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  1. #1
    SitePoint Addict skyhigh007's Avatar
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    Need help on people copying my content

    Hi

    While i was searching for drinks on google images and I saw my one whole blog post was copied. What should I do?

    my own website link: post
    copy Link: copy post

  2. #2
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    You may want to send the site a polite "cease and desist" letter/email to the effect of "I'm not sure if you know this, but your site contains material for which you do not have the copyright. I know, because I wrote it and did not authorize you to publish it. Please remove it immediately."

    If they don't, of course, then you'll need to threaten legal action...
    Questions are the path to wisdom,
    But answers are the proof of it!

  3. #3
    SitePoint Addict skyhigh007's Avatar
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    Thanks! I've to wait and see if they will remove it.

  4. #4
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    I'm actually not entirely sure why this upsets you.

    The thing is, this is sort of a paradox.
    Your content everywhere will drive down the value of it (just like the stock market).
    The thing is, if it's good content, it will get copied.

    So it's a question of do you want to turn yourself into a content cop? I think you likely have better things to do. You get the Google juice. Copies have a severely limited use anyway, they are substandard content.

    If this really, really bothers you, maybe you should look into a Copyscape acc't or something. Better than tediously checking the web for copies. Their Sentry will inform you when a copy is found, they have a scary "don't copy" banner.

    If you want, you could tell the site that copied your stuff "Link to the original or take it down", but then you need to be ready to escalate this if they refuse.

    Not to be too blunt, but look at what you could gain vs what you will lose.
    You could gain a (Pyrrhic) victory.
    You will lose more time and resources.
    Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Addict skyhigh007's Avatar
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    If i didn't know in the first place, I could careless, but since i found out then at least I've got to do something about it.

  6. #6
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    When I have found my articles copied online, I tried a few different approaches.

    Twice, I was lucky to see that the links I had on my article (going to different pages of my site) were left intact, so I didn’t do anything as I was still kind of benefiting.

    Other instance, I would send them an email or even leave a comment on the blog or site (this kind of ticks off the person running the show so it can be risky). I would usually give them one of three options.

    1 – Remove the article from their website or blog now.
    2 – Add in at the top of the page my name as the author as well as a link back to my website (main page).
    3 – I would state that I was a paid web content writer and my going rate was X amount of dollars (hahah usually a lot more than I actually charged). Since I was the legal owner of the content, they had the option to do #1 or #2 or I would bill them for usage. While a lot of people did respond, everyone either went with option #1 or #2.

  7. #7
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLZ View Post
    I'm actually not entirely sure why this upsets you.

    The thing is, this is sort of a paradox.
    Your content everywhere will drive down the value of it (just like the stock market).
    The thing is, if it's good content, it will get copied.

    So it's a question of do you want to turn yourself into a content cop? I think you likely have better things to do. You get the Google juice. Copies have a severely limited use anyway, they are substandard content.

    If this really, really bothers you, maybe you should look into a Copyscape acc't or something. Better than tediously checking the web for copies. Their Sentry will inform you when a copy is found, they have a scary "don't copy" banner.

    If you want, you could tell the site that copied your stuff "Link to the original or take it down", but then you need to be ready to escalate this if they refuse.

    Not to be too blunt, but look at what you could gain vs what you will lose.
    You could gain a (Pyrrhic) victory.
    You will lose more time and resources.
    This ^ is the most ridiculous piece of junk I've ever read.

    Copying an article without permission is plagiarism. It's illegal. Case closed. No author should put up with having their property stolen. It isn't okay because everybody does it. Truth is, honest people don't.

    To the op: NeoSocrates advice to you is correct.

    If the offender doesn't take it down within a reasonable length of time (I usually give them 72 hours), look up the domain at WhoIs and find their webhost. Check the host's procedure for sending a DMCA claim and follow it. You can also file a DMCA claim with the major search engines. This will result in their pages being un-indexed from the search engines and if the web host is reputable (most of them are) the site will be suspended until the offending party removes your work.

    Usually, when I file a DMCA I also send the hard copy (via email) to the web host to prove when the document was created. Hasn't failed me yet.

