SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 88
  1. #26
    Non-Member bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    3,760
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    I'm not sure if I would call C# a "dialect of C" and there is no direct relationship between the two. If I were being pedantic I'd argue that if true then the vast majority of languages are dialects.
    Many of them are! Javascript, Java, Perl, C#... even PHP are C dialect languages... Curly brackets for blocks, if, switch, case, function... That's C. Sure they all play games with it with tiny little tunings; but they're all at their heart C dialect with chrome trim and function libraries tacked on them. You can do one of them, converting to an other usually involved learning a few minor syntax differences, some minor programmatic differences... and that nobody can agree how objects should be built/handled. That's how I picked up PHP as fast as I did -- Ooh look, $ to say var, no strict typecasting, no pointers... and a MASSIVE built in auto-included function library. OOH, that warranted calling it a new language, sure it did

    Pascal, Modula-2, Cobol, Fortran, Ruby, Python -- NOT C dialect. I've never been a fan of AT&T/C dialect languages in the first place; I can work with them, but I'd kill for a GOOD modula-2 compiler with library support and decent documentation. As it is I think that's why I do so much object pascal still. Verbose language with strict typecasting, strict structural rules, and strict memory management with automatic range checking... Count me in. Lands sake if more programming languages had those features we'd have a lot less buggy software in the wild... Or as Phillip Khan used to say "Memory leak, what's that? Oh, we don't have those, sorry."

    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    Give Mono a try. I was sceptical about it at first, but Microsoft has helped out tremendously and a few weeks ago I managed to get an internal C# application working on an old Fedora box with next to no changes needed at all.
    Mono is pretty impressive -- it's not perfect 1:1 and lags behind, but it is surprising how much does work.

    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    and it's the route that many modern languages like Java and Python have taken in regards to desktop development.
    Which is why most such "desktop" apps are total garbage... well, unless you're stuck on a system where there is no native equivalent.

    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    In regards to the topic at hand (Web Development) I don't think there's a single instance of drag and drop coding anywhere in the language.
    You wouldn't know if from the output I'm used to seeing from ASP.NET based programs. I've rarely seen ANYTHING involving the three letters "ASP" online that was worth confederate half-penny... but then I say the EXACT same thing about Dreamweaver so...

    Quote Originally Posted by ULTiMATE View Post
    The reason I like C# so much is because of the clean code you can produce with it. Here's a small example of what I mean.

    Code:
    protected bool AllEmpty(params string[] values) {
        return values.All(value => value.Equals(""));
    }
    There's very little fluff in this code and even a non-technical manager can look in at this code, think for a few seconds and know exactly what it does.
    Weird, I know enough C and C# I should understand that, but to me it looks like an unnecessary far call, a self reference... and a wee bit of gibberish.

    Though that could just be a bad example -- it reeks of "function for nothing other than flushing performance"... In other words a job for a compiler macro, NOT a function.

    But that's the machine language in me talking. Problem is I'm seeing people deploying code like that all the blasted time now... nothing like TRIPLING your execution times.

    But of course, if you've never dealt with the under the hood machine level language operations, concepts like far calls, stack passing and state preservation are likely... well...

    Probably a lot of my disconnect with such code -- I'm thinking about the penalty such things add under the hood; For example last week I helped a guy NOT have to move off shared hosting (or should I say prevented him from getting kicked off...) by breaking up a multi-table query into separate ones; his result set was so large on an operation called by EVERY visit for logged in users he was choking out the system RAM... My "optimization" of breaking a single query into many smaller ones running full force pimp-slap in the face of what ANY SQL "expert" will tell you. They're usually so obsessed with the handshaking to mySQL they forget to think about the penalty of shoving around 256k ROWS in the data processing and returns... Say hello to 64 megabyte total data sets for something that as separate queries doesn't even break 64k. JOIN is NOT always the answer if you understand all the other bits of what's going on.

    I guess I just have a wee bit different perspective on this stuff.

  2. #27
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    34
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What do you mean move on ? Dreamweaver is top level as far as webdesign goes . You just need to learn how to use it . I've been using it since version 6 and never stopped loving it . With all the ultra powerful capabilities it has I would never quit it . The only reason why not to code in DW are RIAs . Then you might want to get into more tools . But for a website i'd never leave it . Once you mastered it it's addictive .

