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  1. #1
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    Question Related to ASP Popularity?

    My question is based on ASP technology, is ASP still popular among web developers, and if i want to develop
    databases website then should ASP full fill the demands.

    Waiting for ASP developers suggestions.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
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    I like ASP but unfortunately it is somewhat antiquated. Microsoft stopped supporting the technology more than 10 years ago. It still works as well as it did 10 or 12 years ago but other technologies have grown in leaps and bounds since then. If you are a beginner programmer, you can't do any harm by learning ASP but for new projects I would look to ASP.NET or PHP.
    Andrew Wasson | www.lunadesign.org
    Principal / Internet Development

  3. #3
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    Classic ASP is a matured web development platform... and I myself created Cloud Computing Solutions (including banking sector) using such platform. It works well for me because it does not burden the web server (ASP.NET adds 4++MB running in background) so much. For me, using a minimum hardware requirement.... I will go for classic ASP.

    PHP is also a good alternative, BUT if you are deploying your online solutions using Windows Operating Systems, then better utilize IIS Web server rather than simulated Apache (or other non-Windows Webservers). Just like drinking coffee in McDonalds... instead of Starbucks.

    Just my two cents

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard siteguru's Avatar
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    At some point Microsoft may remove ASP support from IIS. Indeed (I think) ASP is not configured "out of the box" - it needs to be enabled in IIS.

    For someone starting out I'd recommend .NET or PHP - time for ASP to die gracefully methinks.

    (But yes, I also do like ASPs simplicity).
    Ian Anderson
    www.siteguru.co.uk

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
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    That's true siteguru. I think it was disabled starting with Server 2003. Most of the IIS IT guys I've run into in the past 5 years or so didn't know how to configure IIS for ASP so I had to walk them through it. I like its simplicity and small memory footprint but with all the extended features of PHP5.x or Dot.NET, I'm not starting any new projects with ASP Classic. I still maintain one big ASP project but we'll be moving it to PHP/MySQL in the next 12 months.
    Andrew Wasson | www.lunadesign.org
    Principal / Internet Development

  6. #6
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    Classic asp is not dead, but many web developers say it's dead. Many kids like Justing Bieber. Do you like Justin Bieber?

    I am sure classic ASP gonna live for at least another decade, and it will be included in Windows 8 machines. See http://forums.iis.net/t/1187679.aspx.

    So there is not a single reason to believe classic ASP will no longer be supported by Microsoft in the coming 10 years. We're 2012 now... By then I will be retiring

  7. #7
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    Here's a reason.... Windows 64 bit servers don't like ASP Classic which means web hosts will either not be providing it or that your ASP Classic site will be hanging out on old hardware while the ASP.NET, PHP, JSP, CFM sites will all be migrated to shiny new fast hardware.

    I'll always have a soft spot for ASP Classic because I really started to "get" programming when I started writing Visual Basic 3 apps and ASP inherits a great deal from good old Visual Basic but ASP hasn't been supported form more than 10 years and is quite limited compared to other technologies that have evolved greatly in that time. I've got one last big site on ASP Classic and I'm actively moving it before it becomes too difficult to support.
    Andrew Wasson | www.lunadesign.org
    Principal / Internet Development

  8. #8
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    I have installed ASP sites on at least a dozen of virtual and dedicated Windows 2008 64 bit Servers. You *just* have to enable 32 bits applications for the application pools in IIS 7.5 in case you run Access databases. MS has decided to not rewrite the oledb data readers and writers for 64 bit systems. But again, you can enable 32 bit applications rather easily.

    I use QuickerSite (www.quickersite.com), and my sites are on both Windows 2000, 2003, 2008 servers, both 32 and 64 bits. Both shared, virtual and dedicated hosting. I have never seen issues with any version of IIS (5,6,7) so far. Classic ASP is even supported in Webmatrix, a pretty new and exciting IDE by MS: http://www.microsoft.com/web/webmatrix/.

    However, you're absolutely right: there are better technologies today. I would recommend PHP/MySQL, because you can rely on very powerful open source applications to build a business.

  9. #9
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    I've just got that one big ASP/SQL Server site left. All the others have been converted to ASP.NET/SQL Server or PHP/MySQL. The last one is pretty large with a custom CRM backend for members to track their professional continuing education, exams and work experience (for interns). It is quite awesome and it's probably my finest bit of application design. It's been running for the better part of 10 years and we've expanded it over the years as my client has desired more features.

    The host has been making noises about upgrading to new servers but not for that site because of the 64-bit/32-bit issue so that's prompted us to do the big upgrade to a PHP/MySQL solution built on a Drupal/civiCRM platform. It's actually been pretty smooth so far but now I have to export all of the member info from the old site and import it into the new CRM. Then I have to recreate the various rosters and search widgets. It'll be a much easier site to extend on the new platform.

    it's too bad that ASP.NET was such a departure to ASP Classic. PHP is a much more relate-able web tech for someone moving from Classic ASP whereas ASP.NET is more like a Java, C++, Ruby, etc...

    I'll always have an instance of IIS running though so I can test out things and help out in the ASP forum
    Andrew Wasson | www.lunadesign.org
    Principal / Internet Development

  10. #10
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    With classic ASP success, I dont think Microsoft will abandon it (with the inclusion in Windows 8). It will be maintained as part of IIS... one of the success platform Microsoft has. Up to now it surprises me that "new" classic ASP codes are still being deployed with association of COM+ (dlls) generated from other languages. COM wrappers acts purely as code-behind which is similar to ASP.NET \bin\Dlls.

    The only difference is the way devtool manages these codes. ASP.NET has advantages on this side of the argument because it uses a single devtool (Visual Studio) unlike a third party compiler creating COM+ wrappers.

    BUT the topic refers to classic ASP popularity and not emerging new technologies (ASP.NET/Php/Perl). With it comes to classic ASP... functionality wise it is still popular.

  11. #11
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    I'd say Microsoft has abandoned it, but they aren't forcibly pulling the rug out from under folks. Big challenge is that you can't get 32 bit servers anymore and lots of the backing libraries one needs with ASP are 32 bit without 64 bit upgrade paths.

    If you love the classic ASP / PHP style model and want to move up in the microsoft stack, check out ASP.NET web pages -- they behave remarkably similarly and shine in the same ways while not being held back by COM roots.

  12. #12
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    I still don't get the 32 vs 64 issues. You can run ASP sites on Windows 2008 64 bit Servers and simply configure the application pools to enable 32 bits applications. That really solves basically every problem. If in the Windows 8 release that option would disappear, we will no longer be able to install ASP applications running on Access databases for instance, or use other components that are not available in 64 bit.

    What I like about classic ASP, is that I can create applications that work fine on both Windows 2000, 2003, 2008 and probably 8 servers. And I can use any Windows shared hosting plan as well. That is major "selling point" I think.

    As soon as I am able to test drive Windows 8 and IIS 8 I will report back. Does anyone have a server running Windows 8?

  13. #13
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    I am running it (ASP applications plus COM+ wrappers) under Windows Server 2008 R2 and it works well. My COMponents (DLLs) are installed manually using the Component Services Management Tool.
    Last edited by infoRene; Apr 14, 2012 at 02:44. Reason: additional information


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