SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 34 of 34
  1. #26
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    226
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You've got some great skills, superbrava. Don't compare to yourself to anybody else, because you'll never measure up. It goes both ways; they'll never fill your shoes either. Comes with the territory, I'd say.

    Instead of trying to go after a certain style or look (aka presstube, surfstation, 2advanced, etc. that while are incredibly cool) focus on your own inspirations, and your own views of the everyday world around you. This is where the very best in design comes from. Just doing your own thing and interpreting the world completely through your own eyes...if you spend time hanging around coolhomepages.com, designiskinky.com or k10k.com, you'll never take the chance to look deep down inside and design for the pure pleasure of design.

    We all have creative block, and we all have days (and weeks, and months) when nothing inspires us. I dread those days as much as the next artist but the reality is, those moments do come and we have to deal with them the best we can. Remember when you're feeling crappy about your skills, all those times when you were able to sit down with a pad of a paper or an empty Photoshop document and just threw down a mad piece of art. Something that absorbed you, and sucked you in for hours and hours, while you wittled away at the design, pixel by pixel and line by line. Those are the good times you have to pick yourself up with.

    And for learning server-side scripting, good on 'ya for picking up PHP and MySQL. Don't get discouraged about not being the best at anything, because here's a reality check, there will always be so many people "better" than you. Stick to your guns, build on your current skills and develop a niche for yourself.

    And something else? Have some fun. Web design/development is a dreamjob compared to slugging cement or loading a garbage truck.

    geof

  2. #27
    ********* Genius Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    5,458
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll have to join the crowd on this one aswell You have good skills. Those were pretty sweet. I wish I could do graphics that good!
    Last edited by naramation; Sep 18, 2002 at 23:27.
    Mike
    It's not who I am underneath, but what I do that defines me.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Guru moonman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    The Sea of Tranquility
    Posts
    696
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm with everyone else, I loved your designs. I know how you feel though, I've been building basic websites for over 2 years now, and I can't get near another job, because I don't know ASP or Java or C++.

  4. #29
    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    in transition
    Posts
    21,236
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Re: Why I need to know everything

    Originally posted by superbrava
    [B]I've been checking out web design companies websites, and I've also figured out that most companies are pretty small-scale, meaning they have less than 5 people, that's the majority of what I've seen.

    I hate the fact that they can offer PHP, Perl, Database Design (Access, MySQL, MSQL, Oracle), JSP, ASP, ASP.NET, VB, Java, JavaScript, DHTML, XML, Python, C/C++/C#, etc...

    Who in the hell is able to learn all of that????!?!?!?!
    Actually, if you're in the game long enough you will play around with most of those goodies eventually. So far the only ones I haven't played with from your list are Python and C++. But then again, I came to the web from a programming background so I have to know as much of this stuff as I can (or at least I think I do!).

    It would take me a lifetime, and I don't have that long. So I figure if I got a GOOD server-side language under my belt, and can learn Databases, that i could create the entire solution myself.
    Your logic is fine for the short term but flawed in the long term. If you learn one server side language you can probably get the job, but what happens when that language is obsolete in 2-5 years? For example, there seems to be a much bigger market for JSP developers nowadays than Perl.

    Also, your decision to create an "entire solution" by yourself is suspect. If you ever have to do more than a basic small online store or advertising site, I hope you have more than yourself working on it, or your client can wait a long time. It is best to do those pieces which you are better at by yourself, and get help from others more versed in your weaker areas. For example, you lay out the site from a logical perspective, design it, code the HTML, and have a programmer-type code logic and functionality in for you.

  5. #30
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    113
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Why I need to know everything

    Superbrava –

    You need to figure out if want to be a developer or a web designer. I think it is frankly hard to be good at both. Whichever side you pick, you should also know something about the other but focus on one. Eventually you will have to choose.

    I am a developer and have been one for about 4 years for a financial company. I do both internal development and web stuff. I don't know how to get your foot in the door as a designer but I can give some advice from a developer's point of view.

    First, believe in yourself and educate yourself. If you are doing PHP, MySQL, and HTML then I think you have what it takes to be a developer. If you want to be a developer, get a job with a big company. Big companies tend to have more resources and will expose you to more as well. You might have a better chance getting a job at a bigger place because they could afford to let you grow. A small place probably really needs someone good and experienced right away.

    You are actually doing the right thing right now. You should seriously look into getting into a company as a helpdesk support person like what you are doing now. These departments are almost always in a larger Information Systems department, which will also house the developers. Prove yourself as the helpdesk guy and you could then move up to a developer position later on.

    This is exactly what I did. 4 years ago I was answering support calls on our website. Within a year I was doing MS Access development and HTML/javascript. Then I moved on to Lotus Notes/Domino and Java. I now run the entire site. I got lucky in some aspects but my point is that it can be done. You just need to get your foot in the door and prove yourself, which is the hard part. If it's dealing with MS Word questions for another year to get where you want to go, then so what! Just think where you will be in a year if you don’t?

