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  1. #1
    SitePoint Member DickTurpin's Avatar
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    windows server 2003 testing environment | learning best practices

    Hello everyone

    I'm starting to study Windows Server 2003 for future (I'm planning to host a website, and installation of custom software using it)

    I'm just beginning with my learning process and I need some advice for when things get more complicated, let me explain myself:

    I'm already renting the physical server and the software required to run the network operating system properly (windows server 2003, MySQL license, etc), I'm now able to connect to it using a remote connection from my office computer. But for practicing and researching purposes I would like to be able to "play" with the service in a more testing environment (in case I mess up) just to have more freedom to apply what I learn without the fear of messing everything up.

    Could you guys give me any recommendation of what will be the best approach in this case, maybe installing windows server on my house computer (which is where I study) or something else.

    The thing is that the books that I'm using are gonna start getting into more difficult and complicated topics and areas of the program and I would also like to work along those examples, to get familiar with the program in the best way as to access those areas of the program from my house.

    Any ideas or recommendations are highly appreciated

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
    wwb_99's Avatar
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    Windows Server 2003 is now 3 versions behind and is woefully out of date. You really should start with Windows Server 2012.

    In general, the best practice is to use VMs to play with and focus on scripted, automated and repeatable.

  3. #3
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    Get a cheap desktop computer (or laptop) and install Windows Server on it. Just be prepared to reinstall OS when you mess up -- multiple reinstalls comes with the territory when you are learning in a lab environment.

    I agree with poster above to start with Windows 2012 (or even 2008). However, don't worry about VPS until you learn all the basics of the server OS, it will complicate rather than simplify things for you. Later learn Hyper-V and start setting up VPSes.

  4. #4
    Foozle Reducer ServerStorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Collabora View Post
    ... However, don't worry about VPS until you learn all the basics of the server OS, it will complicate rather than simplify things for you. Later learn Hyper-V and start setting up VPSes.
    Respectfully, I disagree with this. Although you are correct that VPS requires a little more knowledge. I would argue that it does not take much more and it is important to learn! If the OP's vision is to host websites then the VPS approach will help with maintenance and backup as well as migrating from one server to another. This is an important thing to know how to do. Given that the OP is learning, what better time to get started.

    For VPS you can look at Hyper-V or even Proxmox as an opensource tool. Most virtual-server environments come with pre-made toaster that have OS and applications already installed. The would cheat your learning though, so it is better to pick the virtual server environment and they install Winows Server 2012.
    ictus==""

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ServerStorm View Post
    Respectfully, I disagree with this. Although you are correct that VPS requires a little more knowledge. I would argue that it does not take much more and it is important to learn! If the OP's vision is to host websites then the VPS approach will help with maintenance and backup as well as migrating from one server to another. This is an important thing to know how to do. Given that the OP is learning, what better time to get started.

    For VPS you can look at Hyper-V or even Proxmox as an opensource tool. Most virtual-server environments come with pre-made toaster that have OS and applications already installed. The would cheat your learning though, so it is better to pick the virtual server environment and they install Winows Server 2012.
    Huh? I think you are misunderstanding the situation. OP should leant OS before learning Hyper-v and vps administration. He can learn OS on a vps, but its backwards for him to learn how to create and manage VPS environment before getting understanding of host server OS


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