    Good luck.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  8. #8
    SitePoint Member tss123's Avatar
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    I agree with Linda and MotionTech. In general, it's not a bad thing if you can somehow benefit from it. More links to your site wouldn't be a bad idea.
    Cheap Timeshares for Sale and auction!

  9. #9
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    Hmm, odd.
    Seems shyflower is suggesting you in no way try to turn this to your advantage at all, and respond in a manner akin to the web version of the precursor to nuclear attack.

    As I thought I clearly stated, ask for a link - beyond that ask for removal - be prepared to escalate if you feel the need (and shyflower has given you excellent instruction on how to drop a bomb).

    At no point did I ever condone content theft, indeed if it really bugs you, do something, but
    • be aware of how far you're prepared to go.
    • don't make empty threats - they will make you both seem and feel weak.
    • ask yourself if you work for you or your ego at every step along the way. Simple question - just ask yourself "why"?

    My take: you needn't manufacture troubles, they will find you. We all need battles - ask yourself if it's a dragon or a windmill.
    I think it has windmillish qualities, but that's just my opinion.

    Ridiculous junk brought to you by BLZ 2010
    Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious.

  10. #10
    SitePoint Addict skyhigh007's Avatar
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    thanks for the suggestions guys, no one has replied my e-mail from them and its been couple days.

  11. #11
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    You know, this is really a difficult situation. I agree with the friendly cease and desist. Another thing you can also do is contact their hosting service. Again, there is no guarantee there. Do a search in Google, there is a protection for online content but the process is complicated.

  12. #12
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    If the stolen content is coming up in search results, I think one of the easiest things to do is use the "Give us feedback" link near the bottom of the results page to let Google know the results are polluted.

  13. #13
    SitePoint Enthusiast sparkie2260's Avatar
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    I've been following this thread since it started in August, and (contrary to my usual urge to comment on everything I read) :-) I withheld my opinion. Fact is, I have been sitting here trying to think of an example in history or commerce of plagiarism actually benefiting the original author. Maybe it made the author more popular or well-known (as with quotes; though, obviously, those are [ideally] cited and credit is given), or increasing the business or value of the original author.

    I'm still thinking. And I can't come up with a single example.

    Plagiarism is a crime, plain and simple, as well it should be.

  14. #14
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    thanks for the suggestions guys, no one has replied my e-mail from them and its been couple days.
    If your e-mail sent to him is anything like your posts here, I doubt if I would reply back either.

    Learn how to write.

  15. #15
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie2260 View Post
    I've been following this thread since it started in August, and (contrary to my usual urge to comment on everything I read) :-) I withheld my opinion. Fact is, I have been sitting here trying to think of an example in history or commerce of plagiarism actually benefiting the original author. Maybe it made the author more popular or well-known (as with quotes; though, obviously, those are [ideally] cited and credit is given), or increasing the business or value of the original author.

    I'm still thinking. And I can't come up with a single example.

    Plagiarism is a crime, plain and simple, as well it should be.

    Well said. As a writer, I truly take exception to the idea that "you'll get a link back" is a good excuse to let it go by. I don't think I would want to be linked with someone who is building a reputation as a thief.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  16. #16
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    Hi,

    Always have been and there will be those who want to succeed with the other people's work. This is an unfortunate fact.

    A beginner can do this either through ignorance or irresponsibility. In that case it may be enough a warning to stop.

    As I see, this is an another case, if they didn't respond so far. Perhaps, the person expects to get away with his theft withot any consequence.

    I feel that OP need to take and follow the advice of NeoSocrates.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shyflower View Post
    Well said. As a writer, I truly take exception to the idea that "you'll get a link back" is a good excuse to let it go by. I don't think I would want to be linked with someone who is building a reputation as a thief.
    I agree. I'm fine without 'benefits' like that.

    Best,

    Sandor

  17. #17
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    In most cases, the sites, especially those engaging in black hat SEO, won't probably respond to your request to stop copying your posts. What you can do is report them to the search engines immediately.