    Also get a headhunter. They will work with new people. You might as well have someone else looking with you right. What can it hurt? Also, some companies never even advertise their job openings. In fact, we don’t. We have a working relationship with a headhunter and we hire 90% of our people through her at all levels. There are jobs out there, you just may not know about them. You must understand that a good headhunter for an IS department can be a really good thing. They weed out all the jokers.

    You said . . .
    Originally posted by superbrava
    I hate the fact that they can offer PHP, Perl, Database Design (Access, MySQL, MSQL, Oracle), JSP, ASP, ASP.NET, VB, Java, JavaScript, DHTML, XML, Python, C/C++/C#, etc...

    Who in the hell is able to learn all of that????!?!?!?!
    Remember, that most job ads are listing their “dream candidate.” They usually hire someone without all those skills. Honestly, there really are not a lot of people out there that can do all this well. In fact, I think you would be hard pressed to find a really good Java (JSP) and ASP guy. Usually a person has an area of expertise. It is good to learn the other stuff so you are not pigeoned holed but I would focus on something.

    If you want a Java guy, then by God you want a Java guy. An ASP person that thinks they know Java (or vice versa) because they built a program once is just a disaster waiting to happen. It takes awhile to be good at anything. It is like the guy that thinks he knows how Computers work so he goes in and messes with his settings. Eventually, he crashes his computer and the people that do know what they are doing then have to fix it. Ignorance is bliss! Take HTML for example. A lot of people know HTML, javascript, css, etc. but not that many people are really good at it and know the ins and outs. It takes experience to know that. Anyone can use a WYSIWYG editor!

    By the way, the same goes for design. A good designer is really good and it takes experience and talent.

    My experience with website construction at larger companies is the developer does the coding (JSP, ASP, HTML, etc.) and a designer designs the site (colors, look and feel, etc.). These two jobs work together. You sometimes even have another guy that handles the administration of the web and application servers. The designer may also do the HTML as well. My point is that design and developer parts are separate except in maybe smaller places. The guys that know everything are very experienced and have a several years of work under their belt. However, I hope the guys that think they know it all really know their sh*t because otherwise they are doing a real disservice to their customers.

    Look, believe in yourself and educate yourself. Nobody learns everything at once. Pick a subject and make a goal. Once you reach that goal, then pick another subject and another goal. A year later and you will know a lot of stuff! If you don't, then it will be a year later and you will be in the same boat as you are now. Take some classes. They will help especially for something like Java or VisualBasic.

    Don't try going out starting your own business. Go work for a company and a big one if you can. That way you can see how things are done. Then if you want to start your own business, then great. At least you know what you are getting into at that point.

    I hope this helps, but then again, what the h*ll do I know
    signature

  6. #31
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Superbrava

    Keep in mind that site like bn.com were created by a team of people... so it is unrealistic to think you can acheive something of that scale on your own without putting lots of time into it, and maybe even burning yourself out in doing so... When you get designers block.. turn off your computer.. leave your home or office and go somewhere... go for a walk... and brainstorm... then put pen to paper instead right there on the spot. I've come to many answers this way... so maybe it can help you also..

  7. #32
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    empathy

    I feel your pain man. I just got a job as a web designer but I have to do all the developing myself. Which is cool cause I get to learn to all for free. I come from a graphic design background mainly doing print. I'm totally lost in the forest of developing...but you always have to forsee a way out. This is all I have to offer so far.
    http://www.analyticalandmaterials.com www.fiberhaus.com

    -peace

  8. #33
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is a great thread. I and I'm sure lots of others have had the same thoughts starting out. I've even seen a few giving up.

    I appreciate a lot of the comments that have been made to you, especially the ones hinting at the teamwork elements. Find or put together a team of mixed talents and then open up shop, canvas, knock on doors, let your fingers do the walking, etc. But don't quit.

    I play with designing, myself. It's an artistic expression for me, and for that reason, I'll never give up playing with it. I like to sometimes remind myself of all those artists of the past that we don't even learn about until they've turned to ash and some canvas mysterious appears after a war. Although getting a paycheck for our talents is great, artists can't let the $$$ factor in to their creative work. They have to let their raison d'etre just be!

    I also liked the suggestion about entering in contests, and think that a wise way of getting your name out there. just keep stroking that keyboard, and take enjoyment in your creations for the time being. You'll figure a way to make things happen eventually, and they will!

  9. #34
    SitePoint Enthusiast hcaz32000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI USA
    Posts
    63
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I loved your sites. I've been designing for three years. I haven't got any jobs. I do it because I like to design. I think if you tried to not make yourself design you would be more successful. Just go for what your feeling. Go for what you like. One of the hardest things for me is when I design a Website I get caught up into making it so perfect and so it works for everyone. If you make a site and you like it then it's the best you can do. If a web design don't like your design and guess that's your loss. You don't have to know the programming really. I do agree that you have to have a full Website instead of partials. Just design what you want for right now to build your portfolio.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •