SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    hyderabad, india
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    which cms is more useful to create web portals

    which software is more useful among joomla and word press for creating a job, matrimony, property portals.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Zealot bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by flourishit View Post
    which software is more useful among joomla and word press for creating a job, matrimony, property portals.
    I think either one of these systems could do that job.

    But Joomla tends to have more extensions that might allow you to do that sort of thing "out of the box." I know of at least a few property plugins that can specifically turn a joomla install in to a property website essentially. These are usually things you have to pay for, but they're not outrageously expensive, and they can save you a lot of development time.

    Drupal might be your best bet if you wanted to create this sort of thing yourself, as a custom job, using various modules and other components. Even have a "Recruiter" distribution, which is essentially a functioning job search portal you can download as a self-contained package. Then again, this would require you to learn Drupal, which is not for the faint of heart.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1. Mambo Open Source
    mamboportal (http://www.mamboportal.com)
    mamboserver (http://www.mamboserver.com)

  4. #4
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,160
    Mentioned
    46 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Drupal and Joomla are all fairly dated content management systems. I'd rate Concrete5 as the best CMS around for PHP at the moment, and Umbraco if you're willing to go .NET. Both would be more than suitable for the kind of site you're trying to build.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Member KeithKarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am only 1.5 years into the CMS game...I am partial to WordPress. But to answer the question, It just comes down to what you like. They all do the same function. I understand that WordPress is more of the entry point and Joomla is the next step, then Drupal.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Member ErvinJackal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I read all the information, but i am a content writer and have a website. Which CMS is best for me? Some say wordpress is the best (which i currently have) while others say Php(may be i am not that technically skilled so accept errors) is better. Give me some idea on this, one of my friend say static site is the best and he said wordpress sites will not rank well on Google when compared to static(like, links ending with ".html")
    Pls friends accept errors on this for i am not a developer like you all.

  7. #7
    SitePoint Enthusiast Brocberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    England
    Posts
    99
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    Drupal and Joomla are all fairly dated content management systems. I'd rate Concrete5 as the best CMS around for PHP at the moment, and Umbraco if you're willing to go .NET. Both would be more than suitable for the kind of site you're trying to build.
    Why is Drupal dated in your opinion? I'm not saying you're wrong, just interested.

  8. #8
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,160
    Mentioned
    46 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brocberry View Post
    Why is Drupal dated in your opinion? I'm not saying you're wrong, just interested.
    I believe it to be dated because it's been around for a long time, and because in general good PHP CMS's have been very hard to come by.

    The whole CMS space is something that PHP seems to have struggled with for some time compared to the likes of ASP.NET. It may be due to its open source roots, but the low barrier to entry for PHP has helped three scripts dominate that space (Joomla, Drupal and WordPress). Both Joomla and Drupal have been around for a long time and have reputations as bloated and complex beasts, which is in stark comparison to what ASP.NET has been able to offer enterprise and high-traffic sites with Umbraco and Sitecore. This low barrier to entry has allowed those three to thrive and over time they've become more bloated and the code bases messier.

    Thankfully, over time PHP's faults as a language have been noted, especially with the arrival of C# and ASP.NET, and more notably the likes of Ruby on Rails and Python into mainstream web use. This has allowed the state of PHP to improve and for new solutions to find their way into mainstream use.

    The reason why I push Concrete5 so much is because it is still relatively unknown by those that are used to older CMS's. If the average PHP user were to come on here they'd believe that the best CMS for PHP is WordPress and that for heavier jobs there is only Drupal or Joomla. In reality the likes of Concrete5 and others surpassed WordPress a long time ago.

    Drupal is still a decent CMS, but it's been around for a while and has a reputation as being quite hard to handle. I wouldn't recommend it unless there was a specific use-case where a newer, lighter CMS wasn't a viable option.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Zealot bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    The whole CMS space is something that PHP seems to have struggled with for some time compared to the likes of ASP.NET. It may be due to its open source roots, but the low barrier to entry for PHP has helped three scripts dominate that space (Joomla, Drupal and WordPress). .........

    Drupal is still a decent CMS, but it's been around for a while and has a reputation as being quite hard to handle. I wouldn't recommend it unless there was a specific use-case where a newer, lighter CMS wasn't a viable option.
    I couldn't agree with you any more on most of your points.

    I believe the asp.net CMS's had their advantage due to the fact that they had strong and well-established web frameworks in place that they were able to build on top of.