  18. #18
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by my_misyel View Post
    In most cases, the sites, especially those engaging in black hat SEO, won't probably respond to your request to stop copying your posts. What you can do is report them to the search engines immediately.
    Yes, and you can also file a DMCA with their web host. I've done it several times and with very few exceptions, it has resulted in a "take down" of the site until the offending work is removed.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  19. #19
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    Just let it be...and produce more content...don't waste your time with copiers everywhere on the net.

  20. #20
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    Copy a copyright to your article and then if someone steals legal action can be taken with Google Adsense and other things of this nature.

  21. #21
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    Plagiarism is wrong, writers work hard...
    All true.
    All meaningless when the metal meets the meat. You don't want your stuff stolen, don't put it on the web.
    Moral condemnations are both ineffectual and a questionable thing to spend your time, effort and stress on. Just saying.
    Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious.

  22. #22
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    You don't want your stuff stolen, don't put it on the web.
    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your car stolen, don't get one.

    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your business broken into and looted during a blackout (or at night), don't start one. (I mean, morals aside, just starve to death)

    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your print-on-paper articles and work OCR'd and put up on a plagiarist's website then don't write anything ...ever.

    This isn't the most interesting topic discussion. You're running the telemarketing scripts from the "I got mine" looter's playbook.

    But what if you wrote something with, say, a "cliffhanger ending?" Where you did reveal some information, but otherwise the reader has to consult your expertise for the rest.

    If the copy-cat can't complete the article when the (could be a reader, could be a client) asks; will they consider it worth stealing?

    The interesting questions are: 1) What gets lifted, and why? 2) What doesn't, and why? Generally, the same questions you'd ask if you were going to have a car and thievery exists.

    It does always amuse when the 'net turns out to be nothing like heaven, but exactly like the real world everywhere else, and nobody has the faintest idea how to deal with it.

  23. #23
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    Comparing to situations where you can reasonably take measures to prevent theft, AND there is a regulatory agency with the chops and the mandate to help you deal with a theft if it happens...interesting comparisons. Slightly hackneyed, a touch over simplified...

    You highlight my point really well however. None of the traditional theft fighting/preventing measures are available to you OP. The 'net is far too young and unregulated for those at this point. Protectionism is a highly alluring but ultimately questionable stance, IMO.
    Just my opinion, but I suspect the time resource and frustration involved in getting the stolen content removed will outweigh it's 'replacement cost'.

    - You can let it go and move on (as has been suggested and probably your best option IMO)
    - Fight for what's yours (but I think you'll only get a rather expensive sense of vindication)

    Ultimately, the choice is yours. I'm just asking who steers your ship? You, or content thieves?
    Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCrux View Post
    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your car stolen, don't get one.

    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your business broken into and looted during a blackout (or at night), don't start one. (I mean, morals aside, just starve to death)

    Moral considerations aside; if you don't want your print-on-paper articles and work OCR'd and put up on a plagiarist's website then don't write anything ...ever.

    This isn't the most interesting topic discussion. You're running the telemarketing scripts from the "I got mine" looter's playbook.

    But what if you wrote something with, say, a "cliffhanger ending?" Where you did reveal some information, but otherwise the reader has to consult your expertise for the rest.

    If the copy-cat can't complete the article when the (could be a reader, could be a client) asks; will they consider it worth stealing?

    The interesting questions are: 1) What gets lifted, and why? 2) What doesn't, and why? Generally, the same questions you'd ask if you were going to have a car and thievery exists.

    It does always amuse when the 'net turns out to be nothing like heaven, but exactly like the real world everywhere else, and nobody has the faintest idea how to deal with it.
    Good one... As I said before, a nice and friendly cease and desist letter may work. But the truth is that just as with car thieves, we will never eradicate copycats. Copycats have always and will always exist, to some greater or lesser extent depending on the issue. However, I strongly believe we should not let it go. It will be complicate to get legal action rolling, but thanks to the OCILLA, we can defend what we rightfully know is our own content.

    Here is a link I found on the subject, I hope it helps:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_...Limitation_Act

  25. #25
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    Well you can take some legal advice and can charge some legal action on him/her.


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