SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    SitePoint Addict bimalpoudel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Kathmandu, Nepal
    Posts
    279
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Why do projects deliver delayed?

    A lot of projects end, consuming more than the expected delivery dates. Let us try to find out a lot reasons for this, and tips to reduce this time factor, without compromising the quality of work.

    For example, right from the beginning, if the estimation itself was wrong or ambitious; it may explain short time of completion. The real time taken cannot be minimized, but we can estimate the time naturally.

    Trying to satisfy the customer by promising a too quick job could be one reason, here.

    What more reasons?
    How to solve them?
    Bimal Poudel @ Sanjaal Framework over Smarty Template Engine
    ASKING INTERESTING QUESTIONS ON SITEPOINT FOURM

    Hire for coding support - PHP/MySQL

  2. #2
    Life is short. Be happy today! silver trophybronze trophy Sagewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Denver, Phang-Nga, Thailand
    Posts
    4,379
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, it's going to be hard to cover that whole topic in the scope of a single thread on an email. There are so many reasons why projects go over budget and miss schedules.

    The main reason is that even a small website or application is much more complex and difficult to build than many people realize, and when combined with the fact that IT resources are diverse and inconsistent with regards to skills and experience, it's not that surprising that so many efforts fail.

    There is the business aspect, where projects are frequently mismanaged, poorly planned, and unrealistically scheduled.

    There is the technical aspect, where best practices in process and project management are unknown or ignored.

    There is the social/cultural aspect, where the lack of strong standards, certifications, qualifications, and credentials combines with the zero barrier to entry in the industry and it's simply hard to establish solid workflow and collaboration.

    And lots more. There are great books available about this topic, which has been discussed intensely in the software industry for 40 years.
    The fewer our wants, the nearer we resemble the gods. Socrates

    SAGEWING LLC - QUALITY WEB AND MOBILE APPS. PREMIUM OUTSOURCING SERVICES.
    Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook | Google+

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard webcosmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,480
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    this could be for many reasons:
    unrealistic timeline
    judgement error
    client response time
    work load on other projects
    complexity of the project
    loss of employees
    etc etc

  4. #4
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    358
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe it's just the 80/80 rule: The first 80% of a project takes the first 80% of the time, the remaining 20% of the project takes the other 80% of the time. <g>
    Doug G
    =====
    "If you ain't the lead dog, the view is always the same - Anon

  5. #5
    SitePoint Enthusiast thex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Projects delay as they involve humans

    -----
    Timelines has to be created separately for planning & freezing the features and then for the execution work (design & programming). If Phase 1 delays, it will push Phase 2 and 3.
    -----
    Timelines should not include the amendments to the frozen features. Additions and amendments has to be tracked separately with their own timeline, probably in next phase.
    -----
    In our experience, delays happen from client end when they need to give feedback or any inputs on the way. It may not be their intention to delay but they might need some time to check on the things. It is always best to get all required inputs during the planning itself.
    -----
    Make more buffer time, 20% to 40% depending on the project type (and client response in the initial days).
    -----
    If we involve more third party co-development, expect the project will take at least 50% more of the estimated time to complete.
    ALL IS IN THE DETAILS!
    Bizsite: www.probeseven.com

  6. #6
    SitePoint Member element01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug G View Post
    I believe it's just the 80/80 rule: The first 80% of a project takes the first 80% of the time, the remaining 20% of the project takes the other 80% of the time. <g>
    So true!

    I had never heard of this '80/80 rule' before, but I can relate. I recently hired a team of freelancers, the work was delivered on time as promised.

    However, the bugs I have found after delivery mean that development has continued weeks after the deadline.

    I personally believe that some 'less honest' freelancers will propose an unrealistic time frame for completion, in order to win your business.

  7. #7
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,686
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by element01 View Post
    I personally believe that some 'less honest' freelancers will propose an unrealistic time frame for completion, in order to win your business.
    It's not just "less than honest ones". The bidding process naturally encourages firms to tone down their cost / timelines to win business. Then you throw in slow starts, other projects that come in delayed and it just makes the water even murkier.

    At the same time clients often don't know what they actually want and they [we, i am one more than not] don't often to stop to re-evaluate the project after a discovery or initial ID phase to insure the timelines are still right. And in the desire to speed up agencies cut our time to think... it's not all design & develop, review cycles, content creation, just opening emails takes time and usually projects stack ontop of a regular job for everyone involved [on the hiring side].

    Proper discovery and specifications are essential for any project to be estimated in the first place but what really works is having sanity checkpoints along the way to see if it's still on the same schedule. But it's all a dream to think you can nail it down perfectly. Change happens because. Talking up front and seeing are totally different and if the goal is to do it quick you end up in a bind if any one thing comes unhinged. That's why you see even small government projects with 3 year timelines... pad things enough and you'll be early even when things go wrong.

    Several years ago I learned a lesson which has held true to me from that point on: If a high[er] priced firm refuses to do a project in the timeline you've given them, change the timeline or change the project...
    - Ted S


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •