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  1. #1
    SitePoint Addict goma's Avatar
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    is it my design?

    I just got a project, an site for an ad agency. It appears that they attempted to make a website and they're not happy with it. The site they want me to work is just a study and hasn't been up yet. (these guys used a lot of page-sized jpegs). The CEO likes the colors they used but that's about it. I'm thinking of using these colors and maybe one or two images (I'm not even sure if these are theirs).

    My job: redo it if necessary.

    My solution: one splash page with a choice of html or flash version. Use the colors their boss likes, which will get rid of that pesky "gee-nice-color-but-could-you-use.." comment at the presentation. Get some rolyalty free shots and let my imagination run wild on this one.

    My dilemma: I want this to be one of the highlights of my portfolio. But its it right for me to say that it's "my" design? The colors choices aren't mine so I'm confused as to how to call this when I'm done with it.
    http://www.soapbox101.com

  2. #2
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    You can put it in your portfolio. Just say you redesigned it. I hardly take credit for everything on every site I work on but I still will put them in my portfolio if it is worthwhile.

    I disagree with your splash page idea, I feel you should use javascript to redirect the user to the appropriate page. But that is a different topic.
    Wayne Luke
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  3. #3
    SitePoint Addict goma's Avatar
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    I was thinking of using JS for redirection but won't visitors appreciate the ability to choose whether to go see the flash or html file. Someone might have the flash player but prefer to see the site in HTML for some reason.
    http://www.soapbox101.com

  4. #4
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    Well I can only speak personally. It adds an unneeded extra step and ensures that I will never visit such a site again.
    Wayne Luke
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  5. #5
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    That's a personal call. I'm a lot more likely to visit a site again if it gives me a good HTML option than if it sends me to a Flash page. I have broadband connections now, so I don't run away from Flash as quickly, but I still don't much care for it as a user and always choose HTML if I have a choice.

  6. #6
    Grumpy Mole Man Skunk's Avatar
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    Auto direct people to the flash version if you detect the flash plugin, but have a link at the bottom of the flash version to allow them to switch to the HTML version if they want to. Thayt way you avoid a splash screen (uurgh) but flash enabled visitors who would rather have an HTML version (like myself) still have that option.

    Alternatively don't have a flash version at all - will it really be able to provide anything in a more useful way than the HTML version?

  7. #7
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    i agree with skunk. avoid the splash screen

  8. #8
    SitePoint Addict goma's Avatar
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    It's for an ad agency and there's not a whole lot of text on the page and I feel that they could benefit from the impact of flash.

    thanks for the info guys. I'll look into avoiding the splash page when I can
    http://www.soapbox101.com

  9. #9
    My precious!!! astericks's Avatar
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    Originally posted by goma
    I was thinking of using JS for redirection but won't visitors appreciate the ability to choose whether to go see the flash or html file. Someone might have the flash player but prefer to see the site in HTML for some reason.
    The first time i visit your site, I'll be happy about the splash page, but on future visits...it gets a bit boring and annoying coz of the extra step.

    For the JS redirection, I think that depends on your target audience. If you plan to attract mostly 56k users, then the splash page might be a good idea. Though having the flash plugin, the user might not wanna wait for the page to load etc. Imagine surfing the net on a 56k conneciton with a 300mhz PC

    I personally think we have to cater more for users "at the bottom of the ladder"...namely, 56kers and maybe below.

  10. #10
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    I think that depends on your target audience.
    This statement could perhaps be the most important factor when making design decisions. Creating anything for presentation be it Web sites, advertisements, white papers, or even inter-office memos, puts you, as the creator, in a position to transmit a message through a medium to a receiver. As someone else mentioned, does the audience need a flash experience? What type of clients; that is, what industries is this ad agency working for? Are they local mom and pop or Fortune 500? Successful messengers do not overlook audience analysis.

    I only restate this notion because you're considering this project for a portfolio piece. Portfolios are about quality, not quantity. The best pieces of any portfolio, writing, photography, music, even dance choreographs clearly and concisely deliver some type of message. If that message is successfully received, that piece will certainly be good for showcasing. *Even better if you can tell a good story about the piece.*

    Anyway, is it your design? Parts of it should be. Things like making the decision to have a splash page or not goes to the development of a user experience. Are you keeping only the color choice, but changing form and function?
    Last edited by chrispalle; Jul 17, 2002 at 09:10.

  11. #11
    SitePoint Addict goma's Avatar
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    Funny how this thread has turned into a splash page / Flash discussion

    my other intention for asking this question was to get views on the ethical quandry:

    By using their color choices and maybe a few elements here and there, would it still be right for me to call this "my design"?

    In any case, the responses I got just makes it more apparent that this community is one of the best
    http://www.soapbox101.com

  12. #12
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    Now, I haven't seen exactly what you're talking about but I would have to say you could consider this piece suitable for your portfolio. To a degree, with any *new* design, a designer needs to use elements that are part of the corporate branding campaign; that is, unless there is a large-scale rebranding or something. This happens all the time. For example, right now I'm creating a site for a company and to retain unity in their marketing communications, I'm basing my design off their 2002 product catalog that was designed by someone else. The site design is still my concept.

    Here is the thing, though. When you're getting paid to create something, be it a design, an article, a movie score, ANY creative work, the real owner is the one paying for it. So, the best policy for solving your ethical quandary is to just ask permission from the one paying for it.


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