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  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard Pedro Monteiro's Avatar
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    What Version control software do you use?

    Looking for a very slick version control system for Linux. I tried
    TortoiseSVN and the progress there is quite amazing, but its still not as slick from a GUI end as it could be.

    Does anyone have any recommendation, paid or free?

  2. #2
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    git.
    also mercurial is good, but I use git anyway.

    And absolutely NOT svn.

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    You can use CVS.

  4. #4
    Utopia, Inc. silver trophy
    ScallioXTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fileppoa View Post
    You can use CVS.
    Yikes, retro much?

    As far as versioning tools go, just use git or hg on the command line. Takes some getting used to, but after a while that really pays off. Simply because it's so much more flexible than any GUI out there.

    If you want some visual representation of what's happening there are always tools like gitk.

    I used to work with TortoiseSVN on windows and did not really like it (partly because SVN as a protocol just sucks, partly because of some idiosyncrosies in the GUI). Now I'm working with git on the command line and absolutely love it!

    Just make sure to create some aliases to make it easier. Like "st" for "status" etc.

    And indeed, git is simpler than you think
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  5. #5
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    there are many good version control systems out there. git, svn, and team foundation server are all very nice. personally i like git for its versatility. and i use it for all my personal and open-source projects. at work, we use dynamsoft sourceanywhere. although we mainly use it with visual studio, the vendor claims that the software has Java GUI clients, too

  6. #6
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    perforce and git.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  7. #7
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
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    I use Subversion and (occasionally) Mercurial at work, and Git for anything personal.

    TortoiseSVN is still by far the most usable GUI solution, with TortoiseHg coming a fairly distant second. Git support is so bad on Windows that whatever command line solution you come up with will be infinitely better.

    It's a shame really, because Mercurial is a million miles in front of Git on Windows. A great GUI for either of them would be a game changer in the same way that Github was a game changer for DVCS.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy Jeff Mott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    TortoiseSVN is still by far the most usable GUI solution.... Git [GUI] support is so bad on Windows that whatever command line solution you come up with will be infinitely better.
    Agreed. In fact, that's the reason I haven't adopted Git yet. I prefer using GUIs over the command line, and the Git GUIs are incredibly frustrating to use.
    "First make it work. Then make it better."

  9. #9
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
    wwb_99's Avatar
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    Most of the newer and more active stuff is in HG these days. We've got alot of stuff still kicking around in SVN, and we use it for some deployment stuff that you just couldn't do with a DCVS. We are using Git here and there, principally in places where we've got external Git to deal with (eg -- wordpress core) or for environments that have heavy git integration (read: xcode / iOS).

    I'm pretty happy with current versions of TortiseHG -- definitely miles ahead of anything on windows for Git. In many ways I find it superior to tortsieSVN. What are your issues with it?

    PS: I haven't tried it, but I heard Github for Windows is pretty awesome if you need a Github / Git install for Windows.

  10. #10
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wwb_99 View Post
    We've got alot of stuff still kicking around in SVN, and we use it for some deployment stuff that you just couldn't do with a DCVS.
    Out of interest, what couldn't you do? I assume that as a part of your workflow you are using one "origin" repository?

    Quote Originally Posted by wwb_99 View Post
    I'm pretty happy with current versions of TortiseHG -- definitely miles ahead of anything on windows for Git. In many ways I find it superior to tortsieSVN. What are your issues with it?
    TortoiseSVN is polished to the point where I now rarely touch the command line unless I'm using Linux at home. TortoiseHg is good, but it still doesn't feel as usable as TortoiseSVN, especially when branching and committing.

    Quote Originally Posted by wwb_99 View Post
    PS: I haven't tried it, but I heard Github for Windows is pretty awesome if you need a Github / Git install for Windows.
    I've always liked GitHub as a company, and their app looks fantastic. As a C# programmer I was very interested in reading how they built the tool, but I am still yet to use it as I'm not a big fan of having my code out in the open (which is why I use BitBucket for personal stuff).

    Also, and I know this sounds a bit crazy, but when a developer tool looks THAT nice I get concerned about whether it'll actually work.

  11. #11
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
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    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    Out of interest, what couldn't you do? I assume that as a part of your workflow you are using one "origin" repository?
    SVN essentially lets you version filesystem trees. And it will let you version disparate filesystem trees in the same repository. We've got alot of deployment bits we have handled through SVN with different parts of trees on different servers, etc. I'm starting to get to a point with DCVS systems where I can see some correct ways to model this, but there are still some stunts that you can only do with SVN.

    Another angle is security -- some of these devices are pretty close to the edge. With DCVSes your entire repo history is there for the taking. And, if you are on a cloud provider where you are paying for space and backup, them DCVS repos get pretty hefty.

    Final angle is some file size issues. We've got a few old projects with some large binaries in SVN. Since SVN is onsite, this is managable. We have tried to import these things into HG a few times and it has always crashed and burned due to some of the large files timing out the network. I probably could get it to work over ssh, but that is not something we want to take on.

    TortoiseSVN is polished to the point where I now rarely touch the command line unless I'm using Linux at home. TortoiseHg is good, but it still doesn't feel as usable as TortoiseSVN, especially when branching and committing.
    Funny, I think the branching / merging / committing parts of TortiseHG shine compared to TortiseSVN. Parts that I think need help are some code merging dialogs and the shelving stuff. The other trick is updating -- it isn't as in your face about it so I do it less often than I would TortiseSVN. But they are making major gains in every version.

    I've always liked GitHub as a company, and their app looks fantastic. As a C# programmer I was very interested in reading how they built the tool, but I am still yet to use it as I'm not a big fan of having my code out in the open (which is why I use BitBucket for personal stuff).

    Also, and I know this sounds a bit crazy, but when a developer tool looks THAT nice I get concerned about whether it'll actually work.
    I think it was a land grab towards those impressed by pretty. And also aimed at how bad a story that git is on windows. Too bad those guys are so totally sold on git, really no reason they could not offer HG as well -- logical model is similar enough that all the tools should be able to work with it.

  12. #12
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
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    A good post that has recently made the rounds about Git that could be relevant to this discussion. I've certainly had times when playing with Git where I've completely ruined a project and had to start my repo from fresh because I didn't understand Git.

    https://steveko.wordpress.com/2012/0...ate-about-git/

  13. #13
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    cpradio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro Monteiro View Post
    Looking for a very slick version control system for Linux. I tried
    TortoiseSVN and the progress there is quite amazing, but its still not as slick from a GUI end as it could be.

    Does anyone have any recommendation, paid or free?
    What desktop environment are you running on Linux? If KDE, kdesvn is really good and simple to use. You can also get SVN support packaged in IDEs such as sublime_text2 and phpstorm

  14. #14
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    you can use CVS. There are many good version control systems out there. but this server is good.

  15. #15
    padawan silver trophybronze trophy markbrown4's Avatar
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    I use git for everything. Command line for 95% of it, and Tower for a GUI occasionally.

  16. #16
    Life is not a malfunction gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
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    As the OP has not returned to this thread since April, there seems little point in resurrecting it now.

    Thread closed.


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