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  1. #1
    Bah, I'll just hack it DoobyWho's Avatar
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    Help! Need input!!

    Help! I've got to write up a document about why we shouldn't migrate a clients website that uses a server with MySQL to a MS SQL server. Some things i've already pointed out are the fact that we'd have to rewrite some of the scripts on the website because MySQL syntax differs from SQL syntax slightly. Anything else that is a CON of moving over?

  2. #2
    Web-coding NINJA! silver trophy beetle's Avatar
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    Uh, isn't the MS SQL server license like $2k per site?
    beetle a.k.a. Peter Bailey
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  3. #3
    Bah, I'll just hack it DoobyWho's Avatar
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    The thing is, the client already has the SQL server in their office. Heres the situation...

    They have an Access database that they use there in the office and it pulls/updates information on the server that we host their website on that has MySQL on it. The website pulls the content from the MySQL database dynamically and they can edit the MySQL content via ODBC via MS Access. They want to move the information from the MySQL database over to the SQL database and have the website/access pull from that instead.

  4. #4
    \m/ R.I.P. Dimebag! \m/ JimBolla's Avatar
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    If you already own a sql server license than i think the only downside is the little bit of work it may take initially to port over the database and to change any minor syntactical differences.
    -- JIM BOLLA
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  5. #5
    SQL Consultant gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
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    dooby, i'd be interested to know what arguments against it you already had, such that you were asked "to write up a document about why we shouldn't"

    if the client has sql/server in their office, how do they plan to connect that to their web site? would they have to switch hosting companies?

    oh, i see now

    sorry

  6. #6
    Currently Occupied; Till Sunda Andrew-J2000's Avatar
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    I have one reason, mysql cost me two thousand pound because it became corrupt when demonstrating a project to a client. Ms Sql server, can handle far more concurrent users and supports transactions. I you would like more information then pm me as i have a report that i started to write a while back, about the differences between msde and sql server.

    Also there are plenty of white papers at microsoft

    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/default.asp

  7. #7
    Bah, I'll just hack it DoobyWho's Avatar
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    No see. They want reasons to use MySQL, not MS SQL Server

  8. #8
    Currently Occupied; Till Sunda Andrew-J2000's Avatar
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    First one is that it is free to test on. Any way it would be best if i point you in the direction of some relevant articles.

    http://www.mysql.com/support/index.html
    http://www.mysql.com/information/crash-me.php
    http://www.mysql.com/information/benchmarks.html
    http://www.nusphere.com/products/access2mysql.pdf
    http://builder.com.com/article.jhtml...20523dol01.htm
    http://builder.com.com/article.jhtml...m&page=1&vf=tt (you can still keep ms as the front end)

    http://www.mysql.com/press/user_stories/index.html (this might be worth looking at)

    Pricing

    http://www.mysql.com/support/arrangements/price.html


    Introduction to MySQL
    MySQL (pronounced'my-S-Q-L') is a robust, multi-threaded database server, which also offers a set of client utilities and programs. In popular client/server architecture, MySQL allows multiple user connections and is supported by Structured Query Language (SQL), an industry standard fourth generation language used for interacting with data stored RDBMS. MySQL is a viable, cost-effective alternative to leading RDBMS.

    Originally developed by Michael Widenius of TcX, Sweden, MySQL entered the Open-Source code movement in 1995 with the Internet release of MySQL 1.0. Thereafter, MySQL has been an evolving database platform, fueled by a hard-core group of volunteer programmers from around the world. Currently, MySQL has reached version 3.22.32.

    MySQL runs on a multi-threaded database engine. This means that MySQL can handle many tasks and requests at the same time--clients connecting to a MySQL database server do not need to wait for other clients' queries or processes to end before their requests are executed. This rapid response is accomplished through the use of a multi-threaded program, which acts as if many instances of the same program are running concurrently. When a user connects to the MySQL database server, a new application process, called a thread, handles the work requested by that connection. At any given time, an extra thread is always running to manage the requests of other threads. If a connection is calling for access to a table already engaged in another connection's process, the managing thread will force the calling connection to wait until the other process has completed. Since individual threads execute independent of each other, multi-processor machines can be used to distribute the thread workload across several CPUs. MySQL runs as a daemon just like any other process in the UNIX environment. Once up and running, the MySQL daemon replicates itself and runs as a background process. The MySQL server daemon is called 'mysqld.' It can be started by running the mysqld or safe_mysqld scripts.

    As this section served as an introduction to MySQL, the following section will discuss database security and grant tables.



    Database Security

    For database administrators, security ranks as a top concern. Obviously, server and database access must be blocked to unauthorized users, but one will also want to consider protecting data from authorized users. Authorized users can potentially damaged data accidentally or maliciously. Database users can issue SQL statements against the database and delete or alter data.

    The MySQL security system is referred to as the Access Privilege System. It is the process that authenticates and verifies all user activity on the MySQL server and in its databases. Before discussing how the Access Privilege System functions, we need to learn about the component parts of the system.

    The fundamental concept in understanding the MySQL security system is that security is applied at two levels: the server and the database. When a user tries to access a database, that user must first have access privileges to the database server. (Remember that all the databases exist on the MySQL server.) MySQL verifies that the user has connection rights to the server before the user can request to use a database that exists on the server. Server connection verification and database request verification are the two processes MySQL always goes through to allow user access to a database.

    MySQL runs both server and database verification against system tables known as grant tables. These tables contain all the information needed to apply security. All hosts (other computers) and users that connect to MySQL server must be represented in the grant tables.
    Even if it means altering your code slightly, they both use the standard sql ansi with propriety statements as well. But either way I would jump at the chance to port it all to sql server.

    Besides all this, server-side languages work better in different situations with different databases. So, are you currently using php/mySQL
    Last edited by Andrew-J2000; Nov 1, 2002 at 09:39.


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