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  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard
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    Illustrator 10 - drawing smooth lines

    Please see attachment -- how can this be made smooth?

    Simply opened a new document and applied the pencil tool.

    Viewing this kinda makes it look like it's being seen on a non-interlaced moniter.
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  2. #2
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    You might find that it would print smooth and just looks jagged on screen, but I'm not sure. A better way to draw such a line would be with the pen tool, though—drawing a bezier curve.

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    Yes, I think it's just your screen. if you zoom in, you will the that the LEVEL of jagginess does not increase... if this was raster artwork the blocks would get bigger. So have have faith. Chances are that this is a display error similar to hat happens in Photoshop when you create a vector shape but it doesn't align perfectly to the pixel grid. Nothing to worry about unless you plan to slice for web directly out of AI!?!

  4. #4
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    molona's Avatar
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    I agree with the above but if you want to create the smoothest curves in the world simply use tangent lines. That is, the curve points should be on the extremes of the curve and no points at all in the curve itself.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralph.m View Post
    You might find that it would print smooth and just looks jagged on screen, but I'm not sure. A better way to draw such a line would be with the pen tool, though—drawing a bezier curve.
    Started playing with the pen tool/bezier curve and like it! Should be able to get the right extended radius, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by malona View Post
    I agree with the above but if you want to create the smoothest curves in the world simply use tangent lines. That is, the curve points should be on the extremes of the curve and no points at all in the curve itself.
    Could you please explain how this might be done - not familiar with tangent lines ~ curve points?

    Here I thought someone was going to suggest rastering. Or corroborate it not being the monitor.

    This is sort of important since it forms part of a logo design.

    - Appreciate the concise, helpful thoughts.

    - Also, wasn't aware that each image upload now has to be reviewed prior to posting -- so I'll use this privilege with economy.

  6. #6
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    molona's Avatar
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    I'm posting a little example that it may make it easier for you to understand. In all the cases the handlers are tangent to the curve (they always are, by definition) so it may look that everything is OK. But in the graphic on the top some curve points are in the curve itself where in the bottom ones there is no points in it. The results are the same but curves are likely to be smoother in the bottom examples because you will be using less points.

    Using the right number of points (no more , no less) is also helpful in complex graphics. If you use to many points, you may have a memory problem and therefore your computer may take loads to render the graphic. So getting used to create graphics with the lowest number of points is a good practice. You don't need to become obsessed though

    Since I can approve my own pictures, you will see it immediately Aren't I cool *flicks hair*
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  7. #7
    Non-Member imranrobin's Avatar
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    For drawing a smooth line Photoshop i better than Illustrator. To make a good path on Illustrator is difficult than Photoshop.

  8. #8
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    molona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by imranrobin View Post
    For drawing a smooth line Photoshop i better than Illustrator. To make a good path on Illustrator is difficult than Photoshop.
    You should stick to what you know best, of course. But Illustrator specializes in vector whereas photoshop is a raster specialist. When you draw a vector in Photoshop and then give it a color/width, Photoshop shows your the raster result which pixelates. For Illustrator is just a math formula and that's why quality is always the same. It simply recalculates the formula to get the correct size when you escalate the shape. And for this reason you use Illustrator to create logos which need to have the same quality no matter if they will printed to cover a building, or if they will be printed in something as small as a pen.

  9. #9
    Non-Member imranrobin's Avatar
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    Hello molona,
    Thanks for your nice reply and advice. If say for Logo design and vector then it is correct that Illustrator is good. But if you want to draw a path very fast and make it clipping then you have to need Photoshop. When we do a vector design then at first we have do path in Photoshop. Then we replace the path in illustrator and make a vector design. By illustrator we get a solid color than can't be noise. But when we large Zoom in an image in Photoshop then color be noisy.

  10. #10
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    molona's Avatar
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    I insist, you should use what suit you best. Even if Illustrator is better with vectors, Photoshop can do the job too and if that's what you know, stick to that.

    As much as we loved to, sometimes there's no time to learn something new even if we know that it will be better in the end.

  11. #11
    Non-Member imranrobin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona View Post
    I insist, you should use what suit you best. Even if Illustrator is better with vectors, Photoshop can do the job too and if that's what you know, stick to that.

    As much as we loved to, sometimes there's no time to learn something new even if we know that it will be better in the end.
    Thank you so much for your nice cooperation.

  12. #12
    Mazel tov! bronze trophy kohoutek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by imranrobin View Post
    Hello molona,
    Thanks for your nice reply and advice. If say for Logo design and vector then it is correct that Illustrator is good. But if you want to draw a path very fast and make it clipping then you have to need Photoshop. When we do a vector design then at first we have do path in Photoshop. Then we replace the path in illustrator and make a vector design. By illustrator we get a solid color than can't be noise. But when we large Zoom in an image in Photoshop then color be noisy.
    It's not all that important to use vector for a logo exclusively used on the web as it's a one-off sized image with fixed metrics. For print it's important, but for the web, you can technically do the job in a raster application.

    Also, you don't have to draw outlines with the pen in Photoshop first, you can do that in Illustrator right away. Most people I know do it the other way around; paper and pencil > vector drawing > special treatment in Photoshop (if at all needed as Illustrator itself has almost everything one could want).
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