    In certain respects, ExpressionEngine (PHP based) has enjoyed some of that. Concrete5, while not actually based on an established framework -- it still uses a lot of the same MVC principles you'll see in something like Ruby on Rails. And very, very loosely inspired by the likes of the .net framework.

    Now that Drupal are getting on board with that for Drupal8 (Symfony framework), I think you'll see a very rapid move in to the modern age for them, come drupal8 or 9. Here is a look at their new content authoring/management interface called "Spark." I don't think you can argue that the content authoring/editing platform has evolved by light years with this release:

    http://www.sparkdrupal.com/

  10. #10
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    I've been sitting here playing around with the concrete5 admin for about an hour. Even read the Drupal switch guide. Still not really impressed. Seems rather primitive though new. Than again I'm comparing it to Drupal which has been around for nearly a decade and has a huge development community. Probably not a fair comparison. Either way I don't think there is any comparison given all contributed modules available: drush, cck (fields), views, panels, imagecache (image styles), web forms, etc. I mean get what concrete5 is trying to do but it is no were near as powerful. At least in terms of achieving end business goals without programming. Being newer concrete5 is probably programmed much better but most of the top Drupal modules have been vetted over and over. So I think it is safe to say they are pretty stable at this point. Besides Drupal 8 is going to integrate several Symfony components. So they are always looking for ways to make the system better.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  11. #11
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CMS Dude View Post
    I couldn't agree with you any more on most of your points.

    I believe the asp.net CMS's had their advantage due to the fact that they had strong and well-established web frameworks in place that they were able to build on top of.

    In certain respects, ExpressionEngine (PHP based) has enjoyed some of that. Concrete5, while not actually based on an established framework -- it still uses a lot of the same MVC principles you'll see in something like Ruby on Rails. And very, very loosely inspired by the likes of the .net framework.

    Now that Drupal are getting on board with that for Drupal8 (Symfony framework), I think you'll see a very rapid move in to the modern age for them, come drupal8 or 9. Here is a look at their new content authoring/management interface called "Spark." I don't think you can argue that the content authoring/editing platform has evolved by light years with this release:

    http://www.sparkdrupal.com/
    Haven't seen spark yet. That is pretty nifty.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  12. #12
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,160
    Mentioned
    46 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by oddz View Post
    I've been sitting here playing around with the concrete5 admin for about an hour. Even read the Drupal switch guide. Still not really impressed. Seems rather primitive though new. Than again I'm comparing it to Drupal which has been around for nearly a decade and has a huge development community. Probably not a fair comparison. Either way I don't think there is any comparison given all contributed modules available: drush, cck (fields), views, panels, imagecache (image styles), web forms, etc. I mean get what concrete5 is trying to do but it is no were near as powerful. At least in terms of achieving end business goals without programming. Being newer concrete5 is probably programmed much better but most of the top Drupal modules have been vetted over and over. So I think it is safe to say they are pretty stable at this point. Besides Drupal 8 is going to integrate several Symfony components. So they are always looking for ways to make the system better.
    Does having more features make a CMS more powerful? I might be alone in this, but I want my CMS to be as lightweight as possible so I can build my website around it, rather than have to rely on modifying third-party code to accomplish anything.

    The reason why so many of these CMS's are thriving, and a reason why the likes of WordPress and Drupal have such huge communities is because the product becomes reliant on a community because it sells itself on its features. Hell, SitePoint went as far as to merge WordPress in with this forum because so many people need to use it as a CMS because they are either too inexperienced to build their site or cannot use a different CMS. WordPress has its market, and it is non-developers, Drupal is the developers choice, but can be hard to wield if you're trying to go against the grain of what Drupal can do.

    Drupal 8 will do things right by merging itself with an established framework in Symfony, and I'm glad to see that PHP is finally catching up to where RoR, ASP.NET and Python have been for the best part of five years. However, there will still be non-developers that will flock to Drupal and WordPress, and they will continue to thrive through the requirement of community. Concrete5 will continue to grow, but in quality.

  13. #13
    SitePoint Zealot bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    Does having more features make a CMS more powerful? I might be alone in this, but I want my CMS to be as lightweight as possible so I can build my website around it, rather than have to rely on modifying third-party code to accomplish anything.
    I would say you're right on both counts. In an ideal world, you use something stripped down for the simpler stuff, and the one with more features for the heavier lifting.

    Silverstripe is my CMS of choice, but I would be a fool to spend several days developing some functionality for it ... that has already been written, tested and vetted in Drupal. Similarly, I would be going way overboard making a simple, static blog or portfolio page with Drupal.

