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  1. #1
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    How to edit Java projects

    Hi,

    I'm currently learning Java. I'm interested in seeing some of the big projects that have been made in Java, such as jEdit.

    I downloaded the source but I can't seem to find where to start from?

    I've been using Netbeans to learn how to open projects, but jEdit doesn't seem to have one. How do you deal with this across multiple projects where things aren't handled the same way as your IDE?

    Here is the source code: http://sourceforge.net/projects/jedi...r.bz2/download

  2. #2
    SiteP0int Weazle hooknc's Avatar
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    What are you asking exactly?

    Are trying to find out how to contribute to an open source project?
    baby steps... baby steps...

  3. #3
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    Not really. I just wanted to see how big projects look like, source wise.

    I found the Main to be jEdit.java in one of the folders. If I wanted to edit and mess around with the source, I couldn't just compile it, because, (at least with) Netbeans, it throws out a bunch of errors that it cannot find certain files, even though they exist.

    Also, Netbeans requires a project file in order to bring up all the files/packages as a bundle. I noticed that when it doesn't exist, I can only bring up 1 file at a time. And I think this is where the issue arises.

    I guess what I'm trying to ask, is how to import a bunch of files in order for the IDE to understand that it is a full project (whether it be Netbeans or Eclipse)?

  4. #4
    SiteP0int Weazle hooknc's Avatar
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    Your question requires a bit of a long answer.

    An IDE (eclipse or netbeans) is just a tool for helping develop code and each tool does some things differently then the other.

    It would be strange for a project like jEdit to try and supply all the different configurations for all the different IDEs out there so that people could help out and contribute code. So, projects like jEdit don't supply those files.

    HOWEVER, you should be in luck. I noticed that there is both a SVN and CVS repository. You should be able to find a plugin for your netbeans IDE that allows you to 'checkout' files from a repository and at the same time creating a new project for you in your IDE.

    In eclipse I use a product called subclipse because we use an SVN repository at work. You should be able to find something similar for Neabeans.
    baby steps... baby steps...

  5. #5
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    I guess when having an SVN repo it makes it easy to open the project. Here's another example, the YUI Compressor.

    http://yuilibrary.com/downloads/#yuicompressor

    They give you the full source, but I'm trying to figure out how to open up all the sources folders/files, so that I can compile it and or edit a file or something. It also makes it easier to see and navigate through all the files.

  6. #6
    SiteP0int Weazle hooknc's Avatar
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    Well, there is a build.xml file in that yuicompressor-2.4.2.zip file. That should help out a bit.

    Have you tried unzipping that file onto disk and then importing that specific directory into your IDE? That might just work. But I wouldn't put too much confidence in that working.

    Have you figured out how your IDE chooses its classpath and src directories yet? If not, look into how that works first. Then you should be able to take things like the yui-compressor and create a new project from them.

    Luckily, most project set their directory structure up similarly. Every once and a while you'll get a directory structure that is like nothing else you'll see, but those should be few and far between.
    baby steps... baby steps...


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