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View Poll Results: Can mySQL handle a large e-commerce site's demands?

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  • Yes

    3 60.00%
  • No

    2 40.00%
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  1. #1
    SitePoint Evangelist worksdev's Avatar
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    mySQL for E-commerce?

    Can mySQL handle a large e-commerce site?

    I’m getting ready to build an e-commerce site that will eventually handle a lot of transactions and serve up a lot of dynamic pages to a lot of visitors/users. No. I don’t really have a defined amount for “a lot”. Maybe a guru could suggest a potential limit on mySQLs abilities.

    Previously, I have built sites like this with Microsoft technologies, but I’d like to use open-source for this (as I’ve really grown to love open-source technologies in the past year). So I am thinking a PHP/mySQL solution ran with Apache on a Linux based server. Will it be scalable enough? Is anybody able to suggest where the limit might be?

  2. #2
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    Without massive optimization, constant tinkering, dual machines, and a lot of your time, MySQL can only handle 500-600 concurrent users. With the above you can double that. If your idea of a lot means that you will have more users than that then you need to look at a better solution.

    You might be able to increase the number of users if you use INNODB tables instead of the featureless MYISAM tables. This will get you row level locking and rudimentary transaction (atomic updates) capability. In version 4.X which is due out sometime this winter as a final release, you can use fulltext searching as it will give added abilities in that area to make it worth while whereas fulltext searching in MySQL 3.XX is problematic and slow.

    If you absolutely have to have reliability, redundancy and the advanced features that most N-Tier and scalable applications need then look elsewhere. If you need Open Source, then look at Postgre SQL as it appears a lot more scalable and robust. It also has the features you are used to like triggers, stored procedures and transactions native to its tables. If you can use a commercial system you might look into Sybase or the big boys of MS-SQL and Oracle.
    Wayne Luke
    ------------


  3. #3
    SitePoint Evangelist worksdev's Avatar
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    Thanks Wayne.

    That pretty much answers the question. I guess I'll probably go back to MS-SQL.

    Best Regards,
    Sean


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