  14. #14
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    Does having more features make a CMS more powerful? I might be alone in this, but I want my CMS to be as lightweight as possible so I can build my website around it, rather than have to rely on modifying third-party code to accomplish anything.

    The reason why so many of these CMS's are thriving, and a reason why the likes of WordPress and Drupal have such huge communities is because the product becomes reliant on a community because it sells itself on its features. Hell, SitePoint went as far as to merge WordPress in with this forum because so many people need to use it as a CMS because they are either too inexperienced to build their site or cannot use a different CMS. WordPress has its market, and it is non-developers, Drupal is the developers choice, but can be hard to wield if you're trying to go against the grain of what Drupal can do.

    Drupal 8 will do things right by merging itself with an established framework in Symfony, and I'm glad to see that PHP is finally catching up to where RoR, ASP.NET and Python have been for the best part of five years. However, there will still be non-developers that will flock to Drupal and WordPress, and they will continue to thrive through the requirement of community. Concrete5 will continue to grow, but in quality.
    You make good points. I think part of my response was due to having worked with Drupal exclusively for 2 years now. If I'm going to spend time learning something I might as well be improving my skills with what I work with day in and day out. Ask me two years back about Drupal and I would probably have more of a distaste for it than you do. I don't know if it is me getting soft but it really has much to offer in regards to the community that supports it. That is if you can get over the many flaws and understand the consequences negative and positive of different contributed modules. One thing I have always hated about it like you is that it is not MVC. Again though I don't really think it needs to be. The power of Drupal lyes in the hook system. Which is essentially nothing more than an event.

    I'm following 8 closely and it looks like they are actually planning on implementing an actual event driven paradigm using Symfony components. A little early to tell though. I know the one thing that has been nearly completed is the Symfony routing component integration. I think there is even plans to use doctrine. One thing I have to say about Drupal is although it has it's problems the core team is not afraid to improve the system even if it means fundamental architecture changes that have a far reaching impact on contributed modules that might rely on a different implementation. That works well for improving the system but not so well for people using those modules. Good thing and bad thing in many ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by CMS Dude
    I would say you're right on both counts. In an ideal world, you use something stripped down for the simpler stuff, and the one with more features for the heavier lifting.

    Silverstripe is my CMS of choice, but I would be a fool to spend several days developing some functionality for it ... that has already been written, tested and vetted in Drupal. Similarly, I would be going way overboard making a simple, static blog or portfolio page with Drupal.
    I work for a large media company, not freelance. Software is always evolving and it is very difficult to say no to anything unless it is just out right stupid. Though even some outright stupid ideas get implemented. Drupal is flexible enough to meet the requirements of evolving software in a somewhat efficient manor.

    That said if it was up to me I probably would have never used Drupal in the first place. Our system is not very stable at this point because of all the cruft people have added over time. The best Drupal site is really one that can be monitored and restricted in terms of installing modules. Though once you have over 200 modules things become very difficult to maintain. That isn't a fault of Drupal though. It is more so the evolution of the system that people did not expect 3+ years.

    The worst thing to deal with is none-developers installing modules. if I ever took on a freelance project I would lock down all that stuff. I would probably even lock down panels, views, fields and images. People who don't understand consequences of changing structure of the site can do some terrible damage if they allowed to manage structural components through the UI.

    I will admit though it has been very difficult to let go of control. With a framework like Silex or even Symfony there are so many less dependencies. However, with Drupal it is a sea of powerful code core and contributed, written by many different people and it would take aeons to understand it all in and out.

    Off Topic:


    Man… I kinda sound like Drupal fan boy and I'm really not. It has it's advantages just as it has disadvantages.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  15. #15
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    To be completely hontest I feel like Concrete5 would be nearly as difficult for someone to pick-up as Drupal. At least in terms of understanding the Admin interface. it is very similar to MODX, Expression Engine, Joomla and Drupal in terms of representing programmatic concepts rather than business concepts. I think just about all those have a similar GUI learning curve inherit flaw to the generic nature of the software.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  16. #16
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    Man, I have spent a couple of hours playing around with spark and watching the videos. Very very revolutionary stuff on the CMS land scape. I'm very impressed and look forward to an actual release. Though I know other CMS systems have in place editing but the mobile admin and responsive panels puts it in a league all of its own. With Symfony integration and all these neat little things being considered for core by the time d8 arrives I might just be a huge fan.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •