was trying to use that. I found that a lot of the stuff in the book could be done easily using coffeecup.

    Just a side not, I have found that WYSIWYG editors actually help you learn HTML. You look at the code it has done and then you your like "woah that is so l33t, I totally understand that now! I am da bomb, so BOOYA!"

    Anyway, read a couple of the sections at once (not just one, a couple.) and put them together.

    Thats how I learnt anyway.
    russell.cz.cc - coming soon (I promise!)

  8. #8
    SitePoint Guru Vincent Puglia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    where the World once stood
    Posts
    700
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi RusselG,

    Your comment about learning by looking at wysiwyg editors is a good one. However, with Front Page a lot of extraneous nonsense gets output as well as some definitely non-crossBrowser code -- for example:
    1) excessive font tags
    2) webbot garbage
    3) no form tags (dependent upon whether you insert, cut&paste, or copy)

    You still need a book or some other form of tutorial/reference.
    Vinny
    Where the World Once Stood
    the blades of grass
    cut me still

  9. #9
    @russellg RussellG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland
    Posts
    449
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry i should have been more clear. I meant WYSIWYG editors like Dreamweaver, Homesite etc.
    russell.cz.cc - coming soon (I promise!)

  10. #10
    SitePoint Zealot thespian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by MNazif
    hi everybody =), i just wanted to know, how often should i code when i read my html book?
    If you are at the beginner level, may I suggest that you try Joe Barta's "So You Want to Build a Web Page" at http://www.pagetutor.com

    He will lead you through the basics by holding your hand every step of the way. He also has a great sense of humour and keeps you interested all the way through.

    His tutorial is also totally FREE of charge.

    Hope this helps
    Bill Conté [Protected by Psalm 91]
    Web Mechanix
    Growing OLD is Mandatory - Growing UP is Optional!

  11. #11
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Then again, if you get Web Express (another wysiwyg editor) for $69 and do 10 web sites of 10 pages each saving 1 hour on each page over hand coding, you would be coding for 69 cents an hour. Not me, I use Web Express and tweak the code by hand if necessary (not often). Take a look at:
    http://www.mvd.com
    Win a FREE book that's not an Ebook
    http://www.wii-fm.com


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •