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Thread: web designing

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by WebYip View Post
    If you're beginning, I would recommend WordPress. The WordPress Codex is very helpful and complete. Begin by learning HTML and CSS. HTMLdog.com and W3 schools are good places to start. Lynda.com is a great resource, but not free. Javascript should probably be your next stop, with JQuery following. PHP is a server-side language that WP runs on, but to me at least, it's a little more complicated to learn than the rest. WPTuts is a good site. I'd just start bookmarking things you want to know and start building a library. Also find the right people and sites to follow on Twitter; there are always a lot of valuable links being posted by experts there. There aren't any shortcuts, unfortunately. None I've found at least.
    I really appreciate your suggestion...Thanks a lot

  2. #27
    SitePoint Enthusiast gilmeragency's Avatar
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    If you're beginning, I would recommend WordPress. The WordPress Codex is very helpful and complete. Begin by learning HTML and CSS. HTMLdog.com and W3 schools are good places to start. Lynda.com is a great resource, but not free. Javascript should probably be your next stop, with JQuery following. PHP is a server-side language that WP runs on, but to me at least, it's a little more complicated to learn than the rest.
    This is sage advice. I would emphasize HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, first. You may end up being a front-end developer, only. In that case, you would find someone else to do your back-end coding. But when it comes to back-end coding, you could try Coldfusion. CF does the same things that PHP does. And some things it does better. Now, I will be the first to admit that there is far more support for PHP because its free and open-source. But CF is easier to learn for people who are just starting out with back-end coding; and the developer edition is free and does everything you could possibly want to do at this stage in your learning/career. And when you want to publish your web application/site, you just have to find a great ColdFusion host (and there are plenty out there).

    I think, however, that every developer should learn PHP and there is certainly nothing wrong with learning two languages in the long run. It's just that learning CF is an easier entry into back-end coding, while the language itself is every bit as powerful and capable as PHP. But whatever you do, don't get caught up in the senseless debates concerning why one language is better than the other, in general. While certain things are significantly better than others in one language versus the next, the reality is that those things are immaterial until you start building enterprise applications.

    Again, WebYip is right about Lynda.com. Yes, there is a cost to it. But I pay only $37.50 per month and would rather sacrifice other things in order to afford this. Just go to http://www.lynda.com. I would start with their HTML and CSS titles. From there, I would learn Dreamweaver because you really should be using some sort of code editor/IDE (integrated development environment). Afterwards, you should learn JavaScript and JQuery. From there, I would start learning ColdFusion and then definitely PHP. Now depending on how much time you have and how serious you are, you can certainly learn two things at one time (for instance Dreamweaver & HTML/Basic CSS).

    Wordpress? I can see WebYip's point, but I would do this after the other things I mentioned. Wordpress is an excellent technology with an outstanding API; but I don't view it as a "foundation"; at least not for beginning developer.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilmeragency View Post
    This is sage advice. I would emphasize HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, first. You may end up being a front-end developer, only. In that case, you would find someone else to do your back-end coding. But when it comes to back-end coding, you could try Coldfusion. CF does the same things that PHP does. And some things it does better. Now, I will be the first to admit that there is far more support for PHP because its free and open-source. But CF is easier to learn for people who are just starting out with back-end coding; and the developer edition is free and does everything you could possibly want to do at this stage in your learning/career. And when you want to publish your web application/site, you just have to find a great ColdFusion host (and there are plenty out there).

    I think, however, that every developer should learn PHP and there is certainly nothing wrong with learning two languages in the long run. It's just that learning CF is an easier entry into back-end coding, while the language itself is every bit as powerful and capable as PHP. But whatever you do, don't get caught up in the senseless debates concerning why one language is better than the other, in general. While certain things are significantly better than others in one language versus the next, the reality is that those things are immaterial until you start building enterprise applications.

    Again, WebYip is right about Lynda.com. Yes, there is a cost to it. But I pay only $37.50 per month and would rather sacrifice other things in order to afford this. Just go to http://www.lynda.com. I would start with their HTML and CSS titles. From there, I would learn Dreamweaver because you really should be using some sort of code editor/IDE (integrated development environment). Afterwards, you should learn JavaScript and JQuery. From there, I would start learning ColdFusion and then definitely PHP. Now depending on how much time you have and how serious you are, you can certainly learn two things at one time (for instance Dreamweaver & HTML/Basic CSS).

    Wordpress? I can see WebYip's point, but I would do this after the other things I mentioned. Wordpress is an excellent technology with an outstanding API; but I don't view it as a "foundation"; at least not for beginning developer.

    Hope this helps.
    It was amazing..thanks A LOT!!!

  4. #29
    SitePoint Enthusiast gilmeragency's Avatar
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    It was amazing..thanks A LOT!!!
    You are more than welcome. Whatever you do, just stay focused. And don't be afraid to "specialize" at some point. You will succeed!

  5. #30
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    In my point of view Joomla is the best CMS to bild a website & if you are a newbie than WordPress is appropriate to start to build a website.

  6. #31
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    i vote for wordpress. i'm using it to create most of my projects.
    Last edited by spikeZ; Nov 9, 2012 at 03:28. Reason: link removed

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by blueprint design View Post
    i vote for wordpress. i'm using it to create most of my projects.
    Thanks a lot..Is it goos for craeting dynamic websites?

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidken View Post
    Thanks a lot..Is it goos for craeting dynamic websites?
    Yes, that's what it's for—although a specific kind, known as a blog (although it can be used for other purposes).

  9. #34
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    Hi everyone

    I want to know which is the best coding language to design a website.
    Is php is good for designing a secured webpage.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Enthusiast gilmeragency's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveJackson123 View Post
    Hi everyone

    I want to know which is the best coding language to design a website.
    Is php is good for designing a secured webpage.
    Hey Steve,

    Before I answer, how much do you know about the whole process? Have you ever attempted to design a web page/site before? What are you reading/studying right now? The reason I ask is that I don't want to be unnecessary in my answer; but I don't want to assume your knowledge level, either.

    G

  11. #36
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    A beginner? yes you must learn html,css and javascript first then go for corel draw, flash,adobe photoshop etc.much like this stuff i have done in my web designing course so you can start your web designing career with this stuff too.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jessica098 View Post
    A beginner? yes you must learn html,css and javascript first then go for corel draw, flash,adobe photoshop etc.much like this stuff i have done in my web designing course so you can start your web designing career with this stuff too.
    Thanks a lot.

  13. #38
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    I start with Joomla and still using it. Firstly you might find it is very hard, but when you understand the flow then you will be able to understand all. It is easy to manage the layout of your webpage and easy to modify them..HTML understanding is very important, but it worth to try

  14. #39
    SitePoint Member obscend's Avatar
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    Personally, I like concrete5 for basic website development, especially for the client end. If you need more of an "article" style website, go with Wordpress but please, please, keep up with updates and security plugins.
    Inlet Studios - Innovative User Experience Design

  15. #40
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    I'm suggest you to use wordpress because in my opinion that easy using and the theme very beautiful.


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