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  1. #1
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    make a water effect using CSS ?

    how to use CSS to make a water effect like this logo in this website, http://countryhandyman.com/

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    billycundiff{float:left;} silver trophybronze trophy RyanReese's Avatar
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    That is an image so you will need to make an image and add that effect yourself
    Always looking for web design/development work. Willing to do it cheap to build portfolio!

  3. #3
    SitePoint Zealot eLePHANT's Avatar
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    In addition to what Ryan said, best bet is to learn how to use a graphic editor such as Fireworks, Illustrator or Photoshop. Logos are mostly done in Illustrator. YouTube has plenty of tutorials on how to use these programs.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by eLePHANT View Post
    In addition to what Ryan said, best bet is to learn how to use a graphic editor such as Fireworks, Illustrator or Photoshop. Logos are mostly done in Illustrator.
    Any free tools ?

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Zealot eLePHANT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by czy11421 View Post
    Any free tools ?

    Thanks.
    Try a trial version. Those are free. I'm not the expert in which one is best for that particular effect.

  6. #6
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    Alternatives to Photoshop:
    Pixel - http://www.kanzelsberger.com/pixel/ - free.
    Gimp - http://www.gimp.org/ - free.
    Paint Shop Pro - http://www.corel.com/servlet/Satelli.../1184951547051 -- cheap, at least compared to photoshop and IMHO is WAY more suited to web development work.

    ... and if you are looking for an illustrator alternative, there's always Inkscape

    http://inkscape.org/

    As to doing the effect in any of those, it's pretty simple. Select, Copy, paste, flip the pasted copy, select the area around the pasted copy and do a flood-fill with a fading foreground color.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    As to doing the effect in any of those, it's pretty simple. Select, Copy, paste, flip the pasted copy, select the area around the pasted copy and do a flood-fill with a fading foreground color.
    From your signature, what is free alternative tool to Dreamweaver ?

    Thanks.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by czy11421 View Post
    From your signature, what is free alternative tool to Dreamweaver ?
    Any of the billion flat text editors / notepad replacements, a copy of filezilla, and the actual browsers.

    Web development "tools" -- like Dreamweaver, Kompozer, Frontpage, etc do nothing but teach bad development habits, and if you use their WYSIWYG component or any of the included templates the resulting sites are total train wrecks of non-semantic presentational outdated markup... often using javascript to do CSS' job for no good reason.

    The mere notion of a WYSIWYG for web development is absurd since between different OS, font stacks, screen sizes, default font sizes, font renderers, etc what you see on your machine is actually unlikely to be what a visitor to your site gets.... or even wants.

    Sure you can use DW just in editor mode, but then all you've done is blow several hundred dollars on an overglorified copy of notepad, a webkit (formerly Opera) based browser window that doesn't actually render like any existing browser, a mediocre/stripped down FTP client, and a 'project management' tool that usually either abused to do php's job, or just makes an even bigger mess of the markup shoving comments into your code that are mostly just likely to break your layout in legacy IE.

    As Dan used to say, "The only thing about Dreamweaver than can be considered professional grade tools are the people who promote it's use."

    I extend this to anything that has a WYSIWYG editor in it. Do not waste your time with any of that buggy, broken, bloated, overpriced (even when free) nonsense.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Zealot eLePHANT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow60 View Post
    Web development "tools" -- like Dreamweaver, Kompozer, Frontpage, etc do nothing but teach bad development habits, and if you use their WYSIWYG component or any of the included templates the resulting sites are total train wrecks of non-semantic presentational outdated markup... often using javascript to do CSS' job for no good reason.

    As Dan used to say, "The only thing about Dreamweaver than can be considered professional grade tools are the people who promote it's use."
    But what about jobs that require you to know how to use Dreamweaver? Here, I'll copy a recent job ad I saw for a Web Designer/Developer:

    Job Description

    Our web development team has an opening for a web designer with coding skills.

    This is an entry level position with room for growth.
    Applicants should have working knowledge in web development standards, including but not limited to: HTML, JAVA, AJAX, CSS,
    as well as experience in Photoshop and Dreamweaver.

    This position is DESIGN oriented, you must have a strong understanding of color, layout, design, branding, etc..,you will work hand in hand with our marketing dept.
    The above is very typical for a job posted for web developer/web design position. So in that case, don't you think Dreamweaver is essential to learn?

    BTW, I used to use Dreamweaver years ago when I first created a website. I did the typical WYSIWYG type of site. So I know what you're talking about. But there's got to be a good reason why these companies require Dreamweaver knowledge.

  10. #10
    Robert Wellock silver trophybronze trophy xhtmlcoder's Avatar
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    Usually it is because they either use DW templates themselves or don't know what they are talking about. Probably having heard it is the de facto commercial web development program so assume it is important to know how to use it.

    Most of the time they just add as many stupid abbreviations like HTML5 to a job advert as possible hoping it will deter most newbies - rarely do you see sensible requests like; being familiar with web accessibility as a requirement.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by eLePHANT View Post
    But what about jobs that require you to know how to use Dreamweaver?
    xhtmlcoder has it for the post part correct on it being basically a buzzword for many employers. The people who write job descriptions rarely understand the job in question -- their job is hiring not to understand what they are hiring for. Usually you can see this the moment AJAX is listed as a requirement when the company in question is producing sites where AJAX does nothing but add bloat and shtup accessibility... While JAVA is a dead giveaway since who the devil uses JAVA on websites anymore? (Did they mean Javascript?)... They might as well be saying "Web 2.0"

    If said advert is for a job with a development company then it's even worse, as then they are sleazing out decade out of date pages and methodologies. That advert you quoted in particular sends up huge warning flags as it sounds like one of the cookie cutter site whores who expect you to draw a pretty picture before you even think about content, barfing out a page where concepts like bandwidth restrictions and accessibility are virtually unknown... much less these houses of ill repute typically still deploy in transitional or even HTML 3.2 with html 4 tranny doctype slapped on it. It's a trap... and not a delicious one either...

    But you can see that the moment they DON'T list knowledge of WCAG or SEO as a requirement.

    Just because something has become common to the point of a industry standard, doesn't make it any good. (see IE) That goes for the draw the goofy pretty picture first approach, use of WYSIWYG editors and project management software, throwing jQuery or other bloated trash libraries at every stupid little problem, etc, etc... In fact all these 'tools' do little more than make the process take MORE time, prevent people from learning how to do ANYTHING properly, result in maintenance headaches, kicks cross-browser compatibility out the door, and increases the hosting costs... all in the name of "making it easier" -- doesn't SOUND easier, does it?

  12. #12
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    Agreed on all points.

    But what about jobs that require you to know how to use Dreamweaver?
    Might be a clue to know which jobs to avoid, though if I were still interested, I'd ask if it was ok to use vi. If it's not? Not a place I'd like to suffer at.

    While JAVA is a dead giveaway since who the devil uses JAVA on websites anymore? (Did they mean Javascript?)... They might as well be saying "Web 2.0"
    Dunno... Java people be rumblin'... http://carlfx.wordpress.com/2010/02/...ng-a-comeback/

    Of course the fact that Java in general is a much much higher source of break-ins and security problems than Adobe isn't great...
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/10...java_exploits/

    meh


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