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View Poll Results: What does the word "digs" mean to you?

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  • Residence, place, crib, apartment, etc.

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  1. #1
    Barefoot on the Moon! silver trophy Force Flow's Avatar
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    Digs - do you know the word as slang for "clothes" or "residence"?

    I got into a discussion on the use of the slang word "digs". I've only heard it as another word for clothes. Someone else has only heard it as another word for residence, place, crib, etc. As such, both of us agree that it sounds like the word is misused for what the other has known it as.

    When you hear the word "digs", what do do you usually associate it with?

    Example: "Hey, check out my new digs!"
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  2. #2
    I meant that to happen silver trophybronze trophy Raffles's Avatar
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    In Britain, I've only heard it used as a place where you live. Most commonly as "student digs".

  3. #3
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    Same.

  4. #4
    Non-Member Kalon's Avatar
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    I'm not sure I've ever heard of "digs" used as slang, but maybe I've just lead a sheltered life

    I thought slang for clothes was "clobber" or "threads".

    "Hey, check out my new clobber!"

    or

    "Hey, check out my new threads!"

  5. #5
    Barefoot on the Moon! silver trophy Force Flow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalon View Post
    "Hey, check out my new clobber!"
    That's one I haven't heard.

    Does saying "I'm gunna clobber you!" then have a double meaning?
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  6. #6
    Non-Member Kalon's Avatar
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    I suppose it depends on the context it is used - noun or verb

    from http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/c.htm

    clobber Noun. Clothes and personal belongings. {Informal}
    Verb. To hit. E.g."I clobbered him over the head with a pool cue and made a break for the exit."

    it's used in aussie slang.

  7. #7
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    "Student Digs" this word i have heard before. Let me think when....where.....

  8. #8
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    I've never heard it used as a slang for clothes. But I have heard it used as slang for "residence".

    Other than the appropriate use for "archaeological sites" I've most commonly heard it used for "likes" as in "She digs Rock and Roll music".

  9. #9
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    it also means "to poke fun at"

    noun example: "NotSoRandomMember reacts aggressively to harmless digs"
    Last edited by Mittineague; Dec 10, 2010 at 12:45.
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  10. #10
    Barefoot on the Moon! silver trophy Force Flow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mittineague View Post
    Other than the appropriate use for "archaeological sites" I've most commonly heard it used for "likes" as in "She digs Rock and Roll music".
    Yep, forgot about that one
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  11. #11
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Mostly heard it as a slang synonym for likes but have heard it used on tv as a slang term for residence. Have never come across it as a slang term for clothes as that would be confusing - "do you like this house I am wearing?", "yes those are nice digs".
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  12. #12
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    Never heard of it... not even when I was living in UK... but then, I was not a student so maybe... the truth is that I don't know

  13. #13
    Non-Member Kalon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalon View Post
    I'm not sure I've ever heard of "digs" used as slang, but maybe I've just lead a sheltered life

    I thought slang for clothes was "clobber" or "threads".

    "Hey, check out my new clobber!"

    or

    "Hey, check out my new threads!"
    it's mainly used (and I only hear and use it very occassionally) in an informal context.

    a better example would be:

    you could be arriving home wearing your bag of fruit when your neighbour approaches to ask you to help him load some bulky tree clippings into a trailer.

    you could reply

    I'll just go and change into some old clobber and be round in a few minutes


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