    BTW I also used hand coding since day 1 . WYSIWYG is just a major bonus and a massive visual aid .

  3. #28
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy Stormrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    3,133
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you just use CodeView in DW, there are far better development environments out there with more features.

  4. #29
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Got turned on to Komodo edit by a web dev friend and really liked its code hinting that shows what is inside each div.

    however stuck with DW as i'd gotten used to it and it's loverly colour picker

  5. #30
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    63
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it is cool to use Dreamweaver. I have attended a short course briefing and the speaker describes some of the feature those are really seams good to me. However; I haven't used it yet.

  6. #31
    SitePoint Wizard mcsolas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Hermosa Costa Rica
    Posts
    1,710
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The coda app looks really interesting, I took a closer look at some features. Considering getting a mac soon, so I was wondering what type of options were out there.

  7. #32
    Non-Member bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    3,760
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stormrider View Post
    whitespace stripping (only from the end of a line)
    Only from end of line? What does that even mean... wait, are you referring to the removal of trailing spaces? That's NOT what I mean. Sorry, what I meant is what call "minification" today, back in the day it was called white-space stripping. Removing ALL non-essential white-space, not just a few characters here and there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stormrider View Post
    code folding (brilliant when debugging problems by hiding bits temporarily that are irrelevant to code, or in an OOP setting so you can just expand the function you are working on and see clearly without extra stuff surrounding it).
    Which doesn't make ANY sense to me as if you're debugging problems you don't know what to fold and what not to... as to "extra stuff around it" if it's before the function or after it, it's off-screen or out of the way. If it's inside it, how do you know that's not where the problem is?!? Makes no sense whatsoever.

    Or maybe I'm just spoiled by 1200px tall displays where I kill all the toolbars so I have as much vertical height as possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stormrider View Post
    Your own website looks like it has used some sort of whitespace stripping incidentally in that you open one HTML tag on the same line as you closed the previous one. Very odd, never seen such strange formatting!
    That's not white-space stripping, notice all the tabs? Like, EVERYWHERE. (admittedly a few of the indentations got messed up when the original template was sliced into the php back-end)

    THIS:
    Code:
    	<ol class="jumpto">
    		<li>
    			<a href="#pageWrapper"
    				accesskey="1"
    				rel="nofollow"
    				title="Top of Page"
    			>Top of Page</a>
    		</li><li>
    			<a href="#mainMenu"
    				accesskey="2"
    				rel="nofollow"
    				title="Main Menu"
    			>Main Menu</a>
    		</li><li>
    			<a href="#content"
    				accesskey="3"
    				rel="nofollow"
    				title="Page Content"
    			>Page Content</a>
    		</li><li>
    			<a href="#sideBar"
    				accesskey="4"
    				rel="nofollow"
    				title="Page Extras"
    			>Page Extras</a>
    		</li><li>
    			<a href="#footer"
    				accesskey="9"
    				rel="nofollow"
    				title="Bottom of Page"
    			>Bottom of Page</a>
    		</li>
    	</ol>
    Is NOT whitespace stripped. Whitespace stripped would be this:

    Code:
    <ol class="jumpto"><li><a href="#pageWrapper" accesskey="1" rel="nofollow" title="Top of Page">Top of Page</a></li><li><a href="#mainMenu" accesskey="2" rel="nofollow" title="Main Menu">Main Menu</a></li><li><a href="#content" accesskey="3" rel="nofollow" title="Page Content">Page Content</a></li><li><a href="#sideBar" accesskey="4" rel="nofollow" title="Page Extras">Page Extras</a></li><li><a href="#footer" accesskey="9" rel="nofollow" title="Bottom of Page">Bottom of Page</a></li></ol>
    That's what I mean when I say whitespace stripping. Usually practiced by people who have something fundamentally wrong with their HTML, CSS, javascript or whatever else they are applying it to in the first place! By the time gzip and/or a decent php bytecode cache is done with it, those shouldn't have more than a 1-2% impact on page speed and most always it ends up biting you in the ass in the long run... EVERY time I see that type of nonsense practiced it's by people blowing tens (if not hundreds) of k of markup on 1k of content.

