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  1. #1
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    Bachelor's degree in applied science vs BS in computer science

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm a sophomore in a community college and I would like advice regarding which career path/college degree is the best.

    My original major was accounting, but after taking an introductory course in Java, I came to like programming. So I decided to switch my major to something that's related to computer. The computer program that my school offer is Computing, Electronics, and Networking Technology (CENT). The highest degree I can get if I choose to stay in the CENT program is a Bachelor's degree in Applied Science (BAS). I unfamiliar with the BAS degree, so I don't know if this degree will get me job interviews in the future.

    While I like programming, I also like the computing and networking courses that I'm taking; I like these courses because they are hand-on work.

    Since I like programming, my friend advised me to pursue a BS degree in Computer Science because I can do a lot more with a BS degree in computer science than a Bachelor's degree in Applied Science. Now, I'm conflicted between the two degree options.

    If I go with computer science, where do I start? I have little experience with computer and programming. The only programming courses that I have taken are introductory courses in Java, Python, and HTML.

    I truly appreciate any advice you can give me to help me choose the best college degree for myself. Thank you!
    Last edited by tweetie546; Oct 26, 2010 at 14:50. Reason: typo

  2. #2
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    I would like to suggest you to go for BS in computer science. Because earning an online computer science degree has never been easier thanks in part to there availability of online technology degree programs. Online programs are convenient, flexible and allow students to pursue a degree while working. An added benefit of taking an online computer science degree program is that you gain valuable practice while taking your courses. In Applied Science, before attaining an accredited Bachelor of Applied Science degree it's important to have a specialization or concentration in mind. Applied science is a versatile program that encompasses a variety of diverse programs.

  3. #3
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    I also highly recommend going down the computer science route. Traditionally it's been the well trodden path for programmers and computer engineers so employers will certainly notice and recognise your qualification. The problem as you've stated with lesser recognised courses are that you run the risk of individuals not being able to determine how skilled you are (and you may be assumed not suitable for the role). My only advice beyond taking that course would be to continue your learning online and keep reading. Computer science is a pretty broad subject that'll give you the right backbone in programming, but you'll want to build yourself a solid portfolio of work (coding) and continue the languages of your choice at your own pace. It'll help you on the course, and as you go into the workplace.

  4. #4
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    HI tweetie546, I am computer science student. I am completing degree of computer science in that part I never found the any problem or risk in graduating. Obviously It is a very hard but not so tough.. In CS their has many programming language which you teach. and you have interest in programming language. So this is better to you. In programming you tech many qualities, get new knowledge and so many... Their have HTML, ASP, ASP.net, VB, VB.net, Java, LINUX,etc. I advice you you select the SC.

  5. #5
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    I will also recommend you to opt for BS in Computer Science bcz the present and coming time the computer science will prevail. And you told that you have also interest in computer and progamming language so always follow your interest because that way you will progress much in your field."Make Passion your Profession" and word hard.In the IT field there is much progress and plethora of opputunities for your carrier regarding stability and high salary package which is very necessary for leading a good life. Just find a good college and start soon, don't waste your very precious time.Best of Luck.
    Last edited by DaveMaxwell; Nov 1, 2010 at 07:48. Reason: removing uneccesary links

  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard
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    Like others, you should definitely go for Computer Science. You already heard other advises so I'll give you another tip. You will not learn much from school. Yes, they teach java, and few good courses. However, you will be taking a lot of non CS related courses...and some CS courses are completely (well..almost completely) useless. So, you will feel and ask questions "Why do I need to take this course" many many times.... However, having this degree will open up doors for you to learn better things. G'luck!

  7. #7
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    Thank you all for your advices! After considering everyone advices, I've decided to go for the BS degree. I wish you and your family happy holidays!

  8. #8
    Community Advisor ULTiMATE's Avatar
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    A degree in Computer Science or a related discipline (e.g. Software Engineering) is an absolute must for most IT jobs above entry-level. You'll learn lots of stuff you'll never need to apply in the real-world, but the education you receive will be vital in shaping what kind of developer you'll be and the skills you'll learn in a degree are skills you'll never pick up in a job.

    As always, the consensus is to get a CS degree at the best university you can get into/afford.


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