    See that fly infested maggot ridden piece of corpulent filth known as jquery. Minification/white space stripping is usually just a way to sweep problems under the rug instead of actually fixing them. Do a view source over on a recent Google page for proof enough of that in action.

    As to the </li><li> on the same line, that's pretty common practice especially if you follow the 76 rule -- if you mean the </hr> and or </ol><hr /></ul> -- that's a side effect of putting it into the CMS I didn't bother cleaning up as the output is clean enough to decipher, and it looks cleaner PHP-side. (since they're in entirely different functions/methods)

  8. #33
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    27
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can code in Notepad. It's not a huge deal the same concepts apply. However, Dreamweaver does some things for you that are nice. The tabbing out is great. Auto-closing tags is very cool. I also like the color coding making it easier to read.

    Using dreamweaver doesn't mean you're a beginner. You're just using the tools that you have available to you to make it faster for you.

  9. #34
    SitePoint Enthusiast 3dy.ro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm working on a Mac too, and I've done a lot of research before choosing my text editor - which is currently Coda by Panic.

    Well, the best choices are:
    • Coda by Panic, for lazy people.
    • Espresso by MacRabbit (the makers of CSSEdit), for lazy people too, I guess. It's shiny.
    • BBEdit, a powerhorse. Or TextWrangler, it's great too, and free.
    • Smultron or Fraise, depending by your system's version. It's an excellent one, really, and free. In fact, if someone would be willing to buy my Coda license, I'd ask the guys at Panic transfer it and go for Smultron.
    • A cross-platform IDE such as Aptana Studio or Komodo Edit. I found them very, very good and they run so great that you barely notice that they are based on Java.

    I'd suggest you to go for whatever works. And if it's free, it's even better. Although it's great to work on a very polished and eye-candy app such as Coda or Espresso, the truth is that Smultron or TextWrangler, combined with CyberDuck, are wonderful and will fit most of your programming needs.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy Stormrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    3,133
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Which doesn't make ANY sense to me as if you're debugging problems you don't know what to fold and what not to... as to "extra stuff around it" if it's before the function or after it, it's off-screen or out of the way. If it's inside it, how do you know that's not where the problem is?!? Makes no sense whatsoever.
    Makes no sense to you perhaps, but then I've seen enough of your strange 'methods' to not be at all surprised by that!

    It's quite easy when debugging to know what does or doesn't constitute part of the problem. Hiding the parts that don't makes it easier to visualise what is going on with the relevant code. In fact I used this only today when debugging and guess what? The problem stood out straight away when you collapse irrelevant parts of the code and just have the problem parts close to each other. Guess that proves your theory about it not working wrong then!

    Collapsing methods also allows you to scroll quickly through a class to get to the method you need, very useful.

    That's what I mean when I say whitespace stripping. Usually practiced by people who have something fundamentally wrong with their HTML, CSS, javascript or whatever else they are applying it to in the first place! By the time gzip and/or a decent php bytecode cache is done with it, those shouldn't have more than a 1-2% impact on page speed and most always it ends up biting you in the ass in the long run... EVERY time I see that type of nonsense practiced it's by people blowing tens (if not hundreds) of k of markup on 1k of content.

    See that fly infested maggot ridden piece of corpulent filth known as jquery. Minification/white space stripping is usually just a way to sweep problems under the rug instead of actually fixing them. Do a view source over on a recent Google page for proof enough of that in action.
    ...You do realise that only the production code is minified right? And you can download the full, unminified version of jQuery if you like? Not everyone has the option to turn on gzipping for their server.

    As to the </li><li> on the same line, that's pretty common practice especially if you follow the 76 rule -- if you mean the </hr> and or </ol><hr /></ul> -- that's a side effect of putting it into the CMS I didn't bother cleaning up as the output is clean enough to decipher, and it looks cleaner PHP-side. (since they're in entirely different functions/methods)
    Common practice in DSland maybe :P I've never seen it on a single site before, or ever heard of the 76 rule.

  11. #36
    SitePoint Evangelist artcoder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    598
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dreamweaver is the best. It is the primary editor I use. Don't move away from it. The built-in FTP is big plus. Yes, Firebug is good. But you use Firebug in conjunction with Dreamweaver. Use Dreamweaver to write code and Firebug to debug.

  12. #37
    padawan silver trophybronze trophy markbrown4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    4,095
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    You wouldn't know if from the output I'm used to seeing from ASP.NET based programs. I've rarely seen ANYTHING involving the three letters "ASP" online that was worth confederate half-penny... but then I say the EXACT same thing about Dreamweaver so...
    You're not listening, You're talking about ASP.NET's webforms which have been replaced by MVC.
    Visual Studio is the only option for writing .NET apps.

    As for me, I use TextMate exclusively on mac and Visual Studio on the pc.

  13. #38
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Am also a newbie in using the dream viewer and i hope i too will get lot of suggestions and tips on using it trough this thread

  14. #39
    SitePoint Zealot Bannaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm still a huge fan of DW - still havn't used anything that compares to both the design and codeview panels.
    Bannaz - Flash Banner Design
    █ Leading designers in online advertising.
    www.bannaz.com

  15. #40
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,233
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    but as a multiple display user when it comes to code editors, tabs are a step BACKWARDS in functionality since they prevent me from seeing three or four windows of code side-by-side;
    In vim those are called "windows", which are different from tabs. You can even have tabs in windows and windows in tabs if you want (dunno why one would).

    Ran across a program called "Terminator" which splits your terminal into multiple windows. Though when I looked at the about page it was like all written in Java or something so I passed.
    (note: this isn't a text editor, just a program for displaying terminals differently)

    Guess I'll still suggest the OP try out vim. The worst that could happen is they run screaming from the computer and huddle in a corner for a few hours, sobbing. But after proper initiation to the cult, you can become a superhero.

  16. #41
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    34
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stormrider View Post
    If you just use CodeView in DW, there are far better development environments out there with more features.
    If they have code hinting for all the languages DW has . The ability to preview at different resolutions and the integration DW has then i'll quit in the blink of an eye . So far i've yet to see a superior product .

  17. #42
    SitePoint Enthusiast 3dy.ro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    Honestly if you're on a Mac and looking for anything MORE that Text Wrangler, you're probably over-reliant on "tools" and looking to take shortcuts that will bite you in the backside in the long term.
    To late to agree but... yeah.

    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    It's like all this other pointless crap -- code folding, whitespace stripping -- it's all a bunch of nonsense that if you need, there's probably something fundamentally flawed with your code.
    What don't you like at code folding? I find it excellent... too bad very few editors have it. TextWrangler does though (while Coda doesn't... yet).

  18. #43
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, United States
    Posts
    4,052
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    i can't stand code folding… I always think I'm going to lose some part of it or something.
    The only code I hate more than my own is everyone else's.

  19. #44
    SitePoint Enthusiast 3dy.ro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by oddz View Post
    i can't stand code folding… I always think I'm going to lose some part of it or something.
    Haha... I consider it a gift from the Skies... I finish a part of the document and I never have to see it again.

  20. #45
    SitePoint Evangelist
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    542
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just quickly switched to Notepad2 after using Notepad for some time (in the first of two web design classes I took, we coded exclusively with Notepad). That's pretty much it for Windows web dev. There's nothing I need now from DW or Notepad++ that's already there with Notepad2.

    As a mostly PHP coder, I'm not sure how should I approach learning with .NET. What would be a good "my first asp.NET site"? The abstraction layers feel overkill for a website that just requires a contact form. And I've done a few with an MVC framework before.

  21. #46
    Non-Member bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    3,760
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ccRicers View Post
    I just quickly switched to Notepad2
    Notepad 2 you say? Havenae heard of that one... Investigating... Let's go down the list of stuff I want that have been deal breakers on other editors.

    Turn off stupid toolbars? Check!

    Block level tab control? Check!

    Not tabbed? Check!

    Handles common character encodings? Check!

    Can change default font? Check!

    Strip trailing spaces? Check!

    Turn off acid trip syntax highlighting? Check!

    Single File instance? Check!

    Indentation guides? Check!

    Tab width settings? Check! (defaults to 2, what I use anyways!)

    Word-wrap to first line indentation? Check! (called "first subline")

    Visual indicators to show wrapping? Check! (one of the few things Crimson lacks!)

    Longest line marker for 76 rule? Yup... (seems to default to 72 instead of 76? Eh, good enough... and not like it can't be changed)
    Convert leading spaces to tabs... Nope. WAIT, they call it "tabify" and "untabify" -- so... Yup...

    No deal breakers -- WOW. You know, I may have a new favorite editor. Which it had right-click integration, but that's easy enough to add in the registry. Though... I'm not seeing it, is there any way to make the line numbers not be red? That's illegible and a eyesore... -- edit -- nm, found it.

    In any case thanks, was unaware of this one, it's fast, it's small, and it does everything I need. Bye-bye Crimson Editor, was nice knowing you. Funny this is based on scintilla, given what a piece of Scite that one is... But you strip away all the crap we don't want and hey, it's pretty good.

  22. #47
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,233
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    i can't stand code folding… I always think I'm going to lose some part of it or something.
    ditto

    Congrats crusty on finding a new love :)

  23. #48
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bristol, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,158
    Mentioned
    46 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    Which is why most such "desktop" apps are total garbage... well, unless you're stuck on a system where there is no native equivalent.
    I'm still trying to decide if you're trolling me or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    You wouldn't know if from the output I'm used to seeing from ASP.NET based programs. I've rarely seen ANYTHING involving the three letters "ASP" online that was worth confederate half-penny... but then I say the EXACT same thing about Dreamweaver so...
    Well, seeing as many of the worlds largest websites run ASP.NET that point is as good as dead. If anything, given the barrier to entry of languages you're far more likely to see terrible PHP sites than ASP.NET sites.

    Stack Overflow, PlentyOfFish, MySpace (recently), parts of eBay, Dell, most airport sites, the list goes on.

    We're quite lucky to be at a point in time where most frameworks and languages are so refined that it really doesn't matter what you use to build a website.

    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    Weird, I know enough C and C# I should understand that, but to me it looks like an unnecessary far call, a self reference... and a wee bit of gibberish.

    Though that could just be a bad example -- it reeks of "function for nothing other than flushing performance"... In other words a job for a compiler macro, NOT a function.
    A couple of red herrings there.

    First, you say you know "enough" C and C# that you should know what that code represents, yet you couldn't identify one of the simplest tools from .NET 3.0, the Lambda expression. For those who won't know what this does, it takes in a set of parameters and checks to see if they're all empty.

    Secondly, you again mention C, which has little to nothing to do with C#.

    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    But that's the machine language in me talking. Problem is I'm seeing people deploying code like that all the blasted time now... nothing like TRIPLING your execution times.
    I'm glad you brought this up, because it's more often than not flat out wrong when compared to the likes of C++.

    Theoretically, there is no reason why C# code should be slower than C++ code, yet for practical reasons code can be slower in certain situations. The reason why the likes of Java and C# are often as fast as C++ when doing typical tasks is because the JVM and the .NET framework are two of the most optimised and efficient bits of software in the world, and are the result of thousands of man years. Additionally, the JIT complication of IL is optimised for the system the runtime is on, whereas for C++ it is optimised for minimum requirements.

    There are benchmarks out there that state that C# can outperform C++ on certain tasks like working with string collections, but I've never been a fan of any benchmarks as there are so many relevant factors not tested. I'd sooner listen to a SEO analyst talk about getting to the top of Google than listen to someone talk about benchmarks relating to their favourite tools.

    Sure, C++ is better if you're looking for strict control over your memory handling, but the crux of the matter is that for most obvious code (which 99.999% of development often is) will not receive any increase in speed or execution if swapped with C++. This SO question tells it far better than I possibly could, but I'll leave this with one point; bytecode managed languages make programmers faster, and programmer time is worth far more than program time.

  24. #49
    SitePoint Enthusiast NicoJulius's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    46
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi, I think Dreamweaver is perfect for your needs. Yes, there is a lot of other software out there, but don't expect magic. You're the programmer, not the software. If you feel fine using Dreamweaver, just continue using it.

  25. #50
    SitePoint Evangelist
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    542
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, nice to know I helped give DS60 a new tool to work with. It is pretty lean and non-intrusive. Can't see why I can't just have anything other than that to